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Machine restorers

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Hukshawn

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#1
The guys on this site that restore machines, where do you guys go to get the name plates and tables reprinted on metal plates? A few of you seen several times pictures of the gear tables on my lathe and they're really quite faded. I really love to have them reprinted but I don't have any idea where to go
 

eeler1

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#2
You can restore yourself if there is enough meat left on the lettering. Keith Rucker did a video on restoring his for the LeBlond or Monarch he was working on. Otherwise, you have to get together with others that have that same machine, and hope someone has figured it out. Seems like somebody did some SB or Logan replica plates a while back.
 

Hukshawn

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#3
I'll win the lottery before I find original or remade parts for this lathe.
 

Hukshawn

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#5
Keith was restoring a stamped plate, mine is printed. I cannot use his same method. But thanks for the reference.
 

dlane

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#6
What u got, there could be repops out there
 

Hukshawn

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#7
There won't be spare plates out there. I literally cannot even find another one of these lathes never mind parts.
There is a company H.R Roberts machinery that has the blueprints to make parts but they are astronomically expensive. But I have emailed them already. I've also contacted a local trophy shop that had printed on brass plates for me when I made my brother in-laws urns a few years ago.
We'll see what I come up with. I was just putting feelers out there what some of the guys here have done.
 

Cadillac STS

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#9
I would call a local silk screening place. They would have access to someone to draw the art from your current plate (To make the screens) in each color you want and could silk screen it on a metal plate for you. In High School 30 years ago we had a setup for that, very easy to do.

If just one color I saw a process somewhere where you print on a special paper on a laser printer then iron on the lettering from there to the metal plate so you could do it yourself if you could draw up the images and had access to a laser printer. Someone was doing that for making pc boards on copper clad boards. Then cover with clear lacquer to protect it.

The good thing about the rare lathe is you can make the plate like you want it so long as it looks good no one would notice because no other machine to compare to. No pressure on getting exact match, just a good clean plate.
 

RandyM

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#10
I use a local graphics or sign company. They have a lot of tools to make new. One company is an engraver and I will have some stamped plates engraved. I have found that they are very reasonable for their rates. I have a challenge coming up, a Logan stamped name plate. It will be interesting as to what I find out on this one and the compromises I may have to make.
 

rowbare

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#11
John Saunders posted a video showing one technique to make a filled brass plate:


If making steel plates, you can use printed circuit board techniques. Reverse laser print on a transparent material and iron it onto the plate. Put some resist coating on the back side and dip in some ferric chloride solution till you get to the desired depth of etch. You can get ferric chloride from most electronic component stores.

For a printed plate, I have thought of printing on a t-shirt transfer sheet and applying that to the plate. I have yet to try it so I can't confirm whether this will work or not. You would need to apply a clear protective coat afterwards.

You can also get laser and inkjet printable decal sheets. Same as above, have the material but haven't tested it.

Of course all of these depend on having a cleaned up graphic of the original plate.

bob
 

Charles Spencer

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#12
I've used decal printer paper for machine logos. It seems that you could use it for metal data plates as well.
 

Hukshawn

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#13
All of these printer methods are okay with the oils and solvents? We have a laser printer... I wouldn't know what paper to use tho...

All of the companies I called cannot do what I'm asking.
 

kvt

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#14
I am also interested in the laser printer paper one, As I have an Asian lathe that needs tome new labels Single color will work. But right now I have nothing.
 

MozamPete

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#17
I have used the laser printer decal paper for some labels. I brought the clear background (you can also get a white background decal paper) to allow the machine colour to be the background.
The results were varying. The laser printed colour is not so vivid so can appear a bit washed out and hard to see on a dark background, but works quite well on a light background.
 

Mr Mike

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#18
I'm in the middle of restoring a Logan Lathe 1875 - So this is of interest to me as well...
I love Keith Ruckers Videos and will check it out, Im calling Logan to see If I can nab one from them.. Fingers crossed.

My Plate is in great shape, I just have to learn how to reprint it.. the video above shows a very except-able a way to do it but I dont have a CNC Mill, Laser table or powder equipment to do it.
 

whitmore

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#19
The guys on this site that restore machines, where do you guys go to get the name plates and tables reprinted on metal plates? ...
If I cared enough, I'd do it with electrochemical machining. There are iron-on mask materials, look on ebay
for 'photoresist dry film'. Start by making a 'negative' with your laser printer onto clear film.
The copper etch solutions are (of course) messy; I'd consider a mild acid
bath and reverse-electroplating techniques (I used to make shim washers this way, with fine details).
Nitric acid (beware fumes, it creates rust) cuts into stainless just dandy.

Probably the original plates were pressed against a die plate (made by etching?), then painted and polished.

There's shops that do etching very well (their business cards are stainless steel or brass samplers).

There are also vinyl sign cutters that half-cut a sheet at a time; adhere the sheet to
your metal, carefully lift off the 'waste', and it's ready for media blasting!
 

Hukshawn

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#20
I'm interested in the electroplating. I've watched AvE do it a few times with poor results... so I don't know. I have a bunch various plate stock I can use in various metals, aluminum, copper, brass. Just have to pick a method.

I did buy some plain sticker paper with the intentions of just making a sticker and lacquering it, but I could only get white background. Not very desirable.
 

Hukshawn

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#21
Also, I need to scan and restore the image, which will be time consuming... and my time is currently devoted to rebuilding the mill.
 

NortonDommi

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#22
Have you got any Laser engravers locally? These guys can scan a photograph and burn off paint to expose the underlying metal or they can Laser ecth, anyway it's all magic but comes out looking great.
 

T Bredehoft

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#23
If you go with a printed transfer, cover it with a transparent enamel and bake in in your wife's oven at 95ยบ C for an hour or so. That should make it impervious to oil and water, I don't know about solvents.
 

woodchucker

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#26
Keith was restoring a stamped plate, mine is printed. I cannot use his same method. But thanks for the reference.
You can use a scanner to scan your plate, then use the chemicals they use for etching circuit boards. I saw it used in Wood working to make custom brass tags for Wood projects. It did not look hard, and if you have a printer seems like a good way to go to get a resilient plate.
 
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