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Federal .0001 indicater

dlane

Active User
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#1
got this for five bucks it is a little slow returning, any safe suggestions to free it up.
The fixture is all hardened
IMG_0828.JPG IMG_0831.JPG IMG_0832.JPG
Seems like a nice indicator just a little slow returning
Is the little hole in the cap for anything special
Gona need a new contact tip also
Thanks
 

mikey

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#5
I would try a drop of light machine oil on the plunger. That usually works for me…Dave
Not to disagree, Dave, but Long Island Indicator has this to say about a sticking dial indicator spindle: "The spindle should never require lubrication. In fact, when we repair them we make certain to clean them thoroughly so that no grease, oil or grime remain. It may be a better idea to apply a few drops of alcohol to the spindle. This may clean it, if dirt is the issue. ..."
 

chips&more

Active User
Active Member
#6
Not to disagree, Dave, but Long Island Indicator has this to say about a sticking dial indicator spindle: "The spindle should never require lubrication. In fact, when we repair them we make certain to clean them thoroughly so that no grease, oil or grime remain. It may be a better idea to apply a few drops of alcohol to the spindle. This may clean it, if dirt is the issue. ..."
Thank you. I would not reference somebody else’s recommendation, especially if you do not have you own. I have been repairing and making watch and clock parts most of my life. Indicators fall into that category. I will continue to clean and lightly oil the plunger, thank you. If you took that indicator apart and cleaned and oiled it. I would only oil the pivots and not the gear teeth. One must also consider the cost of that service to fix an indicator.
 
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4gsr

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#7
Get you a bottle of Starrett instrument oil or watch oil. Chip aught to know what oil is the best to use.:D

As for cleaning, I've done some cleaning to these indicators, but it is very easy to mess one up too. Go easy on cleaners, don't use brake cleaners! electrical cleaners are probably the best to using an ultrasonic cleaner.
 

rgray

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#9
Is the little hole in the cap for anything special
I see nobody answering this.
I'm thinking air vent.....but just a guess.
I've had some luck with a silicon spray for sticky indicators. only use it if cleaning with alcohol didn't work.
 

mikey

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#10
Thank you. I would not reference somebody else’s recommendation, especially if you do not have you own. I have been repairing and making watch and clock parts most of my life. Indicators fall into that category. I will continue to clean and lightly oil the plunger, thank you. If you took that indicator apart and cleaned and oiled it. I would only oil the pivots and not the gear teeth. One must also consider the cost of that service to fix an indicator.
Actually, I used watch oil to lightly lube my old Teclock DI spindle that got sticky. That worked for about a month and then it got stickier so I put it aside and didn't use it. Then when I saw that recommendation from Rene at LIIS, I cleaned the spindle several times with denatured alcohol and its still working fine for the last several years. I'm afraid that's the only experience I have but in my case, Rene was right.
 

Bob Korves

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#11
X3 on Mark Ratkowski. A group of us here on H-M have 15 indicators and other tools sent to Mark at this time.
 

EmilioG

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#12
Oil tends to congeal and attract more grime so I would never use oil of any kind on my Interapids or any of my indicators for that matter.
Seems counter intuitive to me. Besides, Rene Meyer of LIIS has over 25 years repairing indicators, he comes from a family (Swiss) of these specialized technicians,
so I tend to heed his advice.
 
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darkzero

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#13
Keep in mind should you decide to lube indicators & such, best to use clock/instrument oil & very sparingly. These oils are formulated not gum up over time.

I've always wanted to get me some Starrett instrument oil but a while back on my last order of Kroil, I got a free 8oz can of Microil which is Kano's version of instrument oil. Been happy with the stuff & the can should last me a lifetime. I'm a big fan of Kroil so I have trust in their other products.
 

woodchucker

Active Member
Active Member
#14
I would try a drop of light machine oil on the plunger. That usually works for me…Dave
I Never oil. it gums it up.
you can take off the back and put it in clean mineral spirits. That will usually clean it up.
As far as calibration, that's a different story. If you just want it cleaned, you can do it yourself but the calibration needs to go out. Expect to pay from 45 to 100.

BTW that's the same Federal I have the b21, .0001, mine has a greenish tint to it. Your's looks crystal clear.

BTW it says jeweled, I thought jeweled meant no oil needed, as the jewel provides the points for things to run on...
 
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darkzero

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#15
BTW it says jeweled, I thought jeweled meant no oil needed, as the jewel provides the points for things to run on.
Yep, the jewels, like in timepieces are plain bearings usually made of synthetic ruby. They are used cause they don't require lubrication. Jeweled indicators really do have them too, if you take one apart you will see them.
 

Bob Korves

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#16
Even with jewels most indicators also have sliding surfaces, which can be run dry or with oil, and the question still stands -- oil or no oil? To me, oil tends to gum, lack of oil leads to wear and grit. Oil helps to stop corrosion, dry does not. If I had some high quality watch and clock oil, I think I would choose it.
 

chips&more

Active User
Active Member
#17
Jeez Louise, has this sparked some boisterous conversation. As far as jeweled timepieces go. Jeweled timepieces get oiled. The ONLY one that does not get oil is the Atoms clock, to my recollection. And maybe some unique application that could or could not be oiled. The gear train/teeth are not oiled. Just the pivots. And yes, the pivots with jewels get oil.

The selection of oil can be a forever topic. All I will say is the newer synthetics do not dry out or gum up as much.

Now, about oiling the plunger! Maybe another forever topic! I mentioned that somethings are not oiled. Oil attracts crap and that crap is bad for operation. But no oil speeds wear and maybe corrosion. I would rather have a thin film of good synthetic oil on a clean plunger, than no oil. This is a general statement, exceptions to specific indicators with hard chrome plungers etc. will of course be a different story. Good night and boy do I hate to type…Dave.
 
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kd4gij

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Active Member
#20
Well I have dial indictors mounted on 2 lathes and 2 horizontal mills that get covered in mist coolant and wd has worked for years. But I am dot recommending it by any means.
 

Bob Korves

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#21
I found out first hand on two indicators with sticky stems that WD40 would loosen them up immediately, but the next time I took one out to use it, it was sticky again. Then I cleaned them up with alcohol and went to a tiny amount of Velocite #3 spindle oil, ISO 2, normally used for plain bearing surface grinder spindles. It is working well so far, fairly short term.
 

dlane

Active User
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#23
Woodchucker , It dose have a green tint to the dial face,
Think I'll try a little isopropyl on plunger, what about under top cap area ?
don't want to take it apart
 

chips&more

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Active Member
#24
Yep, the jewels, like in timepieces are plain bearings usually made of synthetic ruby. They are used cause they don't require lubrication. Jeweled indicators really do have them too, if you take one apart you will see them.
Darkzero, don’t open up a watch repair shop just yet! You will have too many comebacks!...LOL. The jeweled holes in a timepiece get oiled. But, too much oil can be worse than no oil at all. Because oil attracts crap, and too much oil is too much crap. You get the idea, now you are a certified watch repair person, Good Luck at your new trade…Chips&More.
 

EmilioG

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#25
There are several authoritative books on Indicator repair. I've also read the repair guides from Starrett, and they note dirty hair springs as a possible culprit
in sticky indicators. I wouldn't do a self repair without full knowledge and even then, it's risky for my investments. I've read that the bearings and pinions are the only parts that get a tiny amount of oil, and it's fine Swiss Watch oil that is used. I'd like to read those books just for GP., but I'm not ready to take an indicator apart just yet. :)
 

bobl

Active Member
Active Member
#26
Not to disagree, Dave, but Long Island Indicator has this to say about a sticking dial indicator spindle: "The spindle should never require lubrication. In fact, when we repair them we make certain to clean them thoroughly so that no grease, oil or grime remain. It may be a better idea to apply a few drops of alcohol to the spindle. This may clean it, if dirt is the issue. ..."
I've used acetone on mine some times they do get grubby and dusty


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rgray

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#28
use a clean cloth with acetone and always wear gloves
That's my thought also.
Then I'll be sitting on the couch watching tv and the ol lady will start removing her finger nail polish, and I'm like holy **** do you know what that stuff is!!! and she says YES it's finger nail polish remover.... and to think I'm afraid of getting acetone on my hands.
 

Tozguy

Active User
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#29
I have no right to say anything about fixing indicators, but here goes anyway.
If any of my cheap indicators gets sticky and gives me a learning opportunity, naphtha (white gas) will be first on my list. It works great to clean delicate triggers and leaves the slightest film.

There is no doubt about the expert advice given above but I just gotta know for myself about the naphtha.
 

darkzero

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Staff member
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#30
Darkzero, don’t open up a watch repair shop just yet! You will have too many comebacks!...LOL. The jeweled holes in a timepiece get oiled. But, too much oil can be worse than no oil at all. Because oil attracts crap, and too much oil is too much crap. You get the idea, now you are a certified watch repair person, Good Luck at your new trade…Chips&More.
Yeah but isn't that how you generate more business for repairs? ;)

Watch & indicator repair is too delicate for me, I don't have the patience. All my watches go to NEWW for work, well mods mostly. I'll leave stuff like that to the pros.