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Another Pm1340gt Build

Discussion in 'PRECISION-MATTHEWS' started by bss1, Nov 21, 2016.

  1. bss1

    bss1 United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Finished the second side table and tailstock tooling caddie. It swivels around the end of the lathe and tucks out of the way when not in use.

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  2. pstemari

    pstemari H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    What's holding up the caddy? I really like the trick of using short tubing cutoffs to make tray pockets.

    Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
     
  3. bss1

    bss1 United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    The caddie is held up by a piece of 1" cold rolled bar stock that was mitre cut and turned down to 5/8" that fits into the bronze socket shown in the first picture above. The bronze socket was pressed into the mounting arm for the side table. Here are a few more pics that should tell the whole story. IMG_1021.JPG IMG_1048.JPG IMG_1082.JPG


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  4. Silverbullet

    Silverbullet Active Member Active Member

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    Now you can build jib crane to mount in the box channel to load heavy work or change chucks. Extremely nice job , be proud of it. Thanks for sharing it .
     
  5. sanddan

    sanddan Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I like your organizational skills!

    Very nice job.
     
  6. zmotorsports

    zmotorsports United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Very, very nicely done.

    Mike
     
  7. lostapathy

    lostapathy United States Swarf Registered Member

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    Thanks for posting this thread - this and the build that inspired it are the reason I have a PM-1340GT somewhere in a truck with my name on it right now.

    One question I have for people who have built these - how do you level the lathe to the stand in the event the top plates (or the bottom of the lathe, for that matter) are not perfectly flat to each other? If you bolted the lathe down to a stand like this and it caused a twist in the bed, I don't see how you'd ever adjust it out.

    The leveling feet will obviously level the stand to the floor, but I'm nervous my stand won't end up totally flat and will induce a twist in the lathe when I bolt it down.

    Or maybe you guys are just better fabricators than me and can build the stand flat enough to not matter?
     
  8. bss1

    bss1 United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    This is a very good question. Obviously you try to keep things as square as possible during fabrication but there is no way to make the stand 100% flat and square on all planes. For me once I set the lathe on the stand I went through the leveling process and found I had one corner that was low. I had some .015" brass shim stock that cut to fit under the front side of the foot on the tailstock end.

    After that I was able to quickly level the lathe. This is how may cabinet mounted lathes are leveled like older South Bends etc.

    Here is the most important tip, you do need to seal the feet and bolt holes to keep the oil out, just don't do so until you determine if and where you have to shim.

    I really have enjoyed the stand. It has allowed more storage and the receivers on the end have allowed a lot customization that I wouldn't have with a stock stand. Additionally I think it adds rigidity and have not noticed any vibration that others had noted at certain rpm's.


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  9. bss1

    bss1 United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Well during the rainstorm preceding the recent flood here in Houston I was able finish my spindle spider project I have been pecking at. It is based upon the design that MKSJ shared with me. He also posted a thread on his build with a drawing and photos that are very helpful.

    I used my newly acquired super indexer to drill and tap the holes in the spider.

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    I had some 1" store bought brass tip set screws but they were not quite long enough so I made my own per Marks instructions. I made them with a step and a press fit to the shoulder. I don't think the tips are coming out.

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    I have two small boring heads but neither was big enough to have the reach for boring out the hole in the gear cover. I gave up on that and ended up utilizing a die grinder with a carbide burr to open it up, then finished with a 2" 80 grit flap wheel. I carefully worked to a scribed line and the hole really turned out well. You couldn't tell that it wasn't bored on the mill. The only issue was the burr I used seemed to clog up with the cast iron cover material which necessitated stopping to clean out the burr at multiple intervals, slowing the process considerably. It was a fun project and now my tach magnet is no longer taped to the spindle!
     
  10. Alan H

    Alan H United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    REAL nice, excellent, and real good! Turned out top shelf - congrats.

    I like it. Thanks for the idea on the knurled brass for lock nuts.
     
  11. mksj

    mksj Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Really nice work, and love the brass lock nuts. Having a spider makes a world of difference when dealing with long stock, if you put an indicator on the spider end it will also make the stock holder true when using a 5C collet system. Great work!
    Mark
     
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  12. wildo

    wildo Active Member Active Member

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    Really excellent job, BSS1! One thing I didn't see mentioned anywhere- can you comment on the benchtop height off the floor, as well as the spindle height? I have a HF 44" box and was planning on putting a PM1236T on there, which is the slightly smaller brother to the 1340gt. I am a little concerned about the spindle height being too high for comfort. I like your solution of using the smaller top box from the HF set. It would be great to know your bench height to give me an idea of where it might line up for me.
     
  13. Alan H

    Alan H United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Brad, What size thread are the screws you used for the spider? What is the OD of the brass that you used to make the knurled lock nuts?
     
  14. bss1

    bss1 United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks for the nice comments guys.

    Will, I will have to measure the height and get back to you. I followed the excellent and very detailed plans for this stand that were created by Sanddan which he published and shared with us here. However I did make mine slightly higher so I will need measure to get you exact figures.

    Alan, the set screws for attaching the spider to the spindle were 5/16-24 that were 1/4" long. The brass tip screws were 3/8-24. If you make your own brass tip screws from socket head cap screws like I did, you need a 1 1/4" length plus a 1/4" brass tip. Both screw types were hard to find locally in those fine pitches so I ordered them from McMaster. I wanted flat point set screws but even McMaster didn't have them so I got the cup point and turned the cup off the end. That made them about 1 thread short of the perfect length. Still plenty of thread engagement and I wanted the head to be below the surface anyway. If you go this route and want them perfect, you may want to get 3/8" length and turn them down a little more.

    The brass lock nuts were turned from 3/4" bar stock. I milled a flat on the spider that was the first size end mill I had on hand that was larger than 1/2" (can't remember the size). The step on the lock nuts were turned down from the previously mentioned 3/4" diameter down to 1/2" to engage the flat milled on the spider.

    I was previously asked about the flatness of the stand and leveling of the lathe. I want to add to my response that I was extremely careful when fabricating the stand to try to keep things as flat and parallel as possible. I tig welded in short beads to reduce heat and related warpage of the material. I also gang cut the legs and longitudinal stringers in an effort to keep everything the same length. Additionally, I was also fortunate to have a very flat table with a ground surface to fixture to. I really took my time with the build and just completing the frame took at least a month of free time in the evenings and on weekends. Even with all this effort it wasn't perfect and required some shimming to be able to level the lathe but I was very pleased with how close it did come out.

    Take care and let me know if you have any additional questions.
     
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  15. firestopper

    firestopper H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Nice work man, thats what it all about. Customizing your lathe will keep the clutter down as well.
     
  16. bss1

    bss1 United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Willdo, the stand height without the chip tray is 29". It sits on 3" leveling feet with about 2" of stick-out. Therefore the height as it sits is about 31". That puts the spindle height right around 48.5". I am 6' tall and it seems about right for me.

    Alan, the end mill I used to mill the flat was 9/16.


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  17. wildo

    wildo Active Member Active Member

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    Thank you!
     

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