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What Type Of Stone To Deburr Between Scraping Cycles.

Discussion in 'MACHINE RESTORATION & WAY SCRAPING' started by Playingwithmetal, Mar 7, 2016.

  1. Playingwithmetal

    Playingwithmetal United States Active Member Active Member

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    Hey. I left my burr buster table dressing stone at a buddies shop a few hours away. I also accidentally told home he could have it. I ordered a replacement burr buster but there on back order for a while. I attempted to try a few of the stones I have in my drawer I use for honing and all of them left scratches on the test metal I tries them on. What type of dressing stone do you all use? And where can I get one. Thanks in advance for your answers. This group has been a vital and integral part of my leading them machine experience.
    Thanks
    Dylan
     
  2. tertiaryjim

    tertiaryjim Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    When hogging I use a 80 grit stone.
    As the surface improves and I get out the pull scraper a soft arkansaws stone
     
  3. Playingwithmetal

    Playingwithmetal United States Active Member Active Member

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    Thanks. I have watched a few u tube videos showing pull scraping. It looked amazingly controlled. Of course I know better to think that it very well may have been amazing skill being applied and nothing easy about what I was watching. I have tried searching for pull scraper tip sharpening info. What type of radius,chamfers, angles ect... Couldn't even find any photos of finished pull blades. I would very much like to make one of a few if I could lean how. Also I tried a Arkansas stone and it put scratches in the test steel I tried. Maybe I should chamfer the stones edge? Or I could have been applying to much pressure.
    Thanks
    Dylan
     
  4. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    When I'm scraping, I keep a fine grit oil stone submerged in a old coffee can filled enough with mineral spirits to cover the stone. I stone the surface gently, not heavy, just enough to remove any burrs, then wipe off clean ready for reapplying of bluing. Everyone will establish their own way of doing this, there are wrong ways, so be careful what you do. The harder Indian stones will scratch where a softer Arkansa stone may not. I use an old grayish looking (Norton Cardium) knife sharpening stone, broken in half from an accidental fall. But flood it with mineral spirits and that will help a bunch to reduce scratching.
     
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  5. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    A Norton knife India stone works well for stoning various types of flat work including between scraping scraping passes. Ulma Doctor turned me on to the idea of using a fine white ceramic sharpening stone and generic Windex for deburring between passes. It works great, is inexpensive, and the stone does not load up. Any stone needs to be kept flat and a truly flat, coarse grit, diamond stone works well for lapping it. I have not tried the hardened steel edge idea of deburring scraping work and would be interested in hearing about it.
     
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  6. Playingwithmetal

    Playingwithmetal United States Active Member Active Member

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    Thanks for all your replies. The mineral spirits helped me a lot. I really appreciate you all taking the time to answer my questions.
    Thanks
    Dylan
     
    FOMOGO and 4gsr like this.
  7. tertiaryjim

    tertiaryjim Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    What a lot of people use is windex to wet the surface for stoning. Also when scraping as long as it doesn't interfere with the blue.
    This gives a cleaner scraping cut and the tool edge lasts longer.
     
  8. chevydyl

    chevydyl United States Active User Active Member

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    Norton fine India bench stone for starters, after its getting close I use a Norton white Arkansas, both with a light touch

    And plus 1 for windex
    Be sure and flatten your stone prior to use, lap it on some 220 sandpaper wet dry or open drywall paper, use lots of windex, the hard ark stone took about 10 min and a pack of drywall paper to flatten. Lap on a flat surface, not your granite plate unless you take precaution to shield it from the grit, I use windex on the bottom of my paper to make it stick to the flat surface
     
  9. The Liberal Arts Garage

    The Liberal Arts Garage United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Just a strategy from a cheap OF------get a bunch of sway- backed sharpening
    stones and a couple of new concrete rubbing stones. Go at it,flattening the one
    with another. Finish as earlier mentioned with a flat surface and sandpaper.
    BLJHB
     
    chevydyl likes this.
  10. chevydyl

    chevydyl United States Active User Active Member

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    Whatever is available that is a great idea, a diamond flattening plate is probably the best, but I don't wanna shell out the cash for anything more than the bare minimums
     
  11. Andre

    Andre Active User Active Member

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    My preference is a soft Arkansas.

    Diamond stones I would NOT recommend, just too aggressive. Same goes with aluminum oxide stones (HF, India) but with a light touch those can be used. Make sure your stones are flat, as well!
     
  12. wgpeters

    wgpeters United States Swarf Registered Member

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    I used to work in the quartz crystal (radio crystals) industry, and we had huge lapping plates which contra-rotated with the crystals in between. These plates were about 4 feet in diameter, 3 inches thick, and had to be absolutely thick. The plates had to be lapped flat. The fellow who took care of the laps told me that three plates had to be lapped to insure flatness. IE: just lapping two plates together could leave one plate concave and the other convex. By lapping each plate against the other two, one at a time was the only way to insure that all three were flat.
    I mention this because flattening one part on another does not guarantee flatness. Maybe its close enough though.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2016
  13. Kernbigo

    Kernbigo United States Active User Active Member

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    i use a broken wheel from a norton thread grinding wheel 180 grit
     

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