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Parting Out My 12" Utilathe

Discussion in 'MONARCH MACHINE TOOL CO.' started by Glenn Brooks, Dec 8, 2015.

  1. Glenn Brooks

    Glenn Brooks H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Iam thinking of parting out my 1950 Standard-Modern 12" x48" Utilathe. It's a grand machine, true example of Big Iron capability, but the ways are worn badly and I have about decided I don't want to spend the $4k necessary to grind and scape them flat, plus build up the worn tailstock and saddle.

    Actually, The machine is a prime candidate for a rebuild, but I don't think I want to take that on - already got to much to do in the Que... so it's either pass it on to someone at a decent price, or part it out, and apply the proceeds to tooling for the replacement.

    Anybody need parts, let me know. I plan on making g a decision over the next few weeks and probably can ship stuff early January - if it turns out this is the way to go.

    Glenn

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    Last edited: Dec 8, 2015
  2. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    That looks like a nice lathe, Glenn. How about trying to sell it complete to someone who is willing to do the work to make it right? That would also be less hassle than parting it out.
     
  3. Andre

    Andre Active User Active Member

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    Can the bed be intentionally twisted to compensate for way wear? My SB 13" has very badly worn, and grooved carriage ways. At least .030, but it can turn to tenths on a 9" length because the bed is twisted slightly counter clockwise.
     
  4. Glenn Brooks

    Glenn Brooks H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Hi Bob, yes, selling outright would be ideal. Just need to find the right fit with a buyer interested in a restoration - this would be a fantastic machine if someone were willing to go through the proces.

    Andre, yep, I probably can induce some twist- just spent two months taking some twist out - both with leveling screws and shims between the bed casting and the table/chip tray. That might mediate the bed wear a bit. question is how much movement to induce?

    Glenn
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2015
  5. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Just enough to make it turn a true cylinder near the chuck, maybe 8-10" or so. You can then offset the tailstock as needed to turn longer work.
     
  6. Glenn Brooks

    Glenn Brooks H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks Bob, I just got a spur gear in the mail from Canada, to replace an original worn out gear in the apron. I had a chance to buy an almost new 14 x 40 lathe at auction this week, but the price went from $800 to $3500 in two hours, so Iam thinking I will try to tweak my Big Iron as you suggested, and see what happens. My back up plan is to mill down the hogged out mating surface on my tail stock and build it back up to proper height with turcite, at some point. At least if the centers are aligned, I can work around the remaining saddle issues... Time will tell.


    Glenn
     

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