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Liang Dei Ld 1216gh, Picked It Up Yesterday

Discussion in 'A BEGINNER'S FORUM (Learn How To Machine Here!)' started by bobshobby, Aug 27, 2016.

  1. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Yes I have thought about VFD, and it is the obvious sensible solution to many things, I even have 3 ph on site. It just doesn't have soul, well that's the way I thought about. I would have to fit a 3 Ph motor but I don't think that would be very hard. Liang Dei even have a 2hp 3ph motor that's a bolt on fit, I could have ordered it that way, I just didn't think I'd need it. Obviously didn't think it out enough. I know it's crazy, here's me always telling people go bigger go better, and I broke my own rule. I need to find out more about VFD, will they work with any 3ph motor, how much increase and reduction in RPM can you get without damaging the motor, is there a loss of power, there must be a trade off some where?
     
  2. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Yes I have done that in the past where it's a problem. However if I take the easy route, and fit a 3ph motor and VFD, It appears to solve all problems.
     
  3. MarkM

    MarkM Canada Iron Registered Member

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    ktm 950 adventure and a klr 650. Both set up well for Adventure Travel. Sold the ktm 950 adventure today so I have enough money to buy a lathe. Huge decision for me to be doing this. Did not want to borrow money so they had to go. I am a newbie to the forum and will properly introduce myself in a few hrs. Today is the day or me start a new path and chapter heading for retirement. I don't have the time right now with contractors at the house to properly introduce myself but will later as I want to give this forum the respect it deserves and collect my thoughts a bit. I always said when I am ready to buy a lathe I will tell my story and say hello. Really impressed with the mental approach to the forum.
    All seem genuine and we can all learn from each other no matter what we think we know. Machining is such a vast undertaking one may know everything and yet nothing in another shop. Also Hobbyist are for real because it all come from within there keen sense of interest they may go beyond a paid employee and become true craftsman.
    I am rambling on a Tangent and have to run but today is the day and I am bursting so you get the news firsts. I'll sit down later tonight and start my intro. Thanks for all your thoughts time be safe!
     
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  4. samthedog

    samthedog Norway Active User Active Member

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    When I was in Oz I couldn't find a lathe I wanted to buy. This machine is really nice and is comparable in layout and spec to the Colchester line-up. Sure, it's a bit lighter and lower RPM but it has many of the same features like hardened ways, leadscrew and driveshaft, right apron handwheel, integrated locks on the tailstock etc. I have a nice Colchester Chipmaster and have come to really like those features. Does it have electric brake?

    Paul.
     
  5. MarkM

    MarkM Canada Iron Registered Member

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    In the end I agree three phase all the way with a vfd but that's just more money right now. Has the single phase motor been decent? I must say your machine has a nice chunky overbuilt look to it being so short. I would of thought but it does.
     
  6. MarkM

    MarkM Canada Iron Registered Member

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    Getting close to purchase my lathe. I Have made my mind up. The Eisen 1236gh. Had an Electrician by and cut some trees down to make room for a shed to help make some room in the garage. I don't think there is a machine in this size with the quality it has for the price.

    I am going with 3phase and a vfd. I will probably be a few weeks away from getting it here and then I'll take some time to go through it and I am going to start a thread on the purchase and if allowed I'll report my experiences with the lathe.

    When I started to look a machines I thought of a budget about half of what I will be spending. Now I want it all. A full rounded shop. After doing it for a living and been spoiled with machinery it's a hard thing to look at the prices to make it possible. Ya it's a fairly small lathe but it is capable of doing good work within tolerance and more than anything it's to help build the shop with what I can make. Down the road I would love to find a Standard Modern.
     
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  7. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    G'day Mark, The Eisen 1236gh looks exactly like my lathe only longer and it's a different colour. I'd be willing to bet that it's made in same factory. just as the PM's are, no doubt other brands also. They are all Liang Dei's with a different name plate. I studied the photo and specs for the Eisen 1236 and every little detail and every spec is identical to the Liang Dei.

    I completely agree with your comment of doubling the budget, but that's the way it goes, I also agree with your comments of having worked in the industry, and been used to having all the big toys, it's hard to downsize a lot. I would have spent more if I had the room, I would have loved to get a longer machine, Yet in all honesty I can't think of anything I want to make that will not fit, lengthwise in the 1216. As it is now, everything, bandsaw, chain saws, drill press, except the lathe lives in the wood shed, which is nothing more than an open ended lean to for keeping firewood dry.

    I'm not likely to ever be machining a long barrel for a rifle, the gun laws here have become so draconian that it just can't and won't happen. My only concern, and its purely academic, is the lowest speed of 70 rpm is a bit fast for some delicate screwcutting jobs, but as I'm making everything to my own design it's most likely to not ever be a problem.

    I'll be very interested in your experiences as you unpack your new toy and start using it. Keep us posted. I'm sure you'll be happy with it and it's capabilities.
     
  8. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Mate I would love an engine hoist, but like a lot of things, I just don't have room, even had to get rid of the bench lifter for my my motorbike, now I have to take it to the shop to get any work done, but that gives me time to use to the lathe, maybe.

    If you look at the photo at the top of this post you'll see that's the bonnet, hood in your language, of my car butting up to the lathe and I can just get the garage door closed. So I have to move the car out to use the lathe.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2017 at 10:41 AM
  9. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    You know there is a great advantage to having the hand wheel on the right side, you don't get so many hot chips on your hand, in fact hardly any, plus most of us are right handed, so it's just easier to use. If you've never driven a right handed lathe and it appears most folks in the US haven't then its hard to explain, But I have used both and definitely prefer right handed.
     
  10. Silverbullet

    Silverbullet Active Member Active Member

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    Good looking lathe, I like the hand wheel on the right , I've been burnt and cut to many times by them chips that jump in my hand when I'm not looking. All the other handles and levers are on the right. Good luck
     
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  11. MarkM

    MarkM Canada Iron Registered Member

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    I am pretty tight for space as well and have thought about building a gantry crane that I can take apart and tuck away somewhere. Just wide enough to straddle the lathe.
     
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  12. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Good idea, I'll post some pics as I get into making mine, I've got a few bits made, but nothing much to show yet.
     
  13. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks, I've never understood why they put it all on the left, unless some one in the early days was a left hander and then everyone copied.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2017 at 10:38 AM
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  14. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Cut and welded some steel today, making some parts for the small jib crane that will fit on the outboard end of the headstock. Went to take some pics, but the battery in my camera was flat, have to charge it up.
     
  15. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I think there is some sort of relationship between it and the English driving on the left side of the road? Just saying, please , no offense to anyone.

    Dean, Smith & Grace were known of manufacturing some nice cutting lathes in their time and still do if you can afford to buy one. And on most of their lathes, the carriage handwheel is on the right side. Not sure about the operation of the half nuts and the cross slide and carriage handwheel, sounds confusing to me. My brothers have operated them back in their machining careers and swear by them!
     
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  16. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    It is my understanding that back in the old days when men fought with swords from horseback, that it was customary to ride on the left side of the road, path track. This made it easier, as most men were right handed, to wield ones sword against an oncoming opponent.

    Somewhere down the track, after the American war of independence, American teamsters decided to change to right side of the road, probably in an effort to throw off any ideas that were British. and probably because they were friends with the French at that time, the French picked up the idea. The as Napoleon started conquering parts of Europe he made it compulsory to drive on teh right, and thus it spread.

    However today, most countries that were former colonies of Britain still drive on the left. The odd one out is Japan, never a colony, but for their own reasons continue to drive on the left

    The result is some 35% drive on the left and 65% on the right.

    By the way the Dean Smith and Grace lathes are somewhat legendary. During may apprenticeship years there were a few around my home town Adelaide, and although I never had the privilege. a couple of the guys I knew in trade school, had them in the factories they worked in. Rumor had it, that a good operator could reliably turn to 1/10th of a thou. that is 0.0001" Pretty impressive.
     
  17. brino

    brino Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Although the 40mm spindle thru hole should ease much of that.

    He's in Australia, so isn't his tool already upside down? ;)

    -brino
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2017 at 12:40 PM
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  18. Silverbullet

    Silverbullet Active Member Active Member

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    No wonder there pictures are upside down , there on the bottom of the earth. Not tapatalk it's yeng+ yang flip and look.
     
  19. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Yes the 40 mm bore is a great bonus, one of the many features that said this is the lathe for you.

    That's why we are called the men from downunder,

    But think about it It's all a matter of perspective It's only that the first map makers happened to come from Europe, so they put the northern hemisphere on top and the southern on the bottom. From out in space their is no concept of top or bottom..
     
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