• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
  • PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

Success on a whitetail doe.

HRgx

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2017
Messages
41
Likes
68
#1
Where I live, we hunt. This morning, I took a drive without any intention to hunt. But as I always have several firearms in my truck (a triple deuce for coyotes, a shotgun for upland birds, a .243 for deer size game and my trusty .444 Marlin in case a grizz wants to eat me) I came upon some road hunters. I'm sure we all have them, you guys south of the border likely do as well. Anyhow, these bozzos were driving a fence line on one of my many honey holes. So I decided to park my butt on the fence line. Sure enough, bozzos pushed 8 does to my stand. The .243W did the job. Sierra 85 gr. GameKings, maybe 150 yards if that. She stepped out about 30 yards before expiring. The missus and I will be having tenderloins for supper tomorrow.

WTdoe2017.jpg
 

Silverbullet

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
2,348
Likes
1,058
#2
Hey when I grew up here in the commie state , we hunted and fished went crabbing . Picked wild grapes , black berries and raspberries even strawberries when we beat the birds , chipmonks and others. I loved pan fried crappies and perch.
Shoot we even had days off of school for deer season. I can still see all my male relatives down on my uncle's farm and woods.
God I hate what's happening to our nation. But I'm a loin lover and the livers my fave to on deer harvest. Yum I could go now for some.
Hunted my entire life till I couldn't do the walking and standing. Miss it really badly. Good luck now get a nice buck ,we can kill two does it's almost mandatory now.
 

dlane

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2014
Messages
2,209
Likes
877
#5
Where I live now there everywhere, not aloud to hunt them some folks hand feed them out the window.
Bad for the freezer, good for the body shops
 

benmychree

John York
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2013
Messages
996
Likes
561
#6
I have not hunted fo
Hey when I grew up here in the commie state , we hunted and fished went crabbing . Picked wild grapes , black berries and raspberries even strawberries when we beat the birds , chipmunks and others. I loved pan fried crappies and perch.
Shoot we even had days off of school for deer season. I can still see all my male relatives down on my uncle's farm and woods.
God I hate what's happening to our nation. But I'm a loin lover and the livers my fave to on deer harvest. Yum I could go now for some.
Hunted my entire life till I couldn't do the walking and standing. Miss it really badly. Good luck now get a nice buck ,we can kill two does it's almost mandatory now.
I have not hunted since the early 1970s, but sure do love venison, the gamier the better; we used to have a deer club with about 2,000 acres to hunt on, but since vineyards have taken the place of grazing lane and depredation permits have been issued freely, the deer are scares and it seems most of the meat, I think goes to tacos; such is California. cars seem to take a large toll of does around here. If only coyotes were good to eat, we'd be really well off here!
 

Richard White (richardsrelics)

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2015
Messages
151
Likes
106
#9
We in Indiana, are just being allowed to use High Powered Rifles....within the last year or two... I promptly retired my trusty 60+ year old Ithica Model 37 Featherlite 20 ga, and bought a 30-06 I have dropped some big boys in my day. I am comfortable at 200 yards with the Ithica knowing all conditions must be right.....With the 30-06, at 200 yards, I have no worries.... Yes I know it can shoot further, but I refuse to do so for personal reasons.

Bullet drop compared to my 20 ga is a frigging joke, basically non existent, and knock down power is 5 times greater....or more...going to be a fun year....and HRgx awesome buck there, even if it is not yours...
 

RJSakowski

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2015
Messages
2,764
Likes
2,831
#10
Wisconsin has a rich history of deer hunting. Every November, upwards of 600,000 hunters take to the woods. I used to hunt deer with a passion, having taken more than 100 deer over my lifetime with most of them in the period from 1978 to 2008 and on the 300 acres that was the farm that my property usw part of.. I hunted with both bow and rifle.

I gave up hunting twelve years ago, mostly because of the CWD problem. I lived three miles from ground zero when the problem first surfaced. Currently, it is estimated by the DNR that 1`5% of the deer population is infected and 45% of the adult bucks are infected.

I used to live on venison but with the increasing prevalence of CWD in the herd, I gave up hunting deer and eating venison. CWD is a close relative of Mad Cow Disease and while the has not yet been a case of the disease jumping to humans, IMO, it's just not worth the risk.

A change occured in the rules and regulations which also affected my desire to hunt. For most of my huinting life, we had a traditional 9 day gun hunting season whuich began on the Saturday preceding Thanksgiving and ended the Sunday following. On the day before season opened, there was a mass exodus to the woods. Season opened at daybreak and was was generally amassive kill that first day with things slowing dow3n on Sunday. Thanksgiving morning was usually an active time as well. Bow hunting began in late September and continued until the end of the year with a break for the gun season. In latter years, a black powder season was added after the traditional gun season, then a T zone hunt in October in the Eradication zone in our area. The result of all of this was that the hunter presence was scattered throughout the year and there wasn't nearly as many hunters in the woods at any given time.

Additional rule changes permited hunting from tree stands, hunting over bait, and the use of cross bows for bow hunting. The sport changed from one of hunting to shooting. Deer generally do not move very much during the day. They will bed down and stay unless something, like a hunter walkng through. spooks them. Hunters would walk out to their stands before daybreak and sit there, in some cases until the end of the day and then complain about not seeing any deer. The war-like sounds of bygone years have past. Nowadays, it is not uncommon to not hear a single shot in the course of a day.

I used to freeze my butt off on a stand. I came to the realization that if I moved slowly and quietly through the woods I didn't get cold and I didn'r get bored. I strategy was to move slower than the deer. If I did so, I would have a god chance at getting off a shot before the deer saw me. I digured that I had about one chance in ten of seeing the deer before they saw me but I saw ten times as many deer so it was a wash. And I didn't have cold feet. I also preferred still hunting when bow hunting. There is a huger adrenaline rush when you are on the ground and a ten point buck walks to within ten feet of you.

I miss the hunting experience but I have no regrets. I used to tremember were every kill occured and what the details were. There were far too many ro do so in the later years and my memi4ry isn't as sharp as it once was. I still have my rifles and bows. Perhaps because selling them would be an admission that it was over. Who knos, my rwelve acres has been transformed from a pasture yo a forest and I ,ay go out again.
 

RJSakowski

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2015
Messages
2,764
Likes
2,831
#11
For all you deer hunters, Here is a scene from Iowa. Fourteen deer, one day.
1509914186699.jpg
 

woodchucker

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2015
Messages
1,021
Likes
645
#12
For all you deer hunters, Here is a scene from Iowa. Fourteen deer, one day.
View attachment 245990
How can you gut and clean all those deer b4 the meat goes bad?? Seems excessive for one hunt. Nothing against hunting, but something about not being able to clean them all.

Last night a huge buck took out 2 vehicles by me. The thing was enormous.
 

RJSakowski

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2015
Messages
2,764
Likes
2,831
#13
If those deer weren't already gutted, I wuldn't want to eat the meat. The photo weas sent to me by someone else but I would guess that it is the combined effort of a fairly large group of hunters. If Iowa is like Wisconsin, junters are only allowed one buck per season. On many farms, the kids leave the farm for the city but come back for the traditional deer hunt. Over the years, grandchildren and possibly even great grandchildren hoin the hunt. It becomes a family affair of including the traditional Thanksgiving dinner at Gramma's.

Many times the processing takes place on site with everyone pitching in. A single person can skin, butcher, cut, and wrap a deer n a few hours. Or you can haul the lot to a local meat processing plant where they are refrigerated and processed.
 

eeler1

Dang, buggered that up too!!
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2014
Messages
352
Likes
158
#15
Well, there’s a few bucks left in NorCal. Less these two. Last weekend of season.

In California, we are gradually converting to non-lead ammo, which most folks say is not nearly as effective or accurate. I just bought some to try out for next year, so don’t know yet. The ban is due to various endangered species that ingest lead left behind in guts and what not, and then die from lead poisoning. I’m okay with the idea, not interested in extincting any more of gods creations just so I can shoot whatever load I feel like. Just wish someone would come up with unleaded that shoots good.
 

Attachments

RJSakowski

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2015
Messages
2,764
Likes
2,831
#16
In California, we are gradually converting to non-lead ammo, which most folks say is not nearly as effective or accurate. I just bought some to try out for next year, so don’t know yet. The ban is due to various endangered species that ingest lead left behind in guts and what not, and then die from lead poisoning.
Interesting. The primary consumers of gut piles or lost downed animals are coyotes. Coyotes are considered a pest here with no closed season or bag limit. Timber wolves have been reintroduced to northern Wisconsin and would also be possible consumers but their numbers have increased to the point where there is now a hunting season. Black bears would be another consumer but again, an annual hunting season.

A gut shot animal is unlikely to have any remnants of lead in the carcass when high power ammunition is used. Almost all wounded animals are recovered by hunters. Bottom line, the probability of finding lead in a carcass is very small and the probability of a preidtor dying from ingested lead even smaller.

I have shot over 100 deer in my lifetme and could count on two hands the number of times that I have found lead in the carcass. In lmost all cases, ii's a pass-through.
 

HRgx

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2017
Messages
41
Likes
68
#18
Here in NJ hunting is done with a shotgun. There's no pass through. They want to prevent that. Aren't politicians great :mad:
Not uncommon for politicians to write laws about something they know nothing of. We experience likewise here north of the 49th.
 

eeler1

Dang, buggered that up too!!
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2014
Messages
352
Likes
158
#19
Deer aren't really the issue, agree on the pass-thru and probably minimal influence of deer hunting lead on the environment.

But, we shoot lots of coyotes, ground squirrels, and other little pest critters that are then eaten by others. The food chain is pretty unforgiving. For instance, we are finding that hawks and fishers and the like are dying off from the rat poison that the pot growers use to kill the wood rats that like to chew on the plant stems. The rats get sick and are easy pickings for those critters that eat them, then they get sick and die too.

The lead ban here started because of the California Condor. Why God made the critter so incredibly stupid, we can't know, but one of the few remaining birds died after drinking radiator fluid that had leaked out onto the ground. Why would any creature do that? The ban started in condor territory, after high lead levels were found in the hatchlings, who were dying after hatching or had thin shelled eggs or that kind of thing.
 
Container Above bottom breadcrumb