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Glock 81 to kitchen knife?

Discussion in 'KNIFEMAKING' started by awaqa909, Mar 18, 2017.

  1. awaqa909

    awaqa909 United States Steel Registered Member

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    City:
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    Been wanting to do something like this for a good while. Had knifes I didn't like, then ended up getting some really terrible knifes, that are about as good as a butter knife.

    My questions are for doing this, how can I take the black coating off the blade? Will it rust? (The cheap set we have now has more rust spots then our last set that we had for several years)

    I'm looking for a single knife to experiment with, that's thick and looks cool, and this knife fits that.

    Good:
    Long
    Thick
    Strong
    Cool looking

    To do:
    Remove black coating
    Sharpen
    Use for cooking.

    How do I do:
    Remove black coating

    Thanks,
    Awaqa909
     
  2. ghostdncr

    ghostdncr United States Active Member Active Member

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    I've done a bit of looking around and have been unable to determine exactly what makes the 81's blade black. The blade is made from 1095 steel and I found suggestions that it was a simple phosphate coating: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphate_conversion_coating If this is indeed the case, you can probably remove the surface finish by soaking in common white vinegar for several hours, following up with a wire brush and repeated vinegar soaks until the surface is clean. Once stripped of its finish though, I suspect 1095 will rust up rather quickly in the kitchen environment.

    If that blade has undergone the Tennifer treatment like Glock slides, I would abandon this project immediately...lol
     
  3. awaqa909

    awaqa909 United States Steel Registered Member

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    This is what I've found and I think it's part of the official glock website. http://eu.glock.com/english/outdoor_knives.htm I've been getting mixed answers on what the blade is made out of. I also don't really know anything about metals, only that knives have high carbon steel. Why do you say that about the Tennifer treatment? Is it unsafe for food? Or is it just not going to come off? Read a bit of wiki about it, looks complicated.
     
  4. ghostdncr

    ghostdncr United States Active Member Active Member

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    1095 makes an excellent knife and I found several references to that as being the steel used in the G81. Tennifer is one of the hardest, toughest surface treatments I've ever encountered. As it was explained to me, it's an advanced form of cyanide-based case hardening. You'll only see it on items made overseas because the US EPA will not sign off on the disposal of the by products. Again, that's what I was told and the apparent absence of any US products using the process seems to support this. In his book "Gunsmithing", Roy Dunlap talked about the cyanide hardening process and how extremely dangerous it was. Interesting stuff, but definitely not something I'd want to be cooking in my basement!
     

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