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Feed wire sizing to my garage

Discussion in 'ELECTRICAL ISSUES - POWER YOUR MACHINES & SHOP' started by magu, Mar 7, 2017.

  1. stupoty

    stupoty Active User Active Member

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    Not a penny now that's a total bargain :) I've got a couple of T8 LED "Tubes" I think you can upgrade to them when your tube gets dim. Presumably the current battery backup in your maintained fitting drives a 240v inventor so might be compatible. I'm driving mine with T8 end caps wired direct to 240v no drivers.

    (apologies for dragging the posts off topic) :0

    Stuart
     
  2. Rustrp

    Rustrp United States Active Member Active Member

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    There's no law that says it can't be done above ground (aerial) but the laws are are more plentiful on how you go about doing it. The task of getting the wiring into and out of the building are more complicated. Just one example.
     
  3. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    You can do as I did a few years back when I had my 20" L & S lathe. I ran 90 feet of 6ga. SO cord from the meter/breaker box to the lathe. Tied to a 50 amp breaker or I should say, had a 50 amp outside plug mounted on the breaker box that the SO cord connected to. Worked out nice. When not in use, unplug, roll up the SO cord, yeah, 90 feet of 6 ga. cord gets heavy, too, put away in storage. I have several lengths of SO cord that I use for various machine/motor applications in my shop. And yes, I use a appropriate amperage size breaker/fuses for each installation.
     
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  4. Keith Foor

    Keith Foor Active Member Active Member

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    Thought of something else. In sourcing a panel and the feeder cable for the main run to the barn.
    Find houses that are being torn down and ask for the panel and wire. Don't bother with pulling wire out of the wall but a workable panel is a workable panel. Also, if the house had overhead feeder coming from the street then grab that too.
    It will typically be aluminum wire but that's ok.
    It's common to be spliced together so if you need to get 3 sections and put them together to make it work then that's ok as well.
    Thing with joining them is they have to have crimped barrel connectors used to be done right.
    The tools for these barrels are very pricy so have an electrician do the splices on the cable.
     
  5. magu

    magu United States Active Member Active Member

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    So on the note of running above ground.... I'm putting in a fence that will run directly from the back corner of the house to the garage. While certainly not orthodox, would there be anything wrong (code wise) with running along the fence? Im thinking I could run ridgid or thermoformed pvc under the botom rail? 1" I could out a facce board on the inside of the rail to hide it, and it would be off the ground and away from danger.
     
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  6. jim18655

    jim18655 United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    No problem at all as long as you can meet the support requirements and it's protected from damage. PVC should have an expansion fitting for the length so it doesn't twist and bow and pull the straps off. Good idea.
     
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  7. tq60

    tq60 United States Active Member Active Member

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    Before spending bucks or labor make a few sketches and call them plan a to plan X and visit your local building department and they will give correct advise to what is required where YOU LIVE.

    It may be less work or money and be better too...better to ask.


    Another way to "cheat" is to use a plug in to connect.

    Say it is a 50 amp total then at the main panel install a 50 amp outlet and use 50 amp plug and wire to supply sub.

    Now it is nothing more than an extension cord...used that trick way back when inspector was having fits due to too many staples holding romex...Second inspector gave advise to circumvent first pain in rear inspector.


    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
     
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  8. LarryJ

    LarryJ United States Steel Registered Member

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    That's a great idea, Jim, and it wouldn't cost but $50-100 to do.
     
  9. LarryJ

    LarryJ United States Steel Registered Member

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    Lighting on one leg and outlets on the other is the norm, I believe.

    Ditto the suggestions to put in a load panel. A 200a service box is only $40 more than a 100a, too. If you're doing it yourself, you're already saving $500-1,000, so splurge. <g>

    I'd run 12/3 in the shop for the 120v outlets and 10/3 for the 240v outlets for upgraded welders in the future. I added three 240v outlets in my 2-car shop after moving in and they'll handle the welders. Looking back, I should have put in five 240v outlets since I have wood and metalworking tools. Instead, I built a 30' 10/3 twistlock extension cord later.
     
  10. autonoz

    autonoz United States Active User Active Member

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    There are so many variables when deciding what to do. With what your doing I would not go less than a 60 amp sub panel. Now you will need to go on line and locate a chart that will give you the size wire which I am pretty sure is #6 and what size conduit you can run #6 through. If you use EMT you will want 3/4. Do your research and do it right the first time. Definately run seperate circuits for your outlets and lights. 20 amp for outlets with #12 wire. I just installed a 100 amp subpanel with main breaker in panel. #2 AWG wire through 1 1/4 conduit. All my shop circuits are 20 amp and will also be putting in 240 once I decide where my machines are going to be. Make sure your first outlet is a GFI, then your others can be regular outlest run in a series behind it. If your pulling a permit make sure you follow code as it will bite you in the hind end later. Also for safety reasons. I cannot stress enough to do the research on wire size, conduit size for wire fill, and j box sizes for wire fill. Also make sure you are not running more conductors through the size conduit you are using if you are running conduit inside and multipe circuits through the same conduit. Ground all boxes and use seperate neutral for each circuit. You can share grounds with more than one circuit. Again if running conduit inside go 3/4 conduit for multiple circuits it will make pulling wire much easier than through 1/2"
     

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