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Custom Bicycle

rwm

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#91
Thanks guys! I love the keyswitch. Safe and effective.
R
 

rwm

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#92
I am pleased to report that the Cafe Racer has several successful rides on it without any issues. It runs about 26 mph on level ground. I have yet to find a hill it will not climb. It handles great and is very satisfactory as a regular bike without power.
I am working on a headlight to complete the look. I cast a housing out of aluminum:











It's 4-1/2" light and the housing is about 5-1/2" diameter.
Robert
 

killswitch505

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#95
Man how have I not seen this until now!!!!! Super cool man!!!! I really dig the casted headlight. My son and I built an aluminum forge last summer and have been melting cans when can. I'd really like to try and do some casting at some point.
 

taycat

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#98
http://www.roguehangar.com/bicycles...pringer fork brainfork_files/brainforkns4.htm
you might find this interesting.
have built loads of bikes inc one that used car wheel on back but lost most of pics only got couple left of ones my kids built.
the trike is my boys own design and he did some of welding as well as sourcing bits. ( was 7 at time)
handlebars are of a lawnmower he saw in skip.
springer forks made using springs from trampoline.
twinkle of atomic zombie did stickers for bike.
grey one was one my daughter made in afternoon.
t2.jpg chop 1.jpg
 

rwm

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For now....I return you to the original broadcast:

Back to the FTB. It is in the process of electrification.
New arrival:



This will be front wheel drive so the first order of business is to find a fork that I can mount this wheel on. I have an old Trek with an RST fork. This particular fork has a steel lower with steel dropouts. Perfect to handle the torque and I can also weld it if I need to. Unfortunately I took it apart to inspect it and clean it. I knew pretty quickly there was an issue when water started pouring out of the fork! I took it apart completely and cleaned it up including some time in Evaporust and a trip through the sandblast cabinet.
Here it is looking presentable and drying on the AC vent:



Seems to be structurally sound as far as I can tell. I thought about buying a new fork but I cannot find one short enough and I don't want to raise the bike at all. This one has an axle crown distance of 440mm.

Robert
 

rwm

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I modified the fork by adding a tab with a hole. I modified a torque arm so I can lock it to the tab with a screw. This will prevent the axle from spinning in the dropout and also locks the wheel in the fork. Much safer design I think...





In the first pic you can see my 21.2 mm washer. I had to reduce the diameter to nest in the forged impressions in the fork.

A little more sandblasting, some rust converting primer in the fork tube, and then paint! I plan to strip the stupid looking black rings off the motor cover too.
Robert
 
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brino

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....part of me says "judicious application of Maxwell's equations", but another part of me says "Magic".
-brino
 

rwm

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...part of me says, "will it run if I can get it back together."
Robert
 

rwm

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Using my lathe as a mill! Homemade boring tool. Angle plate. Needed a 1.125 semicircle to clamp to the seatpost.

1508033311588.png

1508033368942.png

Not completely finished but ready for open streets tomorrow!

1508033419308.png

So aesthetically speaking- should I paint the front hub black instead of raw aluminum? Should I paint the aluminum box silver-gray matching the frame?

Robert
 
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crazypj

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Did you mention the total weight somewhere? Is it uncomfortably wide across the pedals? I would have used a jackshaft and more conventional bottom bracket)
 

Tozguy

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Very nice work. Re your question on aesthetics, I am trying to visualize the aluminum box in flat black to match the trunk box and a spoke pattern painted on the front hub to match the 5 spoke rear wheel.
 

rwm

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Very nice work. Re your question on aesthetics, I am trying to visualize the aluminum box in flat black to match the trunk box and a spoke pattern painted on the front hub to match the 5 spoke rear wheel.
Interesting to do the box in black. I didn't think of that. Not crazy about the spoke idea since there are already conventional spokes up front.
This was fine to pedal before, but now it weighs a lot. The motorized wheel, battery and box probably add up to 40 lbs alone. I could lighten up the box but it doesn't seem worth it for a few pounds.
The jackshaft idea was discussed. It is un-workable unless you plan to build a recumbent bike or move the rear tire way back like a drag bike. I calculated I would need to move the rear wheel back at least 14".
Robert
 

crazypj

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Just had a quick think, I see where you could have 'foot clearance' problems with 'conventional styling but a simpler way would be to mount 'front' chain on left side and have jackshaft roughly where front of rack is behind seat tube. Cross shaft out far enough to clear tyre. Deraillure would need re-locating to accomodate new drive chain angle though. Maybe something to think of for the next one? (pretty sure that once you've built one special, you will build another?) :cool:
 

rwm

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Just had a quick think, I see where you could have 'foot clearance' problems with 'conventional styling but a simpler way would be to mount 'front' chain on left side and have jackshaft roughly where front of rack is behind seat tube. Cross shaft out far enough to clear tyre. Deraillure would need re-locating to accomodate new drive chain angle though. Maybe something to think of for the next one? (pretty sure that once you've built one special, you will build another?) :cool:
I'm not sure I am following? Can you elaborate? Since your foot needs to clear the jackshaft and the jackshaft needs to clear the tire I can't see any way to do this and maintain conventional bike lenght? Or do you mean to move the jackshaft up vertically on the bike?
Thanks for your interest!
Robert
 

crazypj

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Yep, triangulate the chain line. You can use different sprockets each end of jackshaft to maintain heel clearance and set overall gear ratio. I'm always interested in something 'different'. I ave a few old BMX frames laying around, makes me want to build something but I already have way too many projects started (The re-phased' Yamaha XS'800' has been shelved for too long, plus a bunch of other stuff waiting for time or money, or both)
 
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rwm

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Interesting idea. Not sure about the clearance at thigh level. That Yamaha would make a nice Cafe Racer.

1508291608467.png
R
 

rwm

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Motor covers sandblasted and ready for paint:

1508291724711.png

R
 

crazypj

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XS250 or 400 in pic? (I used to work at various dealers in 80's) Nice motor, still have a cylinder head for 400 in garage (did a 520 conversion on one)
I've been 'playing' with CB360's last several years ('invented' the 378cc conversion and oil system mods to make them 'reliable') Collected a few XS650's, they are a lot heavier to work on but run pretty good when done, intended to have a 'tracker', cafe and 'mostly' stock (friends say I have 'too many' hobbies)
As a jackshaft would only be for power translation, you could use smaller sprockets (dismantle an old freewheel ) I don't remember where or when I read it but sprockets in the 19~21 t range are best for power transmission although larger sizes are more efficient (something to do with the chain link 'bends')
 
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