1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

    Dismiss Notice

New Pm 1030v Lathe

Discussion in 'PRECISION-MATTHEWS' started by shooter123456, Jul 29, 2016.

  1. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    122
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Cary
    State:
    North Carolina

    -Return to Top-

    I have been looking to upgrade my current lathe for a little while now. I started on an HF 7x12 to learn the ropes, decide if I liked machining, and see if I was any good at it. After spending at least 250 hours in 5 months on it, I decided that I liked it and wanted to move on to bigger and better things. I sold the HF lathe and this Wednesday (7/27) I ordered the 1030v with QCTP. I got the call from the UPS terminal this morning (7/29) that it is ready for me to pick up. I had heard of long wait times but that thing got here in a day and a half. (Pittsburgh to NC).

    I will be going shortly to pick it up and I will post pics later of everything is anyone is interested. The plan is to have UPS drop in on a trailer, back the trailer into the garage where it is going, then slide it off the trailer in front of the bench. I am going to see if my brother, my dad, and myself can lift it 3.5 feet up onto the bench but if that fails, I have a reservation for an engine hoist tomorrow.

    I sent 8 emails back and forth with Matt at PM and he answered a whole ton of questions for me and I don't think any of the responses took more than an hour.

    If anyone has any ideas for getting the lathe up onto the bench without an engine hoist, I would be happy to listen. I was thinking of trying to rig something up with a 3 ton floor jack that will get it about 2.5 feet, then placing the lathe on jack stands and finding a way to lift the jack up off the floor and lift it the last 1 foot. I am not willing to risk damaging a $2000 machine though to save $20 on a hoist rental so if it seems at all sketchy, I will abandon that idea.
     
  2. Gary Gill

    Gary Gill United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    21
    Trophy Points:
    8
    City:
    Indianapolis
    State:
    Indiana

    -Return to Top-

    From my own experience I'll suggest you get the right equipment and manpower to safely move the lathe. I broke both bones in my leg and crushed my ankle with a lathe in 2009. Another $50.00 in rental fees would have saved me thousands in medical bills. Three surgeries and seven years later, it hurts most everyday. My impatience and frugal attitude was foolish.
     
  3. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    2,881
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    USA
    City:
    Sacramento
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    Too sketchy, and too dangerous! What is the shipping weight of the lathe? If you divide that by three and it is something you think you three can handle easily, then go for it. Do you have plenty of access so the lift will not be awkward for anybody? Getting it up even a few inches will make the lift easier. Lifting a lathe is not worth hurting a back or foot or anything else. Watch out for engine hoists, they are usually narrow at the mast end. You may need to jack it high enough to get the hoist under it, and you must also be able to get the hoist under the stand/table.
     
  4. wrmiller

    wrmiller Chief Tinkerer H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    853
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sierra Vista
    State:
    Arizona

    -Return to Top-

    It's a 400 lb. lathe. Two strong guys can pick it up and set it on it's stand. If you don't have two strong guys available, use a engine hoist, strap it up properly and lift it onto the stand. Emphasis on strapping the lathe properly, i.e., balance the lift, don't wrap the strap around the leadscrew, use a properly rated strap, etc., etc..

    And congrats on the new lathe! :)
     
    JimDawson likes this.
  5. jer

    jer Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    46
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    SE
    State:
    Colorado

    -Return to Top-

    First be careful and use good common sense. My 40+(YO) son, a strong 16 year old nephew and myself, 60+ (YO) lifted mine off my trailer. It was heavy but doable. I now have a 2 ton engine hoist and would use it when needed again. I may be unloading a knee mill next week, I hope that is enough for that 2000/2400 lb beast. :)
     
  6. MSD0

    MSD0 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    35
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    City:
    Fremont
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    I wouldn't take the chance of getting hurt or damaging your new lathe. A hoist will let you take your time and set it down exactly where you want it.
     
  7. Muskt

    Muskt United States Home Shop Tinkerer Active Member

    Likes Received:
    124
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Greenwood
    State:
    Delaware

    -Return to Top-

    Perfectly doable by yourself--IF CAREFUL.

    My PM 12x36--assembled, & moved by myself + the engine hoist.

    Best to you
    Jerry in Delaware

    upload_2016-7-30_11-46-51.jpeg
     
  8. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    122
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Cary
    State:
    North Carolina

    -Return to Top-

    Thanks for the replies everyone. What we ended up doing was getting the crate onto a dolly, then sliding that right in front of the bench, taking the crate apart, and taking the chip tray, chuck shield, and tail stock off. Then we slid a 2x6 under the headstock foot and I lifted from the tail stock and we were able to lift it without a problem. I was going to get an engine hoist, but by how easy it was to move the crate, we went ahead and give it a try.

    I got the chance to use it for a while today and my impression is somewhat mixed...

    The good:

    -The motor is very strong, much stronger than I am used to
    -The QCTP is excellent, very fast tool changes
    -The power cross feed is excellent, I don't know how I lived without it
    -I like being able to rough cut quickly and switch to finishing speed quickly
    -You can set the speed and turn it off then turn it back on and it returns to the same speed
    -Tachometer
    -Three jaw chuck was very accurate and the chuck key is beefy
    -Tailstock was almost perfectly aligned
    -Tailstock utilizes a lever lock
    -Great surface finish in stainless with carbide insert tooling

    The not so good:

    -The gearbox is leaking oil from somewhere underneath. I will have to try to figure that one out sooner than later
    -The drip tray had fallen off the lid at some point and was just laying on top of the machine
    -There are mulitple typos and mis-spellings on the machine itself
    -The included manual is not accurate for the machine, full of typos and spelling errors, and tells me a lot more about machining than the actual machine (ie it says you can rotate the compound rest to turn a taper, but it doesn't say how to rotate the compound).
    -The screws to mount the 4 jaw to the adapter plate were too high and there wasn't enough clearance between them and the spindle plate

    Here is the crate at the terminal. I moved it more toward the middle about a mile down the road. It was bouncing the hitch up and down really hard so far back.
    KUIfVOl.jpg
    I didn't take any pictures of the moving process because we were a little pressed for time and we were busy trying not to break anything. Here it is up on the bench. It will be leveled out sometime this week. e5gPLqB.jpg
    Here is a muzzle brake suppressor mount I am almost done with.
    LdZUiv5.jpg
    Spot the typo.
    9ALnGef.jpg
    There's two of them here.
    DTJBREt.jpg
    Here is the screw on the 4 jaw, the picture is taken level with the rear of the adaptor plate.
    0xcYFxk.jpg
    I ground it down (not while it was attached to the chuck) and there is still enough meat to grab onto with the allen key.
    Q9AcjRF.jpg
    Here it is with the clearance. The mark on the spindle is for the 3 jaw. There wasn't a mark already on the 4 jaw.
    NCimL2B.jpg

    Overall I am very happy with it so far. Some of the oversights and the manual were disappointing, but so far I am confident that the machine itself is capable and accurate.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2016
    NoobCanuk, rdean, Bamban and 3 others like this.
  9. MSD0

    MSD0 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    35
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    City:
    Fremont
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    Congrats on the new lathe. Matt has been really good about taking care of issues on my lathe. The typos and manual are typical for Chinese machines. I think mine also has the "Don not remove knobs when machine is running warning" (Do not move knobs when running!).
     
  10. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    122
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Cary
    State:
    North Carolina

    -Return to Top-

    **Edited to make the post less negative and to clarify my frustration with the manual, not so much the machine and QMT. As you saw, at 6 oclock on a Sunday, Matt was around to help offering advice. Thats not something you will see from many companies.**

    I have been having some trouble with the change gears to cut a thread. The manual doesn't provide a ton of insight. Maybe it is due to my relative inexperience, or just because my work has been entirely with a HF 7x12 until now.

    Step 5 says 'Install the gear couples according to the thread and feed table and screw the gearwheels onto the quadrant again."

    So I need to know how to install these gears correctly. What the proper order is (Square nut, e clip, coupler and gears, washer, and nut?) and how tight they need to be, how tight with the other gears, etc. How do these square brass nut things work? How do I screw them back onto the quadrant?

    Step 8 says "Readjust gear backlash by inserting a normal piece of paper as an adjusting or distance aid between the gear wheels."

    How do I adjust the gear backlash? What am I tightening or loosening and how tight or loose should it be? Where is the paper supposed to go? Between gear wheels as in the teeth or the flats between adjacent gears?

    The gears are incredibly tight and sharp... Not sure yet if they need to be broken in or if I am doing something wrong.

    The manual could use some improvement, but Matt has said they are working on that.

    What do the H's and L's mean on the gear charts?
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2016
    NoobCanuk likes this.
  11. qualitymachinetools

    qualitymachinetools United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    238
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    City:
    Pittsburgh
    State:
    Pennsylvania

    -Return to Top-

    Download the one on the 1127VFLB Page, it covers 95% of the information on this one too, they are almost the same. The manual for the 1022/1030 is coming up on our list, but will be some time. And the paper is to get the backlash spacing on the gears. Who is this by the way? You can email me direct, I have been here all day.
     
  12. qualitymachinetools

    qualitymachinetools United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    238
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    City:
    Pittsburgh
    State:
    Pennsylvania

    -Return to Top-

  13. GA Gyro

    GA Gyro H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    156
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Atlanta
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

    Yeah... most stuff from the other side of the ocean... has manuals written by folks to whom English is a second language...
    Chinglish is what it has been called.

    Show a pic of the plate with the threading guides on it... usually on the headstock... and someone will walk you through it.
     
  14. qualitymachinetools

    qualitymachinetools United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    238
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    City:
    Pittsburgh
    State:
    Pennsylvania

    -Return to Top-

    Yes, and I am here for about another half hour if you email or call, after that, I am headed out for the day.

    -Matt
     
  15. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    122
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Cary
    State:
    North Carolina

    -Return to Top-

    I think I have it mostly sorted out. The problem I am having is that the gears arent spinning in the shaft. When they turn they just tighten down until they lock. I think its because the square nuts dont fit properly with the gears and dont allow them to rotate freely.

    muHgMDR.jpg
     
  16. qualitymachinetools

    qualitymachinetools United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    238
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    City:
    Pittsburgh
    State:
    Pennsylvania

    -Return to Top-

    Make the sure washers in the back where it tightens agains that long bar arent getting bent in, try to flip them around if they are. I have had that happen, some people have used grade 8 washers and that seemed to take care of it too, since they are stronger
     
  17. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    122
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Cary
    State:
    North Carolina

    -Return to Top-

    **Edited to remove unnecessary comment**

    The washers arent bent in, flipping them doesnt help. Ill try out some grade 8 washers to see if that helps.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2016
    NoobCanuk likes this.
  18. qualitymachinetools

    qualitymachinetools United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    238
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    City:
    Pittsburgh
    State:
    Pennsylvania

    -Return to Top-

    It doesn't need them, it was just a suggestion to help try to get you going if that's what happened.
     
  19. 3dshooter80

    3dshooter80 United States Master of Metal Malpractice Active Member

    Likes Received:
    451
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Raleigh
    State:
    North Carolina

    -Return to Top-

    What part of NC are you in? If you are somewhere central, I will be glad to help you figure the machine out. The gear swaps are confusing at first but once you figure it out it is a piece of cake.
     
    NoobCanuk likes this.
  20. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    122
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Cary
    State:
    North Carolina

    -Return to Top-

    I am in Cary, ill post my procedure to make sure I am not doing something wrong. I might need to take you up one that. Ill send Matt an email this morning as well.

    The problem is caused by 2 things as far as I can tell: every time I swap the gear couplers, the shafts on the square bolts don't fit anymore. When I tighten the gears onto the quadrant and put the e-clips on, the e-clips bind to the gear causing the nut and clip to rotate with the gear, and tightening it until they lock in place completely.

    Here is what I did:

    1. Open gear cover

    2. Loosen and swing out the quadrant

    3. Loosen and remove the square bolts and remove top two gear sets

    4. Using a piece of aluminum tap out the gear couplers

    5. Using the same piece of aluminum tap the coupler into the new gear then tap the next gear onto the coupler

    6. Try to insert square bolts, they don't fit

    7. Tap bolts into place, use wrench to rotate them until they can spin freely. This took about 20 minutes each time (3 gear changes total)

    8. Put washer between quadrant and gear assembly, install gear on quadrant and tighten down

    9. 85% of the time, it would bind. Anytime I tightened it, the bolt would tighten as the gears turned until they were completely locked into place.

    10. Read manual again to see if I missed anything, nope nothing there to miss.

    Anything there look wrong? Are the gears and couplers supposed to be so tight they have to be tapped out?
     
    NoobCanuk likes this.
  21. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    122
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Cary
    State:
    North Carolina

    -Return to Top-

    I am able to get the jist of it. I learned how change gears and such with my old HF lathe. Its just some of the actual application I am struggling with. I have contacted Matt about it and ill see what he says. Im hoping to get it sorted out because most everything else on the machine is awesome.
     
  22. GA Gyro

    GA Gyro H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    156
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Atlanta
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

    I purchased a mill and lathe from Matt... both were Taiwanese (cost more, higher quality).
    Even the Taiwanese machines come with dismal manuals (there are ways to get around this with some googling).
    And yeah... there were some mechanical things to fix...
    It is one of those things... if one wants the quality of industrial grade machines...
    They can choose between a new Lexus or a machine... because they are gonna cost about the same...
    Otherwise... figure on doing some detail work to get things the way you want them.

    Locally, I have some friends who have vintage American iron in their shops... and yeah, they have to do 'creative' stuff to keep them running also... and some vintage American iron does NOT have ANY paperwork available... none at all.

    It is the nature of the beast... however when one embraces the fiddling, one ends up with a better suited (to them) machine than anything on the market...

    Call it customizing... [grin]... just part of having a hobby metal working shop... :)
     
    JimDawson likes this.
  23. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    122
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Cary
    State:
    North Carolina

    -Return to Top-

    I think I went into the new machine with the wrong attitude. When I bought the HF lathe, I figured I wouldn't be able to get it working for a few weeks, that HF would provide me with next to nothing on how to use it, and that I would break a bunch of stuff before I did anything decent on it. When I got this one, I figured I would be up and running right away since I already knew how to use a lathe and coming from PM I figured it would be a cut above the rest. I think the machine is nicer than all the ones I have used or seen, but the manual is the same. I think the difference is that Matt will help you figure out what is going wrong on a Sunday afternoon where other companies will take a week to get back.
     
  24. GA Gyro

    GA Gyro H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    156
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Atlanta
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

    IMO this is a good evaluation of purchasing hobby grade machine tools for ones home shop.
    Few of us are like Jay Leno and can afford (and justify) top grade industrial machines...
    (And as I understand... there are customer service issues with $six figure machines also... [oooops]

    IMO if we see hobby grade machines as a bargain with a few glitches... and just deal with the glitches...
    We will come out WAAAY ahead.

    There is a guy at the Gyro hanger that travels all over the country setting up large industrial machine tools.... mostly control and software issues.
    You would pull your hair out if you knew the stuff he has to straighten out. Many times, he has to find a local electronics 'junk store' (used stuff)... and custom make a few things... to get the machines up and running after delivery.

    Just one of those things... :)

    Having Matt available via phone... is a HUGE asset... not to mention Matt's attitude towards solving your issue(s).
    And generally, Matt's machines are a 'cut above' the competition of similar price... (pun intended).

    Best to you on your new lathe, I suspect after the bugs are worked out... you will have lots of satisfying productive hours in your shop!

    GA
     
    NoobCanuk likes this.
  25. Bamban

    Bamban United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    180
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Austin
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    If you think these manuals are bad, if you can read Chinese characters, you should read some of the translations done by English speakers into Chinese... lol
     
    NoobCanuk and JimDawson like this.
  26. GA Gyro

    GA Gyro H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    156
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Atlanta
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

    Would not surprise me...
    They hire the cheapest folks they can find... to do the translations.
    And folks get what they pay for.

    Funny, over all of the human race...
    Folks have ALWAYS gotten what they pay for.

    Hopefully folks will learn that reality and buy accordingly.
     
    NoobCanuk and wrmiller like this.
  27. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,716
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    The real problem is that the people hired to do the translation know nothing about the subject that they are translating. I have had this problem when working out technical issues on customer machines in other countries, especially Asia. In Europe, South America, and Mexico there is normally someone around that both speaks English and understands the equipment.

    It might be worthwhile for the larger importers to write their own service manuals and operation instructions. But that might be a huge undertaking. A manual written for machinists by a machinist would be a really good thing:)
     
  28. MSD0

    MSD0 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    35
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    City:
    Fremont
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    There might be a burr on the bolt. Also make sure oil is getting to the bearing surface. I usually tighten the bolt first and then insert the clip on top. You can use paper to set the mesh or just do it by eye. The gears should rotated easily by hand, but should be fairly quiet when running. Open gear lube helps as well.
     
  29. shooter123456

    shooter123456 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    122
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Cary
    State:
    North Carolina

    -Return to Top-

    Thats what I thought, but after getting them to rotate freely again, doing my thing with the machine, and changing gears again, the problem returned. I thought something was tapered and I was going the wrong way but that didn't seem to be it.

    Basically, everything stops fitting together when I change gears. I figured after the first time that would stop but it did so 3 times, even changing the same coupler with the same gears and the same bolt.

    I also try to tighten the bolt first, then insert the clip, but when I do that, the clip does not fit. I have to loosen the bolt, then insert the clip, then of course it binds because the clip doesn't fit.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2016
  30. MSD0

    MSD0 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    35
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    City:
    Fremont
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    Might want to check the clip for burrs. I had to break the edges on one of mine to get it to slip into place.
     

Share This Page