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Help With Power Supply

Discussion in 'ELECTRICAL ISSUES - POWER YOUR MACHINES & SHOP' started by speedre9, Jul 11, 2017.

  1. speedre9

    speedre9 United States Active User Active Member

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    I got this power supply originaly for LED's and it has the following
    360W, Input 100-240V 50/60Hz
    Output; 5V, 12V, 24V, 36V, 48V. This is where I lose it. There are nine screw lugs,
    three are for L,N,G., I get that, The remaining lugs are +V,+V,+V, com, com, com.
    So how does the power suplly deliver those different output values. Can I connect
    to any of the three or is there a difference? I'd like to use for my 3D Printer.
     
  2. RJSakowski

    RJSakowski H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I( would guess that the three output are isolated so that you can connect them in series to get the various voltages. A 5 volt output would be one. Another would be the 12 volt and the third would be the 36 volt. If you connect the 12 and 36 volt in series - to +, you would get 48 volts. If you connected them - to - or + to +, you would get 24 volts. It isw kind of a kludgey way to get there but it would work.

    Use a voltmeter to identify the three outputs and check the different combinations.
     
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  3. tq60

    tq60 United States Active Member Active Member

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    Best to test it.

    Connect L1 and L2 to line power then check the voltage outputs.

    Check every combination as some may okay not be isolated

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
     
  4. strantor

    strantor United States Active User Active Member

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    can you give the model number and/or pictures? Without that all you get are guesses.
    My guess is that the 3 sets of +V and -V are common (tied together) and the power supply output voltage is selectable.

    Several DC power supplies I have seen have duplicate terminals.
    For example this guy:

    [​IMG]
    The + and the other + are tied together, same for the minuses. This is for when you have several loads that all need to connect to the same supply; more terminals to land the wires.
     
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  5. RJSakowski

    RJSakowski H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    This makes sense. I have seen power supplies like that. I have also seen packaging that lists a variety of available voltages. Usually voltage pertaining to the power supply in the packaging is checked. The voltmeter will tell.
     
  6. chips&more

    chips&more United States Active User Active Member

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    Do you have a volt meter?
     
  7. strantor

    strantor United States Active User Active Member

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    Yeah maybe a sticker with several voltage check boxes is on the P/S and one of them is/should be checked
     

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