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New Pm 1030v Lathe

Discussion in 'PRECISION-MATTHEWS' started by shooter123456, Jul 29, 2016.

  1. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

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    That is a left hand cutting tool. It was in there to cut the underside of the rook tower. In the picture, the tool holder is loosened up so the 1-2-3 block could rest against the side of the compound without interference.

    Thats as far as I have been able to get. The bolts holding the block are so tight I haven't been able to remove them. I was talking about that part when I mentioned taking the apron apart as I thought the cross slide was part of it.
     
  2. NoobCanuk

    NoobCanuk Canada H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Wow. OK I must admit I am going to seriously follow your chess build. That is a game my father taught me when I was young. So I'd love to see how you do it and the final results. I'm willing to bet they will be pretty amazing when you are finished Shooter. I'll have to do some thinking myself now and see if I can design a chess set for a project to tinker on this winter. My farm is nearly done for this season so now I can return to my relaxing puttering around the garage.

    Thanks for the idea and I hope you won't mind me quite likely copying yours. But I wish you well and can't wait for more pics as you assemble your pieces. Also thanks for the other pics... I never in a million years would have thought of those blocks to align the tool post as you switch angles frequently (genius idea).
     
  3. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

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    Ill probably start a new post somewhere for the chess set. Ive been using this one just to share things more specific to the lathe so when someone searches for info on the 1030V, hopefully they find this thread and get more info than was available when I was searching for a new lathe.

    Of course! Thats why I share them!
     
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  4. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

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    I came across an issue with the chess set I am making. I needed a .750" ball on top of the pawns and no way to make them. I tried making a form tool but abandoned that as I had trouble getting the radius formed accurately.

    So I made a ball turning tool using some scrap I had laying around.

    I used:
    2 4x2x.5" 6061 blocks
    1 6061 block cut off from my AR lower project
    1 .750" O1 rod
    3 5/16x18 bolts
    1 washer
    5 10x24 screws
    1 3/8 carbide insert tool

    Order of ops was pretty much just cut off the stock, located and drill a few holes, then countersink a bit, then onto the 4 jaw, face, bore the through hole to fit the pin I made.

    Then I made the tool post, attached to the body, then put it on the cross slide to mark the center height, milled the slot, drilled and tapped for hilding screws, and boom done.

    It ended up being a little but below center so itll need to be shimmed. I tested it on a piece of scrap, and even a little low. I ran it in reverse so I could keep the tool post and the ball turner on at the same time.

    Here are a few of the parts after coming off the 4 jaw. I was very pleased with the finish.
    znMlAXP.jpg

    Here it is mounted up and after turning a ball. I need to make a cheater bar for it, but just holding the top plate went just fine.
    XeQ42fb.jpg
     

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  5. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

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    Im working on a chess set for my dad and the pawns needed 5 tools. I didnt have enough tool holders but then I remembered the lathe also came with the original turret tool post. I dug that out, set up 4 tools on it, and the 5th in a QCTP holder and went to work. Im not sure if the turret post is more rigid than the QCTP, but all the troubles I was having with parting ops went away. It started going so well that I started using the power crossfeed with no issues.

    The two tool posts can be changed in about 15 seconds and until I can make more tool holders, its really nice to have the standard tools in the turret and the less used/need more height adjustment in the QCTP.

    I had some trouble getting good spheres on top of the pawns until I figured out that I wasnt centered. Once I did that, they all started coming out uniformly. Though I had to chop off one of the corners and grind a tool to get enough clearance from the chuck and the radius on the tower of the pawn.

    Im posting more pictures, just so anyone whos considering this lathe can see what its capable of. I was running the machine pretty hard while I was making these to try to speed things up. The pawns took about 35 minutes each from start to finish. The lathe was running full blast for probably 8 straight hours ranging from 200 rpm for the parting cuts to 800 RPM for the removal cuts. Also switch it to reverse to cut the tops. Not a single problem with the machine. Everything ran like a top exactly how it was supposed to. On the HF, it would have taken at least 3x as long and I would have to stop at least twice to fix or adjust something.

    Heres a look at the form tool I made, getting lined up. Its .250" wide and running at 200 RPM, the lathe had no trouble with the cut.
    DFC1yGD.jpg

    There were several low clearance parting cuts. That made stuff interesting.
    BkVTJrJ.jpg

    Heres everything so far. You can see that some of the heads came out wonky but the rest are pretty uniform. I dont think they are so far out to throw them away and re do.
    yRbHoG0.jpg
     

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  6. wrmiller

    wrmiller Chief Tinkerer H-M Supporter-Premium

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  7. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

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    Looks like its time for another update on the 1030 after roughly 300 hours of use. The machine is still running very well, and issues have been minimal.

    The spindle developed a knocking at some point, that took some adjusting of the motor mount to re-tension the belt and pulleys. That took about 10 minutes to locate (I originally thought it was coming from the chuck somehow) and 5 minutes to fix. That was in the middle of december and I haven't had an issue since.

    The 3 jaw started to come loose on me. I think it was because of temperature changes allowing the bolts to loosen up a bit. It didn't pop off or crash or anything, but when I started working one day (the first cold day we had this year), the finish was garbage on my part. I checked the chuck last and the bolts were hardly torqued down.

    I have spun some square parts off center, and I will certainly be needing a new bench for this thing. It couldn't go over 300 RPM before the whole table started to rock back and forth. I used it for facing and squaring some stock for my CNC conversion of the mill since I have trouble getting parts super square on the mill. The head never seems to stay trammed for very long. I also used it to bore out some holes on those parts with no trouble.

    I threaded a part for 10x24 to make the cross for the kings on the chess set and it threaded the tiny rod very well.

    Here is the chess set as it was done on Christmas. I didn't finish the bishops or the knights unfortunately. I just wrapped up one of the kings and gave that to him, and he was thrilled. I believe his exact words were "Holy **** you made this?!" then he asked if I was trying to make the whole set since he had seen the buckets and buckets of chips I had made. Then I went into the other room and brought them out and there were more expletives. When I asked him what he wanted for Christmas a month or so back, he said "A set of drill bits because I am pretty sure mine are pretty much yours now" (Whoops, I use his bits a lot...)

    18XOMhv.jpg

    Here is a closer view of one of the kings. I am going to mill the bottom part square at some point soon.
    al7V75a.jpg

    My girlfriend saw a ring like this online and she said thats the kind she likes. A simple, shiny band. (Its not a wedding ring, we aren't there yet). I made this out of a piece of scrap 303 stainless, then polished it up to 2000, then hit it with mothers polishing compound until I could see myself. It came out a little big for her, so I will make her another at some point. It took about 4 hours to do.

    AW2Oxja.jpg

    D0D1e1e.jpg

    The lathe is overdue for an oil change so I will need to set aside time to do that soon. I am also looking into a flood coolant system for it and I will need to build a new stand because the one I have now isn't cutting it. I will also be making a chamber reamer with it in the coming months so it will need a little bit of work before I do that. I am confident I will be able to hold .0005" with it when I do that. It should also see some barrel work soon too.

    I got some cool stuff for it for christmas including a live center, an MT4 to ER32 collet holder (poor mans collet chuck?), a set of ER32 collets and 2 green mountain barrel blanks. When I do the barrel work, I am either going to need to make an outboard spider, or rig something up to hold with 8 points of contact in the 4 jaw. The collet holder advertises .0002" of runout, but I haven't been able to mount it up to confirm. Though I am not hopeful it will do that well.

    Here is the collet holder with the largest bolt they had a lowes. It needs an M16 bolt thats at least 8 inches long to use for the draw bar and they only had 6". I am going to look at fastenal before I make one.
    siAPzL7.jpg
     
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  8. ASD9000

    ASD9000 United States Swarf Registered Member

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    That chess set looks great! It reminds me I need to practice more. I ended up doing an oil change, and boy do I recommend it. I posted some pictures of the stuff i found, and it is not limited to whats in the pictures, there was more but when I opened the apron is when I felt the need to take pictures, since as you see there are epoxy pebbles inside.

    A quick question anyone come up with an apron lock yet? I was cutting a large tube and was wishing I had it.
     

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    Last edited: Jan 13, 2017
  9. ch2co

    ch2co United States Grumpy Old Man H-M Supporter-Premium

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    "Here is the collet holder with the largest bolt they had a lowes. It needs an M16 bolt thats at least 8 inches long to use for the draw bar and they only had 6". I am going to look at fastenal before I make one."

    How about all thread? Make your own length.

    CHuck the grumpy old guy
     
  10. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

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    I thought of doing that, but Lowes and Home Depot didn't have M16 all thread. I found some at fastenal but it was $18 for a foot of it, but I didn't want to spend that. Instead, I found a 100mm M16x2 bolt, drilled and tapped the head for 5/16x18, and used that and a 5/16x18 bolt to hold it in place. Seemed to work pretty well.
     
  11. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

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    I have had a few people PM (hehe PM in a PM forum) about the power and rigidity of the machine, especially at the low end.

    Here is a short video of it parting 1.5" 4140 using a 3/32 wide cobalt HSS parting tool held in the included QC parting tool holder. It is cutting using the power feed too which means the motor has to provide the torque to move the tool and the stock. As you will notice, it isn't the best set up for rigidity since the piece is 36" long at this point, the tool has to stick out pretty far to get to the middle, and its 2" away from the chuck face. You'll notice that it really doesn't care and its having no trouble. This is probably the most torque and rigidity demanding thing I have done with it.

     
  12. DrAsus

    DrAsus United States Steel Registered Member

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    Awesome thread!

    DrAsus

    Sent from my XT1575 using Tapatalk
     
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  13. BellyUpFish

    BellyUpFish United States Active User Active Member

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    Did you ever tackle this problem?

    I had my 1030V apart last night for some "initial cleaning" and noticed this very thing. Going to have to add a witness mark somehow..
     
  14. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

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    I haven't bothered. For angles that matter, I set them with a dial indicator. The ones that don't matter, guestimating has been fine and I probably get within 5 degrees just eyeballing where a witness mark might be.

    My plan for fixing it though was taking a little metal pointer that came off my mill, cutting of the tip, and super gluing it to cross slide. To set the compound to exactly zero, I was going to chuck something up, cut it until its concentric and a clean surface, then use the DI to line the compound up.
     
  15. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

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    Remember my poor mans collet chuck? I gotta say, I am happy with it for what it cost me.

    Here it is all attached and tightened into place in the lathe.
    [​IMG]

    Here is my concoction for holding it in place.
    [​IMG]

    It seems to work fine, but I am sure I lose a little bit of rigidity doing this.

    Very conveniently, it uses the spanner wrench for my X2 mill spindle nut and the huge wrench used for the column nut. Measuring the inside of the taper with my .0005" dial test indicator, it is out around .00025" to .0003". Not bad! When I stuck a tool holder blank in it, it was initially out about .001", but I was able to tap it into about .0002" or less.

    Its tough to measure the run out of the tool in the mills tool holder since I am having some spindle runout issues at the moment, so I can't say just how concentric the boring is.

    The tool holder is made with 4140 and the outside profile before the indicator fluid is turned in the collet holder. I managed to get a vacuum fit between the bore and endmill which I am very pleased with.

    Here is that tool holder with that fit.


    I have some brass coming soon that I will make a new gib for the compound with. The standard one is just too rough. I ordered a small surface plate so I will be able to figure out how flat the face is and how well the gib is machined.

    I also scored a bunch of carbide inserts on an ebay auction. 41 assorted inserts for $26 shipped. I calculated the retail price for all of them at $846! A few are negative rake inserts and I will need to make holders for all of them. I am interested to see how the machine handles negative insert tooling.
     
  16. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

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    I have been running the lathe hard this weekend. It has started to complain and I can tell it needs some maintenance.

    It turned a 1.5"x48" piece of 4140 steel into 4 TTS style tool holders, 5 profiled TTS blanks, 1 unprofiled blank, 1 piece of precision scrap that I hope to salvage into a drill chuck holder, and 6" of steel with a center drill spot on the end. I was running .015" cuts at its fastest feed rate and about 900 RPM. It was removing a ton of material very quickly.

    Here are the holders. I wasn't too concerned with making them identical to each other. You can see that they are slightly different from each other.
    [​IMG]

    I also made some D bits using O1 tool steel. They are 55 degrees and 35 degrees. I was only planning to make 1, but I accidentally made the 35 degree one when I needed the 55 degree one. This was to make new gibs for my mill.
    [​IMG]

    I thought the tool looked really good before I tempered it so I took a picture.
    [​IMG]

    I really need to change the oil, take the machine apart and clean it, then put it back together and get everything adjusted again. Too many projects I wan't to do and I keep putting off the maintenance...
     
  17. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

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    Ya know how you learn more, then do something you have done plenty of times, but now that you know more, you notice things that you never noticed before? Well thats what happened to me! I took apart a bunch of the lathe to clean everything up and found some trouble. I also tried using the 4 jaw to indicate something in true and found a bunch of run out, so much so that the whole chuck is visibly eccentric when the lathe is on, and at higher speeds, its shakes the lathe as if I am turning off center.

    Lets start from the beginning. The compound. I took off the tool holder and loosened the gib then walked the top of the compound off the bottom of it. Looking at the compounds base dovetails, I see that there is a very thin wear strip on both sides, and it doesn't look like it is wearing anywhere else. I am wondering if there are burrs on the top dovetails that are preventing decent contact and causing that strip of wear. I just got a granite surface plate so once I figure out how to do the dye transfer thing I see in a lot of videos, I will find out how flat it is. Pics of that:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Also, the base a has very nice ground finish on the top... But that doesn't touch anything. Why is that ground but the ways themselves are just machined (and somewhat roughly I might add)? I saw a video about the Seig X2 mill where the guy said the Chinese were getting a reputation for very poor quality so they started grinding the dovetails instead of machining, except they ground the surfaces that don't touch anything and left all the contact surfaces roughly machined. I wonder if thats the case here...

    Moving on, I took the cross slide off ,and noted a few things.

    -There are gouges in the bottom dovetails
    -There are corresponding dings in the top dovetails
    -The gib is only spotted twice even though there are 4 gib screws and 1 locking screw
    -The nut for the lead screw is a split nut with tensioning screws, but they were not tensioned
    -The cross slide ways are scraped, but there is still rough machining left in some areas. Shouldn't that have been ground first, then scraped?
    -There is play in the lead screw end block that seems to be on par with the 20 thou movement I couldn't seem to remove, though I am not certain thats what is causing it. I can't find any other play in the assembly.

    Picture of the bottom dovetail gouges. It was tough to get the picture, but the gouges are along the right side running almost the full length of the dovetail.
    [​IMG]

    Picture of the dings that caused those. I looked back at the pictures from when I first got the lathe, and the dings are there, I just didn't notice them. I think this happened before I got the lathe because the picture of the assembly from 6 months ago was taken when the slide was removed, wiped off, then the picture was taken. No where for it to have gotten that.
    [​IMG]

    Picture of that split nut. The machining is pretty rough, but this is the bottom and it doesn't touch anything. The top is better, but not by much. When I put it back together, I will try to tension the screws and see how much backlash is removed.
    [​IMG]

    Picture of the gib. You can see it is ground very nicely, but only 2 spots, despite the 5 screws. Is that normal? All the gibs I have ever come across are spotted for each screw.
    [​IMG]

    Here is the rough machining on the scraped ways. I wonder if that is just a low spot or an oversight. Seems like a waste to go through the effort of scraping to leave a few sections of rough machining. Also, is scraping always done by hand or was this done by a machine?
    [​IMG]

    Here is a picture of the play I found in end block. I am not sure if it is supposed to have play, but I haven't been able to find anywhere else that the movement could be coming from. Is there a way to call users in this forum? Maybe @qualitymachinetools could have a look and tell me if that looks right.
    [​IMG]

    Now on to the 4 jaw. I took it apart to see if I could find whatever is causing the run out. It was really bad. After indicating a part in true so there was less than .00025" ecentricity at one point, about .150 inches farther out from the chuck, it was out .003". No amount of tapping with a dead blow or adjusting the jaws could get it to run within .001 at both points .150 inches from each other. The part that was grasped in the jaws and the part being indicated where machined together, in 1 set up, one after the other. As in I roughed both diameters, finished one, then finished the other, so its very unlikely that the part was bumped or shaken loose between those two cuts. It was also consistent among 3 different but identical parts.

    As a side note, is there any way to check that the cross slide travel is perpendicular to the spindle bore? I am not sure how I would measure that.

    I measured the spindle again, both inside the taper and on the face. There was the faintest wiggle from the taper with a .0005" DTI, but it must have been under .0001". Though when I first got the lathe, I checked the same spot with the same indicator and got absolutely zero movement. The face was also perfectly square. The indicator showed almost no movement, less than the spindle taper. I also pushed on the spindle to check the bearings and even leaning into it fairly hard, it didn't move at all. Thats a good sign right?

    When I took the chuck apart, I noted several things.
    -There are a few dings on the rear of the chuck with the backplate removed. The first thing I did when I got the lathe was clean the faces and remount the back plate. I don't recall scuffing it up at all, and I was specifically careful not to drop it or place it on any rough surfaces. The lathe did ship with the 4 jaw assembled and the back plate installed if I recall correctly. I think the dings and scuffs are from carelessness from the manufacturer.
    -The backplate has a ground surface and a machined surface on the face that faces the back of the chuck. Again, the ground surface doesn't contact anything and the register surface is machined.
    -The bore that registers on the spindle nose is machined, not roughly, but definitely not as nice as a ground finish
    -The face that registers on the spindle face is ground, though the 3 jaw that shipped with it isn't ground on that face if I remember right
    -The rear of the 4 jaw is ground, though there are some dings on the register surface and a deep gouge on the back of the face that doesn't contact anything.

    Here is picture of the back of the chuck. Note the dings, gouges, and scuffs, as well as the nice ground finish.
    [​IMG]

    Tried to light up the gouge so you can see how deep it is. That sucker is nasty and I am trying to imagine a way that it got in there.
    [​IMG]

    Here is the backplate on the end that contacts the chuck. You can see the ground surface where it touches nothing, but the machined surfaces where it contacts other parts. You can also see what looks like chatter marks in the bore.
    [​IMG]

    So thats how it looks after 6 months of use. I want to figure out how to check the contact in the dovetails and see if the ground surface is worthwhile, or if the rough edges defeat the purpose. I also want to see if the cross slide is making decent contact in the ways, or if those wear marks are really the only areas where it is touching.

    So a few questions if anyone has gotten this far:

    1. Whats with the very nicely ground non contact surfaces, and less nice machined contact surfaces everywhere?
    2. Where should I look to find the 4 jaw run out?
    3. How do I check that the apron travels parallel to the spindle bore and cross slide is perpendicular?
    4. What is the right way to measure flatness and squareness of the dovetails?

    I hope the updates and pictures are worthwhile to people considering the machine, as well as those who already have one. I am learning as I go and I am still pretty new to machining. I got my 7x12 lathe in February 2016 and the PM 1030V in August 2016, so I only have a year of experience with lathes. Though I learn more and more and I am doing my best to pass that on.
     
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  18. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Too many questions for me to address, but I will touch on a couple of them... Some of the non-touching surfaces are reference surfaces, and they need to be correct for completing the rest of the part to the correct geometry. The factory scraping you are looking at is decorative, nothing more...
     
  19. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

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    I appreciate the answers. I hadn't thought about the ground surfaces being reference surfaces. Makes a lot of sense. Thats unfortunate about the scraping. Ill have to see how flat it really is. Thanks again!
     
  20. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I feel some dissatisfaction and frustration in your posts. Pretty much all that you posted are definite issues with your lathe, but you do have to look at the big picture. These lathes are mass produced to a very low price point for the amount of parts and machining that go into them. Proper fits take time, lots of time, which costs money. Dings and rough work arise from hectic work, all again to get it out the door at the price point. Corners are further cut to undercut the competition. It is amazing that these lathes are as inexpensive as they are, even with their warts, when just the multiple markups and multiple shipping costs are considered. So, we get machines that will operate but will not be at their best potential. As hobbyists, we can spend the time and effort that the factory did not, and get them improved to our expectations. Hobbyists work cheap... Or we can buy MUCH more expensive machines that come nicely finished and ready to do accurate work. TANSTAAFL.
     
  21. jbolt

    jbolt United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    The following assumes the spindle is aligned to the bed and there is no twist in the bed.

    For the chuck start at ground zero and measure the face of the spindle. Next check for burrs and install the back plate and measure the face of the chuck mating surface. Next check for burrs and install the chuck body and measure the face.

    The spindle should be good. If the back plate is not running true you can skim cut the mating surface. If the chuck body is out it would need to be disassembled and examined.

    If all of the above are good it could be the jaws or T-slots are not perfect. You can check that with a precision ground rod by measuring along the top and front checking for taper. Turn the chuck 1/4 turn and measure again.

    The quick and dirty method for checking the cross slide is to face a piece of material, the larger the better, and running an indicator across the face. It should read zero across the entire face.

    Use a 0-4-0 dial test indicator for the above.
     
  22. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

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    I don't mean to give the impression that I am unhappy with the machine. I am very satisfied with it and I think I have done some excellent work with it.

    My intention with these posts, and this thread really, is to try to get information out there about what people can expect from the lathe and to identify the issues with it so that it can be improved. I'm also trying to learn more. I see things that I think are off, but they may be fine, I just don't know any better.

    So I'm not trying to poopoo the machine or dissuade anyone from buying one. I just think it has massive potential beyond the results I have been seeing (again, not that I am dissatisfied) and I hope to achieve that potential by identifying shortcomings and correcting them. All of the "complaints" (is that the right word? I don't feel like I'm complaining) I have posted are either for the benefit of others who have the machine or might get one so they know what they should look for to fix, or they are for me to get guidance from the more knowledgeable people here as to how best to address them.

    Again, when I say "there is rough machining here" or "I found some dings there" I'm not saying "Look at this piece of ****, this lathe is garbage" I'm saying "I could get better rigidity and motion if I smooth out this area" or "Check for dings there so you don't Marr up this other part."

    I do apologize if my posts come across negatively. I love my machines and I like working on them as much as I like making stuff with them.

    My Dad is an attorney and my mom is an accountant. I read a quote once that said "Never go to an attorney or accountant for help, they are trained to seek out problems, not solutions."

    I texted my dad when I read that and said "Looks like I got shafted since I can't go to either of my parents for help." He replied "It's a lot easier to come up with solutions when you have already found the problem."
     
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  23. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

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    Thank you for the response. I will try that now.
     
  24. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I probably came across wrong as well, because it was also obvious in your posts that you want to make the machine better while you have it apart. That is the perfect way to do things, and I try to do the same, leave everything better than I found it. Stoning dings and burs, improving fits, smoothing surfaces, making the geometry correct. Those are all pretty simple and satisfying tasks (except the geometry) that all of us can do with our machines, no matter how good or bad they were from the factory. We also learn how things work in the process, and acquire new skills and new understanding of how things work (and don't work.)
     
  25. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Ground surfaces are not always reference surfaces. Sometimes they are just the easiest and quickest way to do an operation on the part. I find myself doing a lot of that with my new/old surface grinder. It is important to understand the generation and uses for reference surfaces. You cannot use ways for reference surfaces because they are worn, but sometimes you can use a portion of the way where there has been no sliding contact. A big flat reference surface that is convenient for measuring and testing the other surfaces is ideal.
     
  26. KeithK

    KeithK United States Iron Registered Member

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    I'm looking into picking up PM-1030v and have not been able to really find any videos of this lathe in action. How big of a cut can you take on Steel before she starts complaining? Also are you still happy with the machine?

    Thanks
    Keith
     
  27. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

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    I havent taken much video of the lathe since I dont have a tripod and its hard to run it with one hand while recording.

    Its hard to say about how big of a cut it can take. When I am roughing, I usually set the feed to its highest setting and take .03" cuts (.06" off the diameter) with the 3/8" carbide insert holders everyone has. It doesnt have any trouble doing that in O1, W1, 1018, 4140, or 303 stainless. I have never used it to cut hardened steel or any of the more exotic materials. I have experimented with deeper cuts on the slowest feed, but the lighter cuts at fast speed tend to remove material fastest for me. I have cut at deep as .1" (.2 off the diameter) while running the lathe at a low speed and feeding by hand. It works, but its not happy doing it. When I have enough stock in the chuck and the workpiece is thick enough, I have taken .05" cuts (.1" off the diameter) on the middle feed setting and that's about as much as it can handle before it really struggles. You can hear the motor strain and the RPM dips, but it manages to pull through the cut.

    I am still happy with the machine. Ive mentioned a few times in this thread that this lathe was the "reach" for me. I was looking at the 10x22 lathe from Grizzly when someone pointed out PM to me and it was like bells went off in my head. The 1030v addressed all the shortcomings I considered when looking at the 10x22. The 8" longer bed, the 1HP variable motor, the power cross feed, the tachometer, and tailstock lever lock where all big pluses.

    Also, I was upgrading from a Harbor Freight 7x12 which I think is a contributing factor to my satisfaction with the 1030. The 7x12 weight 90 lbs and I could move it myself. The 1030 is a little over 400 and I needed my dad and brother to help me get it onto the bench. It is much better built than the 7x12 was, and the extra size and power really blew me away after being used to the 7x12.

    Also, you really cant beat the customer service. After dealing with other companies in the past and the difficulty with getting help, I would pay more for an inferior product from PM specifically for their customer service. All of the issues I have contacted them about recieved responses from people within 24 hours. Usually within 2 hours, an actual person will respond either with an answer or "Matt is out doing such and such and will be back around X time to answer this question." Its the little things like that that make the big difference.

    Im happy to answer any other questions you have. I am coming up on 9 months of ownership with it and many hundreds of hours running it. If I had all of my money back, I would buy the lathe again. I dont think any machine out there could beat the 1030 in the price range with the features I wanted and the customer service they offer.
     
    jer likes this.
  28. KeithK

    KeithK United States Iron Registered Member

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    Shooter, thank you for getting back to me. I too am coming from a HF 7 x 12, I have the machine as dialed in as I could get it but it sure is frustrating when parting steel's and takes a long time to turn material down not too mention if you take just a wee bit too much the machine will start fine then shut off on over current in the middle of that cut. I'm sure you know the frustrations that machine brings, but i must say it was a very good learning tool on how to rebuild one. LOL.

    Sounds like it will be a huge leap for me and some welcomed relief. BTW, I love that chess set you're building it looks awesome.
     
  29. hlj3

    hlj3 United States Swarf Registered Member

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    I just received my PM1030V a few weeks ago, and did the 3 man lift on to the bench. If I had to do it again (which I do) I will use a shop crane with a load leveler. I still have to bolt it down, level it and setup. I'll be making tobacco pipes on it for the most part, but I'm sure a few unrelated "special projects" will crop up soon.
    H L
     
  30. KeithK

    KeithK United States Iron Registered Member

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    Congrats, can you keep us posted on your experience with the new machine.
     
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