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Well I've gathered stuff to practice scraping.

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Bob Korves

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#31
A perfectly good hand scraper can be made without any welding equipment and without any machinery at all, just hand tools. Your surface plate looks good from here, though it is hard to check it for millionths flatness by looking at the pics...
 

Dabbler

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#36
if you decide to 'scrap' :);) those Logan parts I can use them for other projects!:eek:
 

expressline99

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#38
Yes, a green wheel will grind carbide, but it will need to be honed to finish it sharp and true. I know a fellow near here who has a small planer, from the 1800's, that is hand operated. It is tiny... He also has at least 5 more planers, up to BIG, a couple are from the 1860's, in beautiful original condition, and a lot of other really cool stuff!
I gotta wonder if that's my future self... Am I living in the woods with a big shop then?

Also, is it a bad sign when I caught myself trying to see if my mouse is hinging at about 30%?

Paul
 

Bob Korves

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#40
If you think that's the way to go I'll try to get it. I see now there isn't a buy it now button. :(
It's your money... I would try to get a bit of exposure to the sport first. Let's work up a scraping day, come and visit, and try out a few different scrapers on some victims... Nobody wants to buy a car without taking it, or one like it, for a test drive. Length and width matter, so does flexibility. Some people use different techniques that require different handles. Sure, you can make most anything work, but something that feels comfortable, helps with accuracy, and makes you happy will go a long way toward making scraping enjoyable.
 

expressline99

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#41
It's your money... I would try to get a bit of exposure to the sport first. Let's work up a scraping day, come and visit, and try out a few different scrapers on some victims... Nobody wants to buy a car without taking it, or one like it, for a test drive. Length and width matter, so does flexibility. Some people use different techniques that require different handles. Sure, you can make most anything work, but something that feels comfortable, helps with accuracy, and makes you happy will go a long way toward making scraping enjoyable.
Great idea. I'll put the brakes on until I can get some time in with different tools. It seems to me at least in my mind that I want one that has some spring to it.

Paul
 

expressline99

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#42
I was using my Logan again today and there is a hinging motion going on with the compound where it's worn. When in that position I can actually twist it with my hand a little. It of course has new gibs. The compound must be scraped back into check. It currently leaves me with half of it being tight enough to use and the rest too sloppy to do anything with. How hard would it be to get that back in shape? If I got that part done first I'd be thrilled. Seems like I can start there and work my way down using that as reference for the rest. The machine restoration book mentions taking it from there down. But I haven't gotten far enough to know if that's the best way.

Paul
 

Bob Korves

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#43
I was using my Logan again today and there is a hinging motion going on with the compound where it's worn. When in that position I can actually twist it with my hand a little. It of course has new gibs. The compound must be scraped back into check. It currently leaves me with half of it being tight enough to use and the rest too sloppy to do anything with. How hard would it be to get that back in shape? If I got that part done first I'd be thrilled. Seems like I can start there and work my way down using that as reference for the rest. The machine restoration book mentions taking it from there down. But I haven't gotten far enough to know if that's the best way.

Paul
Paul, the first job in the sequence of operations of reconditioning a lathe (after leveling the bed) is scraping in the compound rest. Great place to start, though the basic scraping skills must come first. That is a straightforward job without a lot of surface area that needs to be worked on.

(Most people would probably want to attack the bed ways first when reconditioning a lathe, but they would only be making a LOT more work for themselves... READ AND UNDERSTAND THE BOOK FIRST!)
 

expressline99

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#44
Paul, the first job in the sequence of operations of reconditioning a lathe (after leveling the bed) is scraping in the compound rest. Great place to start, though the basic scraping skills must come first. That is a straightforward job without a lot of surface area that needs to be worked on.

(Most people would probably want to attack the bed ways first when reconditioning a lathe, but they would only be making a LOT more work for themselves... READ AND UNDERSTAND THE BOOK FIRST!)
Good well at least the way I'm reading it makes sense then.
 
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