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Which vise should I consider

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Tony Wells

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#1
A tilt and/or a swivel base will take up quite a bit of your Z travel. In all my years of machining, I've gotten by without either, although there have been a few parts that probably would have been simpler to do with a setup like that. We talked about compound angles in the tangential tool holder, and a swivel and tilt vise would make those much easier. They just take up too much room on a small machine for my taste.
 

Tony Wells

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#2
Well, if brief, the tangential tool holder has a groove cut in it that inclines in two planes. It can be done with some fancy fixturing/clamping, but a tilt vise simplifies it.

If you still would have that much Z room, there shouldn't be a problem very often, and you would have the advantage of that type of vise.

Most angle milling can be done with chamfering mills of it is an edge break or something like that. Larger surfaces require other approaches, like removing the keys from the vise base and clamping it to the table at the desired angle. Some parts can be inclined while in the vise by using angle blocks.

One distinct advantage to the tilt/swivel setup is on drilling and boring operations where you need a strong grip on the piece. If you have a swivel head, that's easy with a conventional vise or using the table and clamps. Since you don't, then it may be a great way to go.
 

Tony Wells

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#3
I have a couple of swivel bases that came with the vises, but I took them off.

Given that choice, I'd go for the tilt vise, because you can always spin a vise around and clamp it anywhere. It's just easier with the graduations right on the swivel instead of sweeping in the vise at the desired angle. But, depending on what you are making, you may never need to do that.
 

Tony Wells

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#4
If this is a manual mill, then a swivel vise can sometimes be useful, but on a CNC machine, it's not. If you are really good with both hands, you can cut an angle without a swivel vise.
 

Tony Wells

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#5
For an 8 X 28 a 4 inch should be adequate. I don't have one to part with, but you shouldn't have any trouble locating one.

Of course, if a larger vise came up for the right price, jump on it. Obviously, you won't need an 8" vise, so don't get carried away.

I don't know anything about Shars equipment.
 

rodburner

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#6
I have a 4" Shars and am very satisfied with it so far,seems to be nice and tight and constructed pretty good.
 

randyjaco

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#7
I'd go with a 4" or 6" Kurt vise. If that is too pricey, go with a clone. A Kurt type vise will handle 90% of your mill clamping needs. It is just the best design out there today. I very seldom use the swivel bases, but there are times when they do come in handy.

Randy
 

Highpower

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#8
Tony Wells link=topic=3128.msg22333#msg22333 date=1313562843 said:
For an 8 X 28 a 4 inch should be adequate.
Turbo, I agree with Tony. Your table is about the same size as mine and my 4 inch vice has done everything I have asked of it. I also have a brand new 6" vice still sitting in the box that I bought at the same time. I've never had a need to use it - yet. ::)

I don't have a swivel base or a tilt vice, but I do have a set of small angle plates that get the job done for me using the regular vice.
Just another option. :D

4 inch vice / 8 inch table:
Fits pretty good. ;)

th_P8040085.jpg
 
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george wilson

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#9
The swivel and tilt vises bend to and fro quite noticeably when you are taking a cut. Get the one that has the THICKEST swivel base you can find. I have used Asian vises for years before I got my Kurt. The trouble with many of them is that their swivel bases are just not thick enough. You can see them pulling up away from the table when under strain.
 

Tony Wells

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#10
Some are harder than that, and it's pretty tough to remachine them. Most would be surface ground.
 

Highpower

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#11
turbinedoctor link=topic=3128.msg22394#msg22394 date=1313627694 said:
Can a drill press vise work to the standards you seek in a mill vise?

Turbo
In a word - No. A machine (mill) vice is made to much closer tolerances than a drill press vice. The base, body, and jaws of a machine vice are ground to be (hopefully) perfectly flat, straight and parallel, and have smooth jaws. They also have a much greater force available for clamping onto the work than a drill press vice. You CAN use a drill press vice for drilling or very light milling on the mill, but they really aren't designed to withstand the forces that are encountered during milling operations.

Something you can do with a machine vice is to make your own jaws, and cut them any way you like. The jaws bolt on and can be removed / replaced. :D

Have a look at this video from MIT and it will give you a look at several work holding options you have for working on a milling machine. In fact, ALL of those videos in that series are well worth watching IMHO. Lots of good information presented about working with machines and tools.
 
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Highpower

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#12
turbinedoctor link=topic=3128.msg22410#msg22410 date=1313637384 said:
That answered alot of questions for me. ;0

Turbo
Yeah, it did for me too! ;)
 
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