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Looking for a Slitting saw arbor

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Ken from ontario

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#1
I need your thoughts on slitting saw arbors.
I thought it would be easy to find something that's not too expensive and still does the job but guess I was wrong, all I've been looking for is an abor with a 1" cutting hole, for some reason all the cheap ones come with variable size holes and the main complaint seems to be "terrible run out".

The saw I'm after is 3.0" x 1/16" x 1.0", with 30 or more straight teeth, that seems to be easier to find although the prices range from $15 to $50 or more but I'll find something in between .
Is there an arbor any of you have had good luck with? what do you think of F&D tool company? I found this one on Amazon for $100 ,was looking for something less expensive but don't want to end up with a wobbly set .

I welcome all your comments.
Ken.
 

Ulma Doctor

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#2
Hi Ken
what spindle taper do you have?
there are some inexpensive R8 saw holders that work decent from Shars.
if you have a lathe and can turn between centers, you can make your own arbor too, if you desired!
 

Ken from ontario

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#3
The mill takes R8< I thought about making the arbor on the lathe but since it is a mini lathe I can only use cold rolled steel or aluminum, would prefer harder material .
 

Ken from ontario

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#6
I think it's alright but the deal breaker is the $40 shipping.I like the nut ,it can be tightened with a wrench ,no chance of stripping it, LMS sells similar arbor but it has a 1/2" shank which can fit in a collet:

3620.480.jpg
 

rdhem2

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#7
Cutting with a slitting saw is a rather low pressure job. Get a chunk of O-1 and make an arbor then you can heat treat if you wish. Purchase the desired arbor and screw thw two together. Final cut the arbor after it is attached to the purchased shank and run out should be minimal to non existant. O-1 machines nicely in my experience and is the most affordable of the home heat treat metals, A-1, O-1, or W-1. :eagerness:
 

mikey

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#8
This is a project that you can make on your lathe, Ken. It involves some boring and fairly precise turning but you can do it. Take a look at the Sierra American saw arbor and duplicate it. If you choose to make it, the fit of the nose piece, the part that the saw fits on, has to be a fairly precise OD. I should think it needs to be about a few tenths shy of 1" to allow the blade to slip on; the fit is pretty close. The fit of the nose in the bore of the arbor is also a close fit but you can do it. Make the shank 3/4" to fit your R8 collets and make the body long enough to be practical - maybe a 1" to 1-1/2" long. Personally, I would use 1144 Stressproof for this tool.

There is also a new one on ebay.ca right now that is selling for over twice what a new one costs in the US: https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Sierra-Amer...560948?hash=item2131640bb4:g:MikAAOSwk~NZ074k

See here for a new one. They might ship to Canada - maybe call or email: http://www.tool-company.com/shop/ge...rra-american-gen-purpose-reach-arbor-sa-1000/

You can also contact Sierra American and see if they will ship one to you: http://www.sierraamerican.com/slitting-saw-arbors/
 

Bob Korves

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#9
Make one (or several) to fit in a collet. The Chinese ones are not very nice and the arbors are pretty easy to make on a lathe... Don't get fancy and try to make one fit multiple size saw holes. It takes away all the accuracy. The best idea is to design them so they can be trued up with a lathe bit imounted in the mill chuck with every use, making them run perfectly true every time.
 

Ken from ontario

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#10
I do like the idea of making the arbor myself but tool steel is hard to machine with a mini lathe/mill.
 

Ken from ontario

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#11
I could make the arbor out of cold rolled steel . I have already seen and read on shop made arbor, it's definitely doable , could buy the blade and that's it. I think that makes sense.
 

mikey

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#12
First, learn to bore an accurate hole ...
 

Ken from ontario

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#15
Alan, that's exactly the design I was planning on copying, saw a youtube video of how it's done and thought that was some decent project I could do, thanks for posting it.
 

Alan H

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#16
Yes, I like the design a lot. I will tell it is not design but was given to me by a friend. His idea of having wrench flats on it are a big plus and allow one to easily tighten it down.

BTW, it is blued with Brownells and has been more durable than I expected.
 

Ken from ontario

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#17
Well thank you all for your comments, you helped me make up my mind ,I went ahead and ordered a 1" slitting saw and will be ordering the steel for the arbor .
 

Ken from ontario

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#18
Make one (or several) to fit in a collet. The Chinese ones are not very nice and the arbors are pretty easy to make on a lathe... Don't get fancy and try to make one fit multiple size saw holes. It takes away all the accuracy. The best idea is to design them so they can be trued up with a lathe bit imounted in the mill chuck with every use, making them run perfectly true every time.
I will stick with one inch arbor for now , keeping it all as simple as possible , if things go well, I like the idea of having different size arbors for smaller/larger slitting saw blades.
I know Mike mentioned to use 1144 Stressproof for this tool but what I have available is a piece of cold rolled 12/14 ,(will have to find out the difference on google),that 's what I used before with my mini lathe and it wasn't too hard to machine.
 
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gwade

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#19
I purchased three (made in the USA) on eBay and they looked nice. But the run-out was horrible (>.010"). They sent replacements and they were even worse. I copied the design and made my own that works fine. One caution is to be careful on the saw clamping surface corners to keep the corners sharp. Inserts have a radius. Some blades that you use are very thin so undercutting is not an option. I used a parting blade to get the desired shape. Good luck!
 

Alan H

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#20
Well thank you all for your comments, you helped me make up my mind ,I went ahead and ordered a 1" slitting saw and will be ordering the steel for the arbor .
Ken, I would suggest you buy some decent machining material. There's lots of turning, facing, and boring going on here and finish is very important.

Edit: missed your post above where you mention Stressproof
 
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Ken from ontario

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#22
Ken, I would suggest you buy some decent machining material. There's lots of turning, facing, and boring going on here and finish is very important.

Edit: missed your post above where you mention Stressproof
Alan, I have a 36" long piece of 1.5" thick CR11/14 that I thought I could use but the problem is ,it's hex shaped but I need to remove 1/4" from it anyway to get it close to the desired diameter for the arbor, it is very nice to machine with my mini lathe/mill, so far that's all I have used in steel, the rest of my projects are all Aluminum, I have not tried stainless steel or tool steel or any other harder materials with these small machines.
 

mikey

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#23
Ken, hidden inside this reasonably priced 1.5" OD piece of 1144 is your arbor: http://www.ebay.ca/itm/1144-RD-CARB...326831?hash=item48a48ca82f:g:d1AAAOxy8F1RFcUe

1144 machines nicely. Your inserted carbide tools will cut it, as will your square tool. It bores nicely with an inserted carbide boring bar and drills and taps nicely as well. If you rough at lower speeds you'll be fine. If you finish at the highest speeds your lathe will run at, it will give you a really nice satin finish. Easily one of my favorite steels. Try it; you will like it.
 

ddickey

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#24
It's too bad 1144 only comes in round.
 

Ken from ontario

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#25
Ken, hidden inside this reasonably priced 1.5" OD piece of 1144 is your arbor: http://www.ebay.ca/itm/1144-RD-CARB...326831?hash=item48a48ca82f:g:d1AAAOxy8F1RFcUe

1144 machines nicely. Your inserted carbide tools will cut it, as will your square tool. It bores nicely with an inserted carbide boring bar and drills and taps nicely as well. If you rough at lower speeds you'll be fine. If you finish at the highest speeds your lathe will run at, it will give you a really nice satin finish. Easily one of my favorite steels. Try it; you will like it.
Thanks Mike for the link ,(It's worth having a piece like that around if the price was right or if the seller would ship to Canada). I already have started machining my CR11/14 and loved how fast I got rid of the hex edges,it machines very nicely even with a small lathe. I used my HSS grooving bit for interrupted cut/ roughing, it worked very well but will use the carbide for most of the project .
Thanks for the tips on getting the best finish.
 

Dan_S

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#26
There is also a new one on ebay.ca right now that is selling for over twice what a new one costs in the US: https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Sierra-Amer...560948?hash=item2131640bb4:g:MikAAOSwk~NZ074k

See here for a new one. They might ship to Canada - maybe call or email: http://www.tool-company.com/shop/ge...rra-american-gen-purpose-reach-arbor-sa-1000/
Those are two different models though, the eBay one is ultra precision and the other a plane Jane model.

http://www.sierraamerican.com/slitting-saw-arbors/
http://www.sierraamerican.com/ultra-precision-arbor-2/

As an aside MSC's "made in the USA" arbors are actually Sierra American, I got mine there, and you can see it in the product image.
https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/08271355 I was an Enco custom convert, so its showing me a price of $40.97

 

Ken from ontario

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#27
I've noticed some of these arbors have T.I.R. of 0.002" and some T.I.R. 0.0004", that may account for the price difference of otherwise identical arbors.
 

Bob Korves

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#28
I cannot find the thread right now, but someone here on H-M posted an approach to making a slitting saw arbor that could be cut in place to accurate concentricity every time the arbor is mounted in the mill spindle. It was a great idea, and I wish I could find it now. It used the rarely heard of idea of using a milling machine as a lathe, with the cutter held in the mill vise. I wish I could find the original post to give the OP (wreck-wreck???) credit for the idea. It is brilliant. Cut a new shoulder for the blade to seat on each time you mount the arbor, using a lathe tool in the mill vise, is the gist of it. The blade will run true every time...
 

mksj

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#29
Easier to just make your own, but I guess it depends on if you have stock readily available. I used 01 drill rod for my slitting saw. I considered buying the Sierra American arbors, but they were expensive and the lower end line has had mixed reviews. I did not want to fork out the $$ for their Ultra Precision. I have about $10 of materials in mine. I suggest you use better steel for the arbor, but if you are just using it for small thin blades, it probably won't matter. The retaining bolt can self tighten to the point that it is almost impossible to remove. Putting a spring washer under the head helps.
http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/slitting-saw-arbors.62413/
 

Alan H

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#30
Like Mark, I made my own. As a matter of fact, I got my design from Mark. As always, he was willing to help me out with a sketch.

In post #14 above I attached some photos of it. I had intended to put this into Fusion and never got around to it. Decided to model it this morning and here is a drawing extracted from the model. This is one example and hopefully this will help someone make this one or gin up their own version.

A PDF of the drawing file is attached.

EDIT: revised drawing slightly, Rev. 1 now attached.

1510265658402.png
 

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