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Polishing metal on a lathe

Discussion in 'A BEGINNER'S FORUM (Learn How To Machine Here!)' started by The_Apprentice, Jul 16, 2017.

  1. The_Apprentice

    The_Apprentice Canada Active Member Active Member

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    Well I don't know... I have always been told (and read) to NEVER let your hands/fingers come in contact with material on a lathe in operation. But I'm seeing this all over youtube, particularly with those who use mini-lathes for making jewelry, or other small items.

    I just don't know. Am I a little too cautious at times? For example, this procedure I just saw was making me just cringe--



    Thanks in advance. I'm still going to assume it's quite possible to lose fingers on a Mini, even with ones that have plastic gears & belts if the chuck is rotating fast enough...
     
  2. T Bredehoft

    T Bredehoft Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I polish Aluminum on my lathe, finish with Simichrome polish. I apply it and polish it with a cloth, not my fingers, haven't lost a cloth yet. Yes, I am careful.
     
  3. Ed ke6bnl

    Ed ke6bnl Active Member Active Member

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    2 centers with no dog??
     
  4. Silverbullet

    Silverbullet Active Member Active Member

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    There are those on YouTube who professes to be machinist . The real ones you can tell , they try to never get there hands or fingers near revolving work . There are some ways to polish without getting close to the point of getting hurt. Watch doubleboost , he gets close but tries not too. He gets cut often but always tries to show the right way. As long as you don't have jewelry or loose clothing and long hair it's very hard to get caught , you must be mindful of what your doing , don't blame anybody else if you go beyond the comfort range you must set.
    I see these guys feel the finish on a mill with the endmill still running NOT GOOD , One guy scares the crap out of me at times Keith Fenner , his tied up goat tee is a disaster just waiting to happen. Others no SAFTEY glasses , long sleeves loosely hanging , life's to long to be crippled for the length of it. I've mentioned politely to many of the SAFTEY issues. Some are congenial others ignore. But it's ok my shop teachers taught us to practise SAFTEY for everyone.
     
    Tozguy likes this.
  5. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Plenty of people put stock into and finished work out of collets on the lathe with the machine running at speed. You have to touch it more than gingerly to do that. Others test the surface finish with their bare fingers, and seem to know what they are doing. I certainly would not try those operations with my skill level, but people with lots of experience certainly do so, and hopefully understand the risks. The most dangerous things are the ones you do not know are waiting to bite you. Especially in a hobby shop, there is no good reason for not being as careful as possible, which also includes learning, studying, and filing information away in our brains to keep us from getting hurt. Being safe is by no means being a sissy...

    I used to have the chuck key to my drill press attached to a strong chain attached to the head. One day it occurred to me what would happen if I ever started the spindle with the chuck key in the chuck. I immediately removed the chain and found a new place for the chuck key, with no tether. I was ignorant, not my fault, but it could still have hurt me badly. I will give myself credit for thinking about the possible danger and immediately mitigating it. There are always more gotchas out there waiting to bite you.

    Y'all be careful out there...
     
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  6. Rockytime

    Rockytime United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    There is a guy on u tube that works on the lathe and mill with gloves. Not latex but real gloves. Seem to finish his project with fingers intact. Amazing.
     
  7. chips&more

    chips&more United States Active User Active Member

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    Just because it’s on YouTube, does not mean it’s good or correct. Just because it’s on the internet does not mean it’s good or correct.
     
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  8. Buffalo20

    Buffalo20 United States Active Member Active Member

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    You mean everything I see on the net, isn't 100% the truth, first it was no dragons, then no unicorns, now its questionable information on the net, my faith in the world has been completely shattered.............<sigh>
     
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  9. Cadillac STS

    Cadillac STS United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I just use a buffing wheel with compound to do that.

    The youtube guy was taking a chance on severe injury.

    It would be possible to make a simple wooden jig with a handle to hold the green and white abrasive pads in a sling and hold that with your hand away for safety. Put same pressure on the fabric in a sling. With a soft cloth instead of paper for the final buffing.
     
  10. The_Apprentice

    The_Apprentice Canada Active Member Active Member

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    I had been thinking about something like that myself.
     
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  11. benmychree

    benmychree United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I have been wrapping abrasive cloth around things in the lathe for polishing since I was in high school back in '62 and in apprenticeship and as a machinist since then; occasionally, the abrasive strip might catch and pull the fingers in and give them a painful event, but never anything serious, no breakage of anything but the abrasive strip; it seems that the new abrasive strip is weaker in the fabric than years ago, now it seems to break way easier, making it less likely to damage the fingers if things catch and wind up the strip and fingers with it; newer strip breaks before it even catches.
     
  12. dlane

    dlane Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    They used this lathe for polishing SS by hand , they polished the chuck also , amazingly the bed ways are good,
    DSCN4382.JPG
     
  13. benmychree

    benmychree United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Another thing about wrapping the abrasive cloth around the part when polishing in the lathe is that it seems that even in USA made abrasive cloth, the strength of the fabric seems to be considerably weaker than the "good old days", Back then if the cloth hung up on the part, and tried to wreck your fingers, it did not break; nowadays, I see the band break just under th force of the spinning part, much weaker than back then; the effect is to make it harder to injure one's self by wrapping up your fingers in the abrasive cloth around the part being polished.
     
  14. benmychree

    benmychree United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    That is pretty hard to imagine ----- !
     
  15. firestopper

    firestopper H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I prefer to use 5C scroll chuck when using emery cloth or polishing, never folding back on itself, using two hands. Jawed chucks have a way of winning when contacted.
     
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  16. kd4gij

    kd4gij United States Active User Active Member

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    I polish on the lathe all the time. But never wrap around the part. I hold the emery or scotch barite between the thumb and for finger. That way when it grabs, it just pulls it out of my hand. No harm no foul.
     
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  17. pdentrem

    pdentrem Active User Active Member

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    Never wrap your hand around the spinning part. Simply hold the two ends and pull towards you as mentioned by kd4gij. I polish rolling mill work rolls with a old set of crucible tongs. I have a leather strap that is held by the tongs and use a narrow piece of Emery cloth or paper. The leather forms around about half of the part and supplies the pressure that my hand causes by closing the tongs. Work great and I can stall the lathe with too much pressure, only 1 1/2 hp motor. There is a picture somewhere on this site showing the tongs.
    Pierre
     
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  18. The_Apprentice

    The_Apprentice Canada Active Member Active Member

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    LOL!

    Thanks for the replies guys. I'm still overly cautious, after seeing too many incidences, and hearing of much worse from others in my father's machineshop.

    At least it's better than learning the HARD WAYS (pun intended).
     
  19. kd4gij

    kd4gij United States Active User Active Member

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    Best not doing something your not comfortable by all means.
     
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  20. BROCKWOOD

    BROCKWOOD United States Active Member Active Member

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    Lotsa good reading here! I saw a You Tuber with loose sleeves & a wrist watch the other day.
    I cringed. Fenner's chin hair or even my long hair are much less a danger if we're cognizant
    of how aware we must be in each decision & position assumed during a given operation. I'll
    use a file to work a piece in a running lathe - but I realize which way to position it should the
    unthinkable launch happen. The trajectory would be away from me & out of my hands. I use
    strips of sandpaper. My hands are near a foot away from the moving part. Again, if it grabs,
    my fingers cannot be pulled into moving parts.
    After the high school girl with long hair somehow got tangled up in a lathe (during horse play),
    I discovered that OSHA requires a cover on the lead screw in shops with more than 1 worker.
    I decided to add this cover, not because of the girl's accident or even because I have long hair.
    I added it to keep the screw clean.
    There is a point of No Return during every operation. I got confused on which way to start my
    cross slide when at full stop & wrecked it. That was a point of No Return. Parts only took six
    months to arrive. Take your time. Identify "traps". Check your direction. Do dry runs to prove
    your direction is correct. Slow down. Measure twice - with different instruments to prove the
    answer is correct & repeatable. Enjoy the outcome!

    Pic below is added lead screw cover, rebuilt apron & ready to assemble the cross slide with new
    parts.

    20160725 031.jpg
     

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