• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
  • NOTICE: There are two new video channel areas set up, one for staff, and one for subscribing members. You need to create a folder. Then add your media to that folder. Once added, you can cut and paste the code at the bottom right to embed the media into a post on the forum.

    It works very similarly to YouTube, except videos are stored on our server. Click Here For The Video Channels

[4]

Restoring A Burke #1 Horizontal

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

USNFC

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2013
Messages
133
Likes
100
#31
Thanks Silverbullet! The pictures make it look better...I could have done the strip, bondo, sand, paint routine, but I'm usually not that patient.

Here is some update pics. Got the drive setup. Went with the 1hp DC motor (cause I have it, so why not). 20150818_205140.jpg
 

USNFC

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2013
Messages
133
Likes
100
#33
Also, pay no attention to my mess in the background!
 

USNFC

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2013
Messages
133
Likes
100
#34
Here's with the covers on. I still have to do another coat of black, but I wanted to see what it looked like.
20150818_213031.jpg 20150818_211407.jpg 20150818_211427.jpg 20150818_211438.jpg
 

USNFC

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2013
Messages
133
Likes
100
#35
All that's left is mounting the motor control and another coat of black on the covers. Then I should be cutting metal!
 

brino

Active User
H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2014
Messages
2,877
Likes
2,689
#36
That is freakin' beautiful! :encourage:

I will be referencing your pictures for inspiration when I finally get to my old mill.

Very well done sir!

-brino
 

USNFC

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2013
Messages
133
Likes
100
#37
Thanks Brino! I can't wait to make some chips with this baby!
 

eeler1

Dang, buggered that up too!!
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2014
Messages
361
Likes
160
#38
There's another thread here about stripping old paint and gunk, and I myself am getting ready for a filthy lathe rebuild/restoration. Just wondering how you cleaned up the castings and prepped for paint?

Again, nice job.
 

USNFC

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2013
Messages
133
Likes
100
#39
I actually used a small needler from harbor freight for the rust, and second and third layer of paint. Once I got down to the original paint and filler, it wasn't that bad, so I didn't bother removing it. I was hesitant to even call this a restoration, more of a clean up and paint. My focus was primarily on the machining surfaces.
An excellent read for a real restoration can be found here:
http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/burke-4-restoration-by-rmack898.21127/

rmack898 did this restoration, and Mac, if you read this, My hats off to you sir! Top notch job.

There is also a restoration here of a very similar USMT horizontal(a little earlier model of mine):
http://bluechipmachineshop.com/bc_blog/rebuilding-a-burke-1-horizontal-milling-machine/

Again, top notch work! Mr. Finch utilized Easy Off oven cleaner, which worked exceptionally.
 

USNFC

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2013
Messages
133
Likes
100
#40
Also, I have a couple more machines coming in for a real restoration that I plan to post up here in the next couple of weeks. Keep your eyes peeled for a restoration of a Hardinge BB4 horizontal(cute little bugger), and a Standard Modern 1340 lathe. I have far more projects than time, so it may be a little slower moving! It's a greasy messy tedious job, but I love it. I think for me it's almost more fun working on machines than using them(I enjoy that too though) haha.

-Steve
 

USNFC

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2013
Messages
133
Likes
100
#41
Alright, got the motor control mounted and fired her up. It runs smooth and quiet. I have some cutters on their way too me, so should be able to cut some steel next week! 20150819_193638.jpg
 

USNFC

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2013
Messages
133
Likes
100
#42
I ran it for about 30 minutes and the bearing temp was 88*F...which isn't much higher than ambiant...looks good to me. I didn't mention this, but I used Kluber grease in the spindle...expensive, but good stuff.
 

Fortis64

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2016
Messages
49
Likes
26
#43
I'm a bit late to the party ,brilliant restoration and interesting looking mill . I'm in the process of refurbishing a little Centec 2 horizontal mill . Biggest outlay to date were the Timken tapered roller bearings , cost more than I paid for the mill :)......Anyways looking forward to seeing your mill cutting some chips ....

Sean
 

brino

Active User
H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2014
Messages
2,877
Likes
2,689
#44
I'm a bit late to the party ,brilliant restoration and interesting looking mill . I'm in the process of refurbishing a little Centec 2 horizontal mill . Biggest outlay to date were the Timken tapered roller bearings , cost more than I paid for the mill :)......Anyways looking forward to seeing your mill cutting some chips .... Sean
Hi Sean, I am sure there are many people here that would love to see your restoration.....I know I would!
Please feel free to start a new thread and share whatever you can.
Don't worry if it's slow progress most of us have been there.
I bet you will get lots of useful advice and perhaps find some others that have the same machine.

-brino
 

Glenn Brooks

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2014
Messages
657
Likes
694
#45
Very nice looking machine. Great job on the restore. I've never quite understood D.C. Motors on these machines. So, Can you run a D.C. Motor at any speed, with no change in torque? If so, what kind of controller did you use with the motor? And how do you estimate the actual pulley speeds produced by the motor?

Sorry for all the questions. Always,wondered why D.C. Motors aren't used more in these applications.

Thanks
Glenn
 

USNFC

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2013
Messages
133
Likes
100
#46
Sean, thank you for the compliments. I actually got the tooling in and made chips for a few week, then sold the mill. It would be ideal for certain scenarios, however for my little hobby shop it wasn't going to be used too much.

Glenn, I used the DC motor just because I had one on hand. In my opinion, DC motors are a very viable alternative. I think people just know and trust AC motors with a VFD more due to them being used more in manufactured equipment. DC motors retain torque better at low speeds in my experience, and are quieter. Typically DC motors and controllers are cheaper than a VFD/AC motor combo. For quick reversing applications, I think an AC motor/VFD is better...but how often do you use that on a horizontal mill (I'm thinking in the ballpark of never). Now if you were doing a lot of tapping, then I'd stick with AC and VFD. For some reason every time I see this come up, it is a very heated discussion...which is odd to me. For my setup, I used a Leeson speed controller, but there are a bunch of brands. Typically you find 90V or 180V permanent magnet motors, so make sure the controller matches the motor voltage. As far as pulley speed goes, on this particular machine I didn't have a clue. I just adjusted speed based on the sound of the cutter. On my millrite mill, I adapted a Baldor 3 phase AC motor and a VFD. For this I bought a cheap digital tachometer with a hall effect sensor and attached the magnet to the very top of the quill shaft. (like this one: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Blue-4-Digi...856941&hash=item3d2f28d990:g:XMAAAOSw5cNYezt- ) This gave me the rpm of the quill, so for larger cutters you may have to do a little math.
 
[6]
[5] [7]