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Help With Power Supply

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speedre9

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#1
I got this power supply originaly for LED's and it has the following
360W, Input 100-240V 50/60Hz
Output; 5V, 12V, 24V, 36V, 48V. This is where I lose it. There are nine screw lugs,
three are for L,N,G., I get that, The remaining lugs are +V,+V,+V, com, com, com.
So how does the power suplly deliver those different output values. Can I connect
to any of the three or is there a difference? I'd like to use for my 3D Printer.
 

RJSakowski

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#2
I( would guess that the three output are isolated so that you can connect them in series to get the various voltages. A 5 volt output would be one. Another would be the 12 volt and the third would be the 36 volt. If you connect the 12 and 36 volt in series - to +, you would get 48 volts. If you connected them - to - or + to +, you would get 24 volts. It isw kind of a kludgey way to get there but it would work.

Use a voltmeter to identify the three outputs and check the different combinations.
 

tq60

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#3
Best to test it.

Connect L1 and L2 to line power then check the voltage outputs.

Check every combination as some may okay not be isolated

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
 

strantor

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#4
can you give the model number and/or pictures? Without that all you get are guesses.
My guess is that the 3 sets of +V and -V are common (tied together) and the power supply output voltage is selectable.

Several DC power supplies I have seen have duplicate terminals.
For example this guy:


The + and the other + are tied together, same for the minuses. This is for when you have several loads that all need to connect to the same supply; more terminals to land the wires.
 

RJSakowski

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#5
can you give the model number and/or pictures? Without that all you get are guesses.
My guess is that the 3 sets of +V and -V are common (tied together) and the power supply output voltage is selectable.

Several DC power supplies I have seen have duplicate terminals.
The + and the other + are tied together, same for the minuses. This is for when you have several loads that all need to connect to the same supply; more terminals to land the wires.
This makes sense. I have seen power supplies like that. I have also seen packaging that lists a variety of available voltages. Usually voltage pertaining to the power supply in the packaging is checked. The voltmeter will tell.
 

strantor

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#7
This makes sense. I have seen power supplies like that. I have also seen packaging that lists a variety of available voltages. Usually voltage pertaining to the power supply in the packaging is checked. The voltmeter will tell.
Yeah maybe a sticker with several voltage check boxes is on the P/S and one of them is/should be checked
 
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