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[4]

I got me one of these! HASLER SPEED INDICATOR

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Finster

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#1
Well, I've never used one but I found one of these on E-bay for $25 and some change (shipping included). Meh, if it's a piece of junk, it will still be something to display on a bookshelf. I figure for $25, I'll roll the dice. This isn't the super duper ally ooper accurate one. This is the "Type A" it's supposed to be accurate within 2 rpm. More than accurate enough for me. Anyone else have and use one? Any hint's, tricks or do's and don'ts?

s-l1600.jpg
 

RJSakowski

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#2
Interesting instrument. I would guess that it functions much like the old mechanical speedometers in cars. The spindle is attached to a rotating magnet and the magnet creates eddy currents which create a force that works against a clock spring. The faster the rotation the greater the force and the greater the deflection.

As I recall, the mechanical speedometers were notoriously inaccurate. Hopefully, the Hasler indicator doesn't suffer from the same problems.
 

Finster

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#3
Interesting instrument. I would guess that it functions much like the old mechanical speedometers in cars. The spindle is attached to a rotating magnet and the magnet creates eddy currents which create a force that works against a clock spring. The faster the rotation the greater the force and the greater the deflection.

As I recall, the mechanical speedometers were notoriously inaccurate. Hopefully, the Hasler indicator doesn't suffer from the same problems.
I read a bit about them before I bought it. They are Swiss made and supposed to be pretty good. They have been around since the very late 1800's. However, your guess is as good as mine. That being said, I have never owned anything (measurement wise) be it a caliper, indicator, watch or whatever that was Swiss made and not accurate. I do know there army knives suck! :big grin:
 

RJSakowski

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#4
Remember having to check the calibration on the old mechanical speedometers for each new car that I owned on a measured mile using a stopwatch. I have never found an inaccurate digital speedometer. That said, I highly doubt that American car manufacturers used Swiss made speedometers.
 

grzdomagala

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#6
Works great, incredible accuracy! $7.72 including freight.
How do you know it's accurate?
I have the same model - directly from China. I compared the measurements with diy meter (diy meter is not portable - builtin display for mill spindle) - they were 20% off. Of course diy meter may by the bad one - but oscilloscope says it's spot on.


Wysłane z mojego GT-N7100 przy użyciu Tapatalka
 

Bob Korves

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#7
If the Chinese tach works at all it should be essentially perfectly accurate, as a function of how it works. You could test it using a synchronous motor against the mains wave accuracy. The one I have seems to be accurate within the specs, which are extremely tight. Make sure you get a good read...
 

ch2co

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#8
I have one of each. The Hasler i've had since the sixties. Used it a few times. It works fine. Sorta neat.
The cheapo chinese one Ive had for 3 years and it works great. I installed a mac tach on my lathe and
all three agree. One requires a reflection from a little piece of reflective tape, one requires direct contact
with the thing thats spinning and one just tells me how fast the lathe is turning. They all have their
place. That was a good deal Finster enjoy and use a fine piece of history.
 

dlane

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#9
Hi Bob
Just wounding How those Chinese eBay tacks work , just hold it by the spinning object ?
 

Bob Korves

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#10
Hi Bob
Just wounding How those Chinese eBay tacks work , just hold it by the spinning object ?
You install a small strip of reflective tape on what you are measuring and then shine the light on it and it counts the revs as the tape comes around. It takes less than a second to get a reading unless it is turning really slowly.
 

dlane

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#12
Thanks bob , they are $10. Now but I can see one in my future
 

4gsr

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#14
Some of the older electronic tachs, we used to hold it up to a fluorescent light and calibrate it to the light. 60 cycle fluorescent light would read 60 on the tach.
 

4gsr

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#16
Anyone know where I can buy some of the reflective tape. All of my stickers that can with mine lost their glue. I did get a White paint stick to work, but would rather have the stick on reflective tape.
 

chips&more

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#17
Anyone know where I can buy some of the reflective tape. All of my stickers that can with mine lost their glue. I did get a White paint stick to work, but would rather have the stick on reflective tape.
Wrinkle up some aluminum foil and then hold that down with some clear cellophane tape.
 

Finster

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#18
Anyone know where I can buy some of the reflective tape. All of my stickers that can with mine lost their glue. I did get a White paint stick to work, but would rather have the stick on reflective tape.
You can get rolls of the stuff at lowes or the depot. The same stuff you use for driveway marking, mailboxes and whatever would work I would think.
 

f350ca

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#19
I have one made by Stewart Warner. Not as fancy or accurate but works great. I use it to set the speed on a DC driven tool grinder for different wheels. Or setting the governor on a engine.

Greg
 

royesses

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#20
Anyone know where I can buy some of the reflective tape. All of my stickers that can with mine lost their glue. I did get a White paint stick to work, but would rather have the stick on reflective tape.
Heres a few all are rolls except for Amazon. I used to get large rolls from cat when i worked for a Cat dealer. They might still sell the tape.

https://www.coleparmer.com/i/monarc...al-tachometers-5-ft-long-and-1-2-wide/0821062

https://www.grainger.com/category/ecatalog/N-1z0ccm0

https://www.amazon.com/RT6-Reflective-Optical-Laser-Tachometers/dp/B001TCWM3G

http://www.davis.com/Category/Optical_Tachometer_Reflective_Tape/5683

My Chinese laser tach is 12 years old and agrees within 1 rpm with my Machtach. The Machtach does sfpm and smpm too.

Roy
 

Rustrp

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#21
With all the chatter about accuracy this beg for the old joke I'm sure most have heard, but for those who haven't;

There's been a centuries old competition between the Germans and the Swiss on who produces the most accurate device, anything, etc.
The German engineers developed the smallest piece of wire know to man and sent it to the Swiss, with an Ah.HA!
The Swiss drilled a hole through the center of it and sent it back. :D
 

Rustrp

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#22
Well, I've never used one but I found one of these on E-bay for $25 and some change (shipping included). Meh, if it's a piece of junk, it will still be something to display on a bookshelf. I figure for $25, I'll roll the dice. This isn't the super duper ally ooper accurate one. This is the "Type A" it's supposed to be accurate within 2 rpm. More than accurate enough for me. Anyone else have and use one? Any hint's, tricks or do's and don'ts?

View attachment 231681
It's accuracy when originally made was probably pretty good and two RPM's is still pretty good. As a last resort do the math on something with a known speed. The ones I used when I was owned by Uncle Sam had to be calibrated or checked for calibration.
 

Rustrp

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#23
How do you know it's accurate?
I have the same model - directly from China. I compared the measurements with diy meter (diy meter is not portable - builtin display for mill spindle) - they were 20% off. Of course diy meter may by the bad one - but oscilloscope says it's spot on.


Wysłane z mojego GT-N7100 przy użyciu Tapatalka
20% off the price or 20% off on the readings..:D
 

RJSakowski

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#24
With all the chatter about accuracy this beg for the old joke I'm sure most have heard, but for those who haven't;

There's been a centuries old competition between the Germans and the Swiss on who produces the most accurate device, anything, etc.
The German engineers developed the smallest piece of wire know to man and sent it to the Swiss, with an Ah.HA!
The Swiss drilled a hole through the center of it and sent it back. :D
And then it was sent on to Japan and the Japanese tapped the hole.
 

RandyWilson

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#27
Old car speedometers could be accurate, if they tried. Witness the police certified units. But most were made to budget with aesthetics a primary factor. It's hard to be accurate when your entire range is covered in 60-90 degrees of sweep.

I'll put up a picture of the tach I found in the barn this evening. Accurate or not, it is an impressive piece.
 

Pops

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#28
I've got one of the Swiss models. Have had it since the 60's. works great


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

rgray

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#29
I would guess that it functions much like the old mechanical speedometers in cars. The spindle is attached to a rotating magnet and the magnet creates eddy currents which create a force that works against a clock spring.
These read revolutions for a set time. They do not show a constant speed when pressed against a spinning object. You press the end to a spinning shaft and hit the button to start the timer the hands turn for 15 seconds on mine, 20170419_063731.jpg and where the needles stop is the rpm read from both needles if above 100, if below 100 read from just the large needle.
 

TomS

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#30
What is the name of the app? I'll download it and compare it to this instrument.
I just downloaded Strobily on my Samsung. Will test it when I get to the shop in a couple of hours.

Tom S.
 
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