1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

    Dismiss Notice

Liang Dei Ld 1216gh, Picked It Up Yesterday

Discussion in 'A BEGINNER'S FORUM (Learn How To Machine Here!)' started by bobshobby, Aug 27, 2016.

  1. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    192
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Adelaide, South Australia.
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    DSCN7904.JPG

    Well it has finally arrived. 2 1/2 months ago I ordered a new lathe. A Liang Dei LD 1216GH, Picked it up yesterday (Fri) morning and installed it in my garage. I'm now a very happy chappy. I've still got a bit of work cleaning it up, all the grease they put on before shipping. The lathe comes from Taiwan, and is very well spec'd, I hope it lives up to the spec's, if it does it will be a beauty, Gave it a short test run nice and quiet, all the gears change smoothly and easily.
     
    royesses, rdean, brino and 6 others like this.
  2. DaveSohlstrom

    DaveSohlstrom United States Good bye Active Member

    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    never never land
    State:
    Yukon Territory

    -Return to Top-

    Did your lathe come with a 4 jaw chuck and a face plate. If now as soon as the budget will let you you will want to get at least a 4 jaw chuck.

    Dave
     
    jlsmithseven likes this.
  3. sanddan

    sanddan Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    615
    Trophy Points:
    93
    City:
    Damascus
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    Are you going to draw it up on cad now?
     
  4. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    192
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Adelaide, South Australia.
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    Yes 6" 3 jaw, 8" 4 jaw, fixed and travelling steady, face plate, with driving dogs. Live and dead centers, 3-5 Mt sleeve, 13 mm drill chuck Quick change toolpost And I already have a small dividing table. The first project is to make a vertical spindle milling attachment, as I don't have room for a milling machine. I also have a few HSS tool bits from when I was an apprentice back in the 60's, but I want to get some new ones with carbide inserts.
     
    brino likes this.
  5. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    192
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Adelaide, South Australia.
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    Not yet, I still haven't learned how to use the program, i'm hoping I can find a local trade school that will run a course in the new year.
     
  6. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    2,187
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Victoria, Texas
    City:
    Victoria
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    A Taiwanese lathe with the carriage handwheel on the right hand side of the carriage? I thought the English were the only one's that did that.
     
    bobshobby likes this.
  7. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    192
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Adelaide, South Australia.
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    Australia also did that and I think possibly some lathes from Japan. This model is available in left hand or right hand also available with metric or imperial leadscrew, as I ordered imperial leadscrew I automatically got RH saddle. Although it is set up for imperial threads it also has the 120 x 127 change wheels for cutting metric threads, and the full chart for both
     
  8. Franko

    Franko Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,010
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Richardson, Texas
    City:
    Richardson
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    That looks like a terrific lathe, Bob. You are set for a lot of fun!
     
    bobshobby likes this.
  9. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    192
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Adelaide, South Australia.
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    Thanks Franco, I hope it lives up to expectations.
     
  10. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    192
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Adelaide, South Australia.
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    Interestingly Ken, when you consider that the English invented the lathe and the whole industrial revolution thing, perhaps their design is the correct one.Then the Americans came along and decided to change everything, like driving on the wrong side of the road, refusing to use currency based on the British pound even changing the weights and measures. Now the whole world has gone metric and left you behind, Just kidding.
     
    mikey, doogledee, brino and 1 other person like this.
  11. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    2,187
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Victoria, Texas
    City:
    Victoria
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Yeah, I think the oilfield is the last place in America where Metrication is slowly taking over. Everything I have worked on in the past 10 years has dual dimensioning so the Chinese can make things to. Well to find out, it doesn't manner to them, they do it their own way anyways. In fact, on some of my visits to China, you will be surprised how much of the old Imperial system they are interested in. Cups, teaspoons, some use of fractions, believe it or not.
     
    bobshobby likes this.
  12. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    192
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Adelaide, South Australia.
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    While unpacking and cleaning grease off everywhere, I have discovered that I can't lift the 4 jaw chuck even the fixed steady is a bit of a task, and I guess my back isn't going to ever get any better, so the first project is going to have to be a lifting device. I'm thinking in terms of a small jib crane that fits on the tool post mounting. If it will lift 50kg that will be more than enough.
     
  13. 12bolts

    12bolts Global Moderator Staff Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    352
    Trophy Points:
    83
    City:
    Hinchinbrook

    -Return to Top-

    Bob,
    If you got/made a small jib crane and mounted it on a wall so that it swung out over your lathe that might be more convenient. Or an engine hoist on wheels. Dont forget that some workpieces in the future might be heavier than what you want to lift.

    Cheers Phil
     
    brino likes this.
  14. Splat

    Splat Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    99
    Trophy Points:
    48
    City:
    here and there...
    State:
    New Jersey

    -Return to Top-

    Bob, get an engine hoist. I never had one until a few months ago and I realize now that I should'a bought one a looong time ago.
     
    bobshobby and brino like this.
  15. Wreck™Wreck

    Wreck™Wreck United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,291
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Riverton
    State:
    New Jersey

    -Return to Top-

    Not really, many lathes with gaps have the hand wheel on the right as the rack gear under the ways ends at the gap, moving the gear train to the right allows the carriage to move to the spindle.
     
    brino and 4gsr like this.
  16. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    2,187
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Victoria, Texas
    City:
    Victoria
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    True in some cases but not in all. In fact, the one in this thread does not have a removable gap to the bed.
    I know they are very handy for threading such as on the English brand DS&G Dean, Smith & Grace lathes. They made a hollow spindle lathe that is pretty popular in oilfield shops over the years, many people like them for the handwheel being on the right hand side of the apron for fast threading chasing threads on drill pipe.
    Me after almost 50 years of running lathes with the handwheel on the left side of the apron, I don't think I could ever get use to running one with the handwheel on the right.:eek:
     
    bobshobby likes this.
  17. brino

    brino Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    2,206
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Almonte
    State:
    Ontario

    -Return to Top-

    @bobshobby
    Congratulations on the new equipment!
    It looks like a very nice machine.
    -brino
     
  18. samthedog

    samthedog Norway Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    181
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Hvittingfoss
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    I just checked the Specs:

    http://www.liang-dei.com/LD1224.html

    It's an interesting little machine. A spindle bore of 40mm is quite impressive. I was wondering why the top speed wasn't higher than 1500rpm until I saw the weight of the thing. I thought it would be heavier given the list of features. Very well specc'd.

    Paul.
     
    brino and bobshobby like this.
  19. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    192
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Adelaide, South Australia.
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    Thank you Paul,

    It was about the best I could find available here in Australia. I was very limited in size especially the length. 300mm longer and it wouldn't fit.

    But I like the 40mm bore, the geared headstock and full norton box for a full range of imperial and metric threads. imperial leadscrew, plus power cross feed., All hand-wheels have imperial and metric calibrated rings. What is not to like?

    I wouldn't have minded if it was a bit heavier but its fairly solid, and it's only a hobby machine not for production work.
     
  20. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    192
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Adelaide, South Australia.
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-


    That's basically my problem I trained on lathes with right hand wheels, and whenever I had to us one with left hand wheel I always found it awkward.
     
  21. MarkM

    MarkM Canada Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    30
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    St. Stephen
    State:
    New Brunswick

    -Return to Top-

    Good day or Evening. I have been looking at the Liang Dei 1236gh for some time which I believe is the same machine. I have two motorcycles up for sale to pay for a lathe a nd a Genuinely interested fellow is coming tomorrow with cash in hand and if so Mon or Tues I will be buying a lathe. For the money and knowing I need way too many things to get going it looks like a real nice machine to get going. I am a licenced Machinist out of the trade for some time and want to get a home little shop together and be able to challenge myself on my own time and money. What money?
    You see a fair bit of them in there second decade still purring along doing what it was designed for. So may I ask since there really isn't a whole lot of information about these machines other than the pm 1340gt. May I ask your opinion of it and has it met your expectation for the size of the machine.
     
    brino and bobshobby like this.
  22. ddickey

    ddickey United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    385
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Red Wing
    State:
    Minnesota

    -Return to Top-

    Is there an equivalent lathe available here in the states?
     
  23. MarkM

    MarkM Canada Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    30
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    St. Stephen
    State:
    New Brunswick

    -Return to Top-

    Eisen 1236gh and in a 1340 flavor the Precision Matthews pm 1340gt which is very highly regarded. They all come from a well regarded Taiwan Machine Tool Man. Been in contact with both about machines and both companies that deal with these here in North America seem to be top shelf companies as well. Going insane on the decision. The price justs keeps climbing and if I sell my other bike I may get an Eisen 1440E or pm 1440gt. Jeez that pm 1236 looks good too! Wait a minute that ones not from there but a darn good machine! Shouldn't be this hard to buy a lathe should it? Either which way I Can't wait to make chips again! Woo! HOO!
     
    bobshobby likes this.
  24. ddickey

    ddickey United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    385
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Red Wing
    State:
    Minnesota

    -Return to Top-

    What kind of bike?
     
  25. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    192
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Adelaide, South Australia.
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    hi Mark, I was not aware you could even get them in Nth America, certainly not under the Liang Die name, As I have said before I believe that some of the PM machines, The Taiwanese ones only are made in the same factory, and appear to be identical except for a few cosmetic changes , like different colour, name plate, The specs all read the same, and the machine appears to be the same. And they are made in the same factory. So my bet is they are the same.

    Yes, so far very happy with my purchase. I must admit I haven't really tested it to the limits yet, but very happy with low noise level at all speeds, parting off is excellent, as is general turning and facing. Tested the backlash on the cross slide the other day about.0015 and that is as it was delivered I haven't adjusted anything, I don't think it needs it.

    An old mate of mine, now retired, like me, used to sell machine tools, most of his life, and he tells me they have had an excellent reputation for quite a while.

    My only wish is that I had the room for a longer machine 16" between centers is fairly short. In fact the dealers here don't normally carry that model, the dealer had to bring it in especially for me, but that was no problem as they were just ordering a whole bunch of the larger models for the local trade school in Melbourne.

    Although I don't have any jobs in mind that won't fit. I'm impressed with the rigidity, the nice firm feel without being tight any where is a very good sign. These machines have a very good reputation her in down under. Many of the trade schools use them, apparently they are almost student proof.
     
  26. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    192
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Adelaide, South Australia.
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    Always a difficult choice. However for my money I'd be very cautious about any PM machines that come from China. I understand that PM stand by their products, but I'd be much happier knowing it was made in a more reputable place. The Taiwanese ones are, I believe very good.

    I'm not sure about the laws in the US, but here in down under land, our consumer laws are quite strong, and very specific. "The importer of any product is deemed to be the manufacturer, and is therefor liable for full warranty claims and even issues like, is it capable of doing what it is supposed to do, is it of merchantable quality, they must also carry appropriate spare parts for a number of years after the last item was sold." There have been a number of cases here where the importer has had to supply a complete new model machine because some spare part was not available.
     
    Tozguy likes this.
  27. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    192
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Adelaide, South Australia.
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    Actually 1500 rpm is fine except for very small dia. It could always be sped up with a larger pulley on the motor. I have thought of fitting an electric clutch from car A/C drive in fact two or more could be fitted with different dia. pulleys to give higher and lower speeds. I find the lowest speed of 70 RPM a bit fast for threading, it would be nice to have a divide by 2 and a multiply by two in the drive line. I just realised that would require 3 clutches, low Normal and High. but what the heck. I'll need a digital RPM indicator.

    Actually I was turning some 1"crs the other day using a carbide insert at only about 900 RPM worked a treat beautiful finish. I also parted off the same steel at about 600 RPM beautiful straight in on auto feed no bad noises no chatter clean cut nice finish.

    As far as all the other specs a very nice machine, and yes I was a bit worried about the low weight, so I built a steel sub frame out of 75mm x 4mm square tubing all welded, and the lathe is bolted to that, which sits on the concrete floor with jacking screws for leveling.
     
    brino and Tozguy like this.
  28. MarkM

    MarkM Canada Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    30
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    St. Stephen
    State:
    New Brunswick

    -Return to Top-

    Thank you for your response and have you thought about a vfd which would give you the ability to extend the rpm range. It could be quite extensive and add some torque with the right motor that would enable you to use the vfd functions to its capacity.
    They are light machines but put together well. Take a look at the spindle wall, spindle and tailstock thickness, the consistent look of the castings and has a good reputation for user feel with positive engagements and disengagements which to me is almost like riding a motorcycle. It should stir the soul, It's not just about the specs.
     
    bobshobby likes this.
  29. MarkM

    MarkM Canada Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    30
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    St. Stephen
    State:
    New Brunswick

    -Return to Top-

    Also if your worried about threading for now with the high spindle speed and running into a shoulder you could always turn your tool upside down, start from your undercut and run the spindle reverse with feed direction to your tailstock. Keeps your heart out of your throat!
     
    bobshobby likes this.
  30. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    192
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Adelaide, South Australia.
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    I believe then reason for the carriage hand wheel on the right is so you don't get all those hot chips on your hand when hand feed ing, it works too.
     
    4gsr likes this.

Share This Page