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How to lift a surface plate to stand...without cherry picker or crane etc?

Discussion in 'METROLOGY - MEASURE, SETUP & FIT' started by expressline99, Jun 30, 2017.

  1. rrjohnso2000

    rrjohnso2000 United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I would agree on the cart. You have a lot of good suggestions that all will work
     
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  2. expressline99

    expressline99 H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Oh no. Not super heavy. I am just leery of dropping things. I've dropped motorcycles out of trucks...I tried moving a rather large 4' wide hearth heater once... dropped that out of the pickup... There are several success stories. But the ones that didn't go well come to mind first. All stuff I did alone of course. lol I did manage to move around a 2700 pound lathe with a speed jack and some sketchy blocking... back before I knew what I had...and I sold it before I knew also! This stone still weighs more than I do and like I said I'm a bit overly cautious anymore. I even wear my jacket every single time I weld. :) The table idea seems cool though with a 20% off coupon cheap.
     
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  3. expressline99

    expressline99 H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    The amount of suggestions is great. I love this board. The experience here that I can tap into is wonderful.
     
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  4. core-oil

    core-oil United Kingdom Active User Active Member

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    What ever you do be careful, A hernia or a wracked heart ,or buggered back for a surface table is not a good price to pay, I would seriously consider hiring an engine lift, work safely a serious accident is not what yoou want, some years back I was at the displenishment sale of a pretty skilled toolmaker, who was working alone moving a milling machine, It came over on him & trpped him, Had it not been for a solid steel bench stopping it from mortally wounding him, It would have been unthinkable, He never worked ever again.

    I have in the past taken some horrid chances Two hernias later, I wish I had'nt
     
  5. kd4gij

    kd4gij United States Active User Active Member

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  6. kd4gij

    kd4gij United States Active User Active Member

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    upload_2017-7-2_1-35-37.png
     
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  7. uncle harry

    uncle harry United States Active User Active Member

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    That's what I did for my 18 x 24 pink granite plate. However, I had just recently purchased a 16 x 16 square top small hydraulic lift table on casters that helped the seller get the plate from his shop to my trunk. Two strong friends lifted it from my trunk to the rolling hydraulic stand. I use the rolling stand to move my Starrett vise & 12 inch rotary table on and off of my BP knock off mill and as a rolling tool bench for projects around the large shop. New the lift sells for $400 but I scored a sweet deal on Milwaukee (WI)
    Craigslist 20 miles from home for $100.
     
  8. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Paul, my 18x24 two ledge is 4" thick, and also weighs ~200 lbs. My neighbor and I just picked it up off the floor and put it on the stand. It was not a big deal. If you can each lift a 94# sack of cement, you can certainly lift a surface plate together. Just have things laid out so there is nothing to trip over or catch on, just a straight lift, short sideways movement, and set down. No big deal...
     
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  9. benmychree

    benmychree United States John York H-M Supporter-Premium

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    This illustrates why I like cast iron plates, no big thing to lift!
     
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  10. expressline99

    expressline99 H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    The plate isn't super heavy but since I've had issues down south of the waistline in the last year. I do not want to take chances. Kinda why I'm spending time making this easier than normal. I would rather make it super easy on myself than make that happen again. It was so bad the first two weeks when I tried to drive I thought i was going to throw up from the pain. There ya go group TMI :)
     
  11. rrjohnso2000

    rrjohnso2000 United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Then definitely set yourself up with a solution that works for you in the future. Way worth the ease of having something in your back pocket for that task you can't do
     
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  12. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I have had hernia issues myself, probably genetically based per the surgeons. No fun, but life goes on. Proper technique for lifting is always required. Never lift something that could cause you to hurt yourself (easily said). Sometimes a brace is useful. Proper lifting equipment can certainly make things easier. One "Oh shi*" cancels out at least a hundred "atta boy"s.
     
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  13. DaveD

    DaveD United States Active User Active Member

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    If it's only 24x24x3 it is probably going to be under 250#
    TQ60 has the right idea. It's not going to be hard at all. It all has to do with leverage.
    Lay two 2x10 pieces of lumber on the floor of the van. You will later use these as ramps to get the granite to its table.

    Put piece of granite on 2x10s back at shop. Tie some sturdy rope around granite to help pull it up ramps later.

    Drive home

    Ratchet strap table to back of van so they are one and will not separate.
    Raise near end of ramps up to table top height, throw rope that is tied to plate over ramps and over table. Use a 2x4 or something similar and wrap rope around it. Wedge 2x4 against far edge of table and use it as a lever to pull on rope. The longer your 2x4 is the more leverage you have. 4' is more than enough.

    Leverage and inclines are your friend
     
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