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LIGHTING YOUR LATHE WORK

BROCKWOOD

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#1
We all make do with what we have laying around more often than we care to admit. I had a drafting table style of lamp that needed a purpose & my lathe work needed illuminating. That lamp, of necessity has received new aluminum brackets along the way - just to keep me going. This cannot last & since mine is a combo, it is only half the solution at best. Please share your lighting solutions for your own setup (pics welcome)! Of coarse solutions to my dilemma will also be welcome :)

My current setup soon. Sorry, dealing with a sudden death in the community. So share: I need ideas!
 

Bamban

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#2
I'll play. Here is my Jet 1024. The main light on that photography articulated arm is an automotive flood light. The overhead lamp is also an automotive flood light. Both are powered by a 30W switching power supply. Critique on this set up, I wish theae automotive LEDs were somewhere in the 4000K instead of the 6000K. The bright white LED just blinds me when directed straight to SS polished material. Good thing the main light is on an articulated arm, I can easily move position around.


20170302_003817.jpg
 

RJSakowski

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#3
I use the pantograph style illuminated magnifiers with an 800 lumen LED bulb. I welded up new sockets from a short length of 1/4" black pipe and some flat stock to replace the ineffective original sockets. The LED bulbs give more than enough light and the magnifiers come in handy for detailed work.
 

DHarris

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#4
I had not thought of using a magnifier style light RJ, GREAT idea (as my eyes are not what they used to be).
 

Silverbullet

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#5
I still have 4' florescent lights over my machines and a smaller one on them. I'm thinking of getting a couple of the new ones to try .
 

RandyWilson

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#6
I have 6 30W LED landscaping lights mounted to the ceiling joists. Two pointed at the lathe, two pointed at the mill, and two to be placed at a later date (I'm thinking drop-down gooseneck). 2700Lm per. I tried the 6000K lights, but the glare was intense. So those are now in the sewing room, and I have 3000K. China.com, $20 ea shipped.
 

Splat

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#7
I use this SnapOn LED worklight I got from Amazon. Thing's like having an airplane headlight over my lathe and it doesn't get hot. Slightly warm but nothing like a halogen.
 

NCjeeper

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#9
Stupid photobucket stopped the transfer of photos.
 

Tozguy

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#10
Just a reminder that fluorescent lights strobe at 60 cycles per second and can make moving parts look like they are stopped.
When a moving part is turning at a speed in harmony with 60 cycles per second (or 3600 cycles per minute) then there is a risk of being fooled. For example, a four jaw chuck turning at 360 or 720 rpm etc. That's the reason I do not use fluorescent lights too close to my lathe.
 

RJSakowski

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#11
Just a reminder that fluorescent lights strobe at 60 cycles per second and can make moving parts look like they are stopped.
When a moving part is turning at a speed in harmony with 60 cycles per second (or 3600 cycles per minute) then there is a risk of being fooled. For example, a four jaw chuck turning at 360 or 720 rpm etc. That's the reason I do not use fluorescent lights too close to my lathe.
I remember when that was true. It doesn't seem to be that bad now. I saw a faint ghost when I placed a piece of white tape on a black Delrin rod and spun it in the lathe. I suspect that the phosphors that they use now have a longer persistence. Some of the newer fluorescent fixtures are using high frequency excitation which wouldn't exhibit the strobing phenomenon.

However, LED lighting has surpassed the efficiency of fluorescent so I am in the process of converting to LED lighting anyway.
 

BROCKWOOD

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#12
20170706_224916146.jpg 20170707_201342360.jpg

So, this is what I have for now. Yes, it has magnification, which is nice, but I'm wearing out the plastic pieces & slowly replacing them with shop made aluminum pieces. Still need something for the left side of the mill portion. Thank you all for the great ideas!!!
 

jocat54

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#13
I have a 4' fluorescent hanging over the lathe and the halogen that is mounted to the lathe. It all lights the work well, but will probably replace the halogen with led--it gets to hot.
 

WoodBee

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#14
Just a reminder that fluorescent lights strobe at 60 cycles per second ....
If my memory serves me right, it flashes on the positive AND negative slope of the sine, so actually double the frequency. That would be 100 Hz over here and 120Hz on your side of the ocean. Also, as mentioned before, this was mainly on older fluorescents, technical improvements in the tubes reduce these effects in newer tubes.

Peter
 

Tozguy

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#15
I remember when that was true. It doesn't seem to be that bad now. I saw a faint ghost when I placed a piece of white tape on a black Delrin rod and spun it in the lathe. I suspect that the phosphors that they use now have a longer persistence. Some of the newer fluorescent fixtures are using high frequency excitation which wouldn't exhibit the strobing phenomenon.

However, LED lighting has surpassed the efficiency of fluorescent so I am in the process of converting to LED lighting anyway.
I suspected that was the case. And as you indicated there are other reasons to phase away from fluorescents. Still I think we should be aware of the potential problem with fluorescents until they don't show up anymore at flea markets.
 

gr8legs

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#17
However, LED lighting has surpassed the efficiency of fluorescent so I am in the process of converting to LED lighting anyway.
Keep in mind that LEDs are also subject to 2x line frequency strobing unless they are powered by a well-filtered DC power supply. Most of the cheapies are not!

Stu
 

SergeNelissen

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#18
We all make do with what we have laying around more often than we care to admit. I had a drafting table style of lamp that needed a purpose & my lathe work needed illuminating. That lamp, of necessity has received new aluminum brackets along the way - just to keep me going. This cannot last & since mine is a combo, it is only half the solution at best. Please share your lighting solutions for your own setup (pics welcome)! Of coarse solutions to my dilemma will also be welcome :)

My current setup soon. Sorry, dealing with a sudden death in the community. So share: I need ideas!
Look at these... LED, IP67, very high build quality, ...
http://brightmach.eu




Verzonden vanaf mijn iPad met Tapatalk
 

markba633csi

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#19
IIRC the newer electronic ballasts like for T8 style lamps run the lamp at a much higher frequency than 60 hz and the strobing is minimal or zero. I think CFLs are that way too
Mark S.
 

mksj

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#20
Not a big fan of florescent bulbs, technology is antiquated, they are bulky, the light color is often poor, they do not do well in the cold, .... I am systematically replacing all of them in my house and garage with LEDs bulbs, just can't see a reason to use them anymore and they are less energy efficient than LEDs. I have used landscape lights on my machines in the past, either multiple LED arrays or a single large square LED in a metal housing. Landscape, automotive and ATV lights put our a lot of light, but sometimes it is hard to get the proper light spectrum (always seem to be too yellow or too blue) and sometimes they can be very bright. I try to minimize shadows by having 2-3 light sources. On the lathe I replaced the Halogen bulb in my arm light with a high output MR16 flood bulb made by Philips, which puts out the same lumens as a 75W halogen. I run a high output LED strip light under the back lip of the splash shield, so it provides very nice even back lighting of the whole machine and minimal glare because it is under the lip. All the bulbs are in the 3500-4500K range with a CRI of something like 90. The Philips MR-16 bulb and the 40" led strip light was under $40, they run off the machine's low voltage power supply. http://www.ebay.com/itm/PHILIPS-8-5...000K-Flood-Light-Bulb-75w-equiv-/191864159345

The lathe is under the garage door when open, otherwise I would add some ceiling lights. But the lights on the machine minimize any shadows. I also use a LED light bar on my mill along with a LED ring light, I find it very easy on the eyes and everything stays cool.
20170709_150821.jpg
 

Rex Walters

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#21

RJSakowski

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#22
I haven't taken one apart but I suspect that the direct replacement for A19 incandescent bulbs also uses a high frequency transformer to get the correct operating voltage. At any rate, I haven't seen any strobe effect on any of my machines. (drill press, drill/mill, and two lathes). My Tormach light is a home-built running on a 24 volt switching [power supply so no chance of strobing there.

I do have a couple of strobing apps on my smart phone and they do operate up to 100 hz. Beyond that, the persistence of the phosphor comes into play.
 

tincture500

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#24
I use the MR-16 shape LED 6watt ( LED 1w = 9w) from banggood.com with a 27 base -. The base screws into a standardc110 v scoket. Available in various Kelvin ranges tom

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