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My New Grizzly G0678 Knee Mill

Discussion in 'GRIZZLY INDUSTRIAL INC.' started by DoogieB, Nov 15, 2015.

  1. wallyw

    wallyw United States Active Member Active Member

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    Found out last night that the rear panel of the green shield just slides out so you can Just remove the rest by pulling out the front. Powerfeed only interferes about 1.5" from bottom limit of Z. Once I'm finished installing DRO believe I will block movement below that mark and re-install shield.
     
  2. wallyw

    wallyw United States Active Member Active Member

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    Here's some pics:


    Been a bit of a challenge as there is about a 2 degree slope on side of the mill. Using sine bar and a little trig think I've just about got it. I'm installing the EL-400 3 Axis from DROPRO.
     
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  3. Silverbullet

    Silverbullet Active Member Active Member

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    Wouldn't take much to make a brake on the top , an up right piece strong enough to mount a band around the top of that pulley . Pop rivet a couple brake shoes to it. Then hook either a lever or a cable bike lever remote mount. Yupp new tool invention to add on , here ya go
     
  4. M1200AK

    M1200AK United States Iron Registered Member

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    I would hate to accidentally leave a wrench on the top of the spindle and turn the mill on.
     
  5. DoogieB

    DoogieB Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Welcome to the club! Information was a little sparse on these mills in this forum, but it's filling-in nicely.

    It's going to be awhile until I install a DRO on my mill, but it looks like Wally is doing some nice work on his installation. It's always interesting to see how different people approach the same problem.

    Another way to do it is drill 4 holes in the flat piece above the pulley and use a a spring-loaded pin attached to a upright piece that when released will enter a hole and stop the pulley. Doubleboost on Youtube has something like this on his mill. The advantage of this setup is that it's completely hands-free when engaged. The disadvantage is that you have to remove to pull the pin out when you are done. :)
     
  6. Dman1114

    Dman1114 United States Active User Active Member

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    Looking Good!!! Mine is sitting on the bench I'm still in the planning process....

    Thanks for the Pics wally...
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2015
  7. randyjaco

    randyjaco Reserved Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    That is way too clean. It definitely needs to be used. Enjoy
    Randy
     
  8. wallyw

    wallyw United States Active Member Active Member

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    Don't need a brake on the spindle. Look at the bottom of spindle. 2 flats 40mm apart. I bought a 40mm spanner from Amazon for about $10. Little tight so tok a light file cut on each side of the spanner. Works great!
     
  9. bri_man57

    bri_man57 United States Swarf Registered Member

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    Apparently I'm so new so I dont have permission to view media, let me post a little more and see if it populates :chunky:

    Thanks! It's definitely a nice Taiwanese Mill, I'm in the setup phase right now, just got leveling mounts for it and then I want to tackle the DRO sooner than later. I have one, just a little intimidated by the install.

    When
    researching, I didn't find a ton of information on this mill, but everything I found was positive and apparently somewhere there is a strong following for this guy. Haven't found it yet. :chagrin:
     
  10. wallyw

    wallyw United States Active Member Active Member

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    After putzing around for 5 days succeeded in getting Z axis installed on the knee. Had some paint come off. Guess I'll call Grizzly for some touch up paint.

    Zaxis 5.jpg Zaxis 6.jpg
     
  11. DoogieB

    DoogieB Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I recently finished installing an X power feed on the G0678 mill and I took a bunch of pictures.

    feed_2.jpg

    This power feed came from Enco when they had their latest sale. It's marked made in Taiwan, seems nicely made and was $225 shipped which is a pretty good deal.

    feed_3.jpg

    Here's the stock hand wheel and dial arrangement on the G0678 mill. This mill is a bit different then it's other 6x26 cousins in that the dial rests on the hand wheel. Also the leadscrew is threaded on the end and a nut helps fasten the hand wheel in addition to the wheel's setscrew on the key.

    feed_4.jpg

    This is what's left after removing the handwheel nut and setscrew, the dial and two socket-head screws to remove the collar. The diameter of the larger part of the leadscrew towards the left is .786. The power feed needle bearings and race rest on this part of the leadscrew.

    feed_5.jpg

    The kit contains shims and a spacer, but I needed a longer one. Sometimes the mill makes parts for the lathe and sometimes the lathe makes parts for the mill. It's the shop circle of life. :)
    feed_6.jpg

    The spacer I made is on the left. The race of the needle bearing is now flush with the end of the larger part of the leadscrew.

    feed_7.jpg

    And here's the power feed sitting on the leadscrew. I didn't have to drill or widen any holes, the ones on the mill and the power feed lined-up. For now, the power feed is attached with two metric hex head bolts. If the feed loosens-up and moves around, I will drill two additional holes in the mill for roll pins.

    I believe the narrow keyway is 1/8" as the first one I picked out of the assortment fit. The keyway is the same width on the leadscrew and the brass bevel gear.

    You set the backlash between the bevel gear and bevel pinion with shims. Don't bind the gears-up or you will eventually burn out the feed which isn't explained very well in the almost useless manual.

    feed_8.jpg

    The brass bevel gear is way too long. This is the FIRST cut I did on the gear using the lathe. I used the parting tool until I hit the keyway, then a hacksaw to finish the cut. I was a bit worried at first about banging-up the teeth on the gear, but didn't have any troubles. You don't need to crank the chuck down that hard as you are only cutting brass. When the bevel gear is the correct length it should touch the installed hand wheel as this is what holds it against the pinion.

    feed_9.jpg

    And here it is finished! NOT. Dang it. The power feed is where it needs to be at the left and so is the hand wheel on the right. You can't slide the wheel in any more as there's only so much thread at the end of the shaft for the nut and of course you also have the hand wheel key. The dial rests on the wheel so that can't move to the left either.

    This one had me stumped for a bit, but I figured it out. The kit gives you a knurled steel collar that threads onto the brass bevel gear. On many installs the dials goes on and then the threaded collar. That's not going to work here but the collar is useful to fit inside the dial as a rest. Luckily it's diameter is a more than needed.

    feed_10.jpg

    I didn't feel like threading an arbor for this, so I just turned down an aluminium round and pressed the collar onto it, threads and all. It actually worked well, when I was done I pressed it off and cleaned out the collar's threads with a wire brush. No harm, no foul.

    feed_11.jpg

    And here's the collar threaded onto the brass bevel gear. It was set into place with the hobby machinist's friend, red loctite.

    feed_12.jpg

    And then the dial goes on next

    feed_13.jpg

    And then the hand wheel. I turned a spacer out of aluminium that was inserted onto the hand wheel where the dial used to be. It keeps the dial from wandering left and right as well as looking better.

    feed_14.jpg

    I still need to install the limit switch junk, but all the heavy lifting of power feed installation is completed. It wasn't a hard job, but there was a lot of fitting to get everything just right.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2015
  12. wallyw

    wallyw United States Active Member Active Member

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    Job well done! Mine works fine. On mine I had to get some 3mm key stock for a perfect fit. I'm working on a spacer to pretty things up a bit. Busy now installing 3 axis DRO Pro. Not likely to use the dial any way :)
     
  13. wrmiller

    wrmiller Chief Tinkerer H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Dials? We don't need no stinkin' dials! :cautious: :D
     
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  14. David VanNorman

    David VanNorman United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Good neat job.
     
  15. Dman1114

    Dman1114 United States Active User Active Member

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    I put the limit switch stuff on mine.... But i think I'm gonna take it off. I have to put the Dro scale there.... don't wanna loose the room in the back.

    where do u plan to put your scale?
     
  16. Silverbullet

    Silverbullet Active Member Active Member

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    Put it in the bathroom like everyone else,ha ha.
     
  17. coolidge

    coolidge United States Active User Active Member

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    Very clean install I like it.
     
  18. wallyw

    wallyw United States Active Member Active Member

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    I felt the same way about loosing some Y on the back. Mounted my vice with the fixed jaw pushed back so that it was just under center of spindle. Found out that the vice stuck out further than any scale/read head. Those limit switches are very important so I installed them Adjusted so no damage to powerfeed could occur. I'll put the X axis scale across the back.

    Wally
     
  19. DoogieB

    DoogieB Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I spent extra time and money to find a vise with very little overhand on the back of the table so the last thing I'll do is put the scale back there.

    The RF45 mills have the same issue with the X scale, so if you search around you can find several ideas. My tentative plan is to put the scale on some risers on the front, but you probably need to re-engineer the factory switch setup to take up less space (width). Don't forget you need to access the table locks.

    I don't believe eliminating the power feed limit switches on a mill is that big a deal, after all with a lathe you have a much greater chance of striking the chuck with the compound or crashing the lathe while threading to a shoulder if you are a clumsy idiot. Both of these will do more damage than stripping the pinion gear in the feed. Nevertheless, with some time I think I can get the limit switches installed and not be in the way of the upcoming DRO installation.

    By the way, that DRO installation for me is going to be several months in the future as I have some projects I want to finish as well as just doing something besides working on machinery. Besides, that will give me plenty of time to check-out what you guys come-up with. :eagerness:
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2015
  20. DoogieB

    DoogieB Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Since it turned out to be a relatively easy job, I installed the limit switch for the mill today so the feed install is now complete.

    After removing the center limit block from the table, I took the factory switch plate and made it flat, cut some of the top off and then drilled and tapped new holes for the switch box.

    feed_switch.jpg

    The feed kit has spring-loaded stops to protect the switch box from over-travel but they are large and unnecessary with this small mill. In the picture I ran the table into the limit switch at full balls-out speed and there is still travel in the switch. Also, the table has overtravel stops that work against the knee so if you set the adjustable limit stops correctly, when the switch bottoms-out the table overtravel stop will help save the switch box.

    Actually got to make some chips with the mill today and I really enjoyed having the power feed. It's a labor saver and a really nice upgrade.
     
  21. wallyw

    wallyw United States Active Member Active Member

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    Very nicely done!

    Wally
     
  22. coolidge

    coolidge United States Active User Active Member

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    I'm mounting my X scale on the front to avoid losing Y travel, plus I retained use of the limit switch and table stops. Its not my intention to hijack the OP's thread here, but just to give you guys some ideas since I'm in the middle of this install.

    In this pic I have mounted my scale to some 2.5 inch x .5 inch aluminum bar, turned a couple of brass spacers on my lathe, and ordered some stainless T nuts for the front of the table from McMastercarr.



    Here you see how I have mounted the scale forward from the front of the table with the brass spacers, providing room for the limit switch and table stops.



    Here is the first part of the bracket for the scale read head, this bolts on over the top of the limit switch using the same holes.



    Here you see the bracket bolted in place, this brings me out just beyond the surface of the scale. Next I'll make a bracket that goes up, allowing adjustment up/down, then a bracket that the read head will bolt to that will adjust in/out and I'm done. Note I had to machine a channel in the bottom of this bracket for the limit switch cable. Anyway again just giving you guys some ideas.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 22, 2017
  23. coolidge

    coolidge United States Active User Active Member

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    Doogie if you like the X power feed consider power feeds for Y and Z. I installed all three and love it. The Z power feed is slow enough that you can adjust Z as slow as .001 per second. Except for drilling or plunge hogging I have locked my quill into place and use the Z power feed to adjust depth as I'm machining.
     
  24. DoogieB

    DoogieB Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    That's a great install, Coolidge! I'm always looking for clear pictures of scale installs for ideas.
     
  25. coolidge

    coolidge United States Active User Active Member

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    I wrapped up the X scale read head brackets this weekend, I machined the back side of the bracket to get it close then shimmed .025 to get the proper clearance between the read head and the scale, the kit includes a plastic .017 strip you put between the read head and scale to adjust to the right clearance then pull out the strip.

    So this bracket adjusts in/out via shims which required some accurate measuring and machining but this kept the bracket compact and tight. I had intended to make a three piece bracket where the top piece would adjust in/out via a slotted channel but I found that would have stuck out quite a bit farther.

    Again this is just to give you guys some ideas on a front X scale install vs a rear.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 22, 2017
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  26. wallyw

    wallyw United States Active Member Active Member

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    Very well done! I'm finishing up my Y axis. Only left with X. Looking at your beautiful install I may rethink mounting to the front.

    BTW can you describe and name your power Z?

    Wally
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 22, 2017
  27. coolidge

    coolidge United States Active User Active Member

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    All three of my power feeds are Align brand purchased at Enco.
     
  28. DoogieB

    DoogieB Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Hey Coolidge, from where did you buy your DRO?
     
  29. DoogieB

    DoogieB Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Just wanted to post a picture of the G0678 mill using a slitting saw. It wouldn't have hurt to run the blade a bit slower, but I just wanted to show the mill working fine under a light load at a relatively slow speed. The VFD really works well on this machine. It's so nice to just dial-in the speed you need without moving belts or shifting gears. Spot the hole at one speed, drill at another and change it again to de-burr with a reamer. Sweet.

    mill_slitting.jpg

    There's no screaming cooling fan on the VFD either. Apparently the cast column functions pretty well as a heat sink, although I have yet to pull the panel and take a peek back in there.
     
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  30. DoogieB

    DoogieB Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    It's been awhile since I posted anything on the G0678 mill as I've just been using it for various projects. I just did a small mod/upgrade and thought that it might be interesting for other mill owners so here it is.

    I like using stops for repetitive operations and one on the quill can come in very handy. Unfortunately, like most mills and drill presses the stop is just a knurled nut and it can take quite a few twists to get it into position. Quick adjusting nuts are available, but almost all of them are for SAE threads and all the threads on this mill are metric. The project is to make a new threaded rod for a quick-adjust stop nut. It's a simple single-point threading job on the lathe and they are always fun.

    During the last big Enco sale I bought a Morton Quick adjust quill stop (#1220-S).

    http://workholdingcomponents.mortonmachine.com/viewitems/workholding-components-nuts/quill-stops-1?

    It's nicely manufactured and made in the USA. This stop is for 1/2-20 threads.

    stop_1.jpg

    Here we are trying the stop on the freshly-turned 1/2-20 threads. You push a button in on the side of the stop to slide it up and down the threads. When you release the button, it snaps into the threads and you can turn the stop normally using the markings for further positioning.

    stop_2.jpg

    The mill is getting into the action by cutting a screw slot into the bottom of the newly threaded rod. Also got to use my brand new collet block and ER collets. Sweet!

    The bottom of the rod is screwed into the head casting. The threads in the casting were, thankfully, a really coarse SAE thread, I think 11 TPI.

    stop_3.jpg

    And now it's all together, with the stop in the parked position the whole way down at the bottom. I used blueing on the threaded rod for some corrosion protection and to match the rest of the hardware.

    stop_4.jpg

    The stop is now pushed up against the quill dog. It works perfectly and it looks nice.
     

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