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Restoring A Burke #1 Horizontal

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USNFC

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#1
Hey everyone,

I picked up an ugly little horizontal mill the other day and have began to give it a little restoration. I just wanted to share some of the progress pic's.
As received:
As%20recieved.jpg
As%20Recieved%202.jpg
 

USNFC

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#7
Thanks, yeah at first I was just going to clean up the ways, lube, and then use it...but I figured I may as well go all out while I have it disassembled. There aren't any machines in my shop that can walk the runway, but this one should look pretty good when I'm done. I'm more concerned with function over beauty, but maybe I can get both!
 

brino

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#8
Thanks for the pictures!
Very nice job!!! :encourage:

That looks very similar to an old Bristol mill that's patiently waiting for my attention.....

Please a little more info:
-any idea the age of the machine?
-does it have adjustable gibs for the dovetails?
-what is the spindle taper MT3?
-what (chemicals, tools, process) did you use to clean the table?
-what for the ways?
-what paint did you use?
-did you need to fill any casting lumps or holes? If so with what?

Thanks again!
-brino

(my Bristol is from early 1900's, it has a MT3 spindle taper, I got it from a local scrap yard)
 

USNFC

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#9
Thanks Brino.

To answer your questions:
-I'm not sure of the age, but I believe it is shortly after Burke acquired USMT. I would guess 1950's, but that is just a guess.
-The gibs are adjustable with sets screws and bolts to push and pull.
-The spindle taper is B&S 9
-To clean the table I used WD40, PB Blaster, a scotchbrite(by hand, not powered)
-For the ways, it took a lot of elbow grease, PB blaster, and steel wool.
-The paint I used was Rust-X machine grey.
-I didn't bother filling any casting flaws, or removing really stubborn original paint...I figured if it was that much of a pain, then it wasn't going anywhere under normal use.

Now, to add, I have used bondo before to fill casting flaws and it works well. I'm no painter, but what I have learned is preparation is the biggest key. I didn't do a professional quality job, but I did do a better than average job. Like I said, at first I was just going to remove the rust, clear over it, clean up performance issues, then use it....but I got carried away and decided to go ahead and make it pretty. My biggest focus is always making sure to do the mechanical and electrical aspects as perfectly as possible. I know some people wouldn't put a scotchbrite pad to the table, but I've never had an issue with it. I did steer clear of using it on the ways because I've read reports of impregnating the stuff into the metal, which will cause wear...not sure of the validity, but better safe than sorry. I will update with pic's as I progress. Thanks again for the comments.
 

brino

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#10
Excellent! thanks for the response.

Your reply touched on one aspect I forgot; electrical.
What size motor are you going with?
Any electronic speed control?

Thanks Again!
-brino
 

USNFC

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#11
It came with an old 3 phase 1hp 1200rpm motor. I was going to swap over to a 1hp single phase 1725rpm motor because I have a few in the shop, but I like the idea of having the slower speeds, so I'll probably just pickup a Teco 1hp VFD and put it in a filtered enclosure with a fan. I work as a controls engineer, so I can get some decent pricing on stuff with the company discount(company I work for, not my own). It also came with a disconnect(square D, if I remember right), an Allen Bradley ON/Off switch, and a Furnace switch that I will reuse. All new wire in seal tight, and SO cord for the VFD power. I also have a 1hp DC motor setup(Leeson) that I might go with, but my preference is the VFD setup. We'll see how much the wife lets me spend!
 

USNFC

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#12
Here is the motor plate for the motor that came with it... I have searched online just to see if there was any info on it, but found nothing on this model...the company is still in business though.

40e3dab1-c4d0-4274-a518-ed324a87c709.jpg
 

brino

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#14
USNFC,

Thanks again.
I have never heard of that motor manufacturer or the "fluid shaft motor"; it's like having a torque converter built in. Too bad it doesn't have a full automatic transmission too! ;)

I was considering a DC motor for my (eventual) rebuild. Maybe one from a treadmill.

-brino
 

Bill C.

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#15
Thanks, yeah at first I was just going to clean up the ways, lube, and then use it...but I figured I may as well go all out while I have it disassembled. There aren't any machines in my shop that can walk the runway, but this one should look pretty good when I'm done. I'm more concerned with function over beauty, but maybe I can get both!
I like the scrape markings after all these years are still there.
 

USNFC

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#16
A little more progress yesterday. I got the saddle all cleaned up and installed. It was a slow progress day....too stinking hot! Hopefully I will get more done today. I should have the table cleaned and mounted today...the top is already clean, just gotta clean/paint the bottom. I will get some more pic's up this evening. Thanks again for the comments!
 

mattthemuppet

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#17
wow, that looks beautiful! seems like you got one of those diamonds in the rough :) there's nothing like using a tool that you've personally torn down and rebuilt yourself.
 

USNFC

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#20
No, I don't plan to do any scraping...to be honest that's a skill that I do not possess. The scraping on this machine looks to be good though.

A correction to my previous post: I said the paint was rust-x, however it is actually X-o Rust...sold at true value hardware.
 

Ulma Doctor

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#21
the half moon looking scrape marks is what's called Oil Flaking.
the scrape marks are far below the machined surface to act as a reservoir for oil to collect and act as a bearing surface to reduce wear.
before reassembly it might be in your best interest to lightly stone the ways to remove any ridges where a tool or work may have dinged the ways.
the crater created by an impact of tool or work will slightly raise the metal from the newly formed crater that will interfere with a member sliding across the surface.
a fine oilstone ,fine diamond , fine ceramic stone with a little windex or mineral spirits will do a nice job.
personally i like the windex because it's effective and cheap- plus it smells a lot better too.
just be sure to wipe off any excess windex and lightly oil the surface as there is water present in windex and rust can occur easily
 

USNFC

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#22
Ok, got the table finished and installed today. Also disassembled, cleaned, repacked bearings, and reassembled spindle....and installed it. Here is how she sits now. 20150815_202411.jpg
 

USNFC

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#23
Thanks for the suggestion Ulma Doctor. I'll hunt down a stone and touch up everything before I put her into service.
 

FOMOGO

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#26
That's looking really good. You might try soaking the table in Evaporust to get the t-slots looking as good as the top surface. hard to say when to stop on these things and say good enough. Mike
 

USNFC

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#27
Yeah, I need to pick up some Evaporust...I actually intended to do it today, but got busy in the shop. That stuff works miracles. The best stuff for aluminum that I have found is Chem-dip.
 

USNFC

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#29
I got the arbor support all done...also cleaned, painted, and hung the counterweight(inside main body). I've also began cleaning up the pulleys, shafts, bearings, and things for the drive side.
20150816_200928.jpg
20150816_200741.jpg
 

Silverbullet

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#30
You should be very proud of this it's turning out to be a real gem. One of these days I'll find one too but don't think I'll go as far as you did . I'm a fixer up and user still never know I may follow your lead . Be nice to own a new looking piece of iron. Good luck with her.
 
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