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Countershaft Wear - So How Bad Is This ?

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graham-xrf

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#1
It seems that first clean-up easily leads to fix-it-up addiction.
The South Bend 9c, acquired unexpectedly at a crazy bargain price, has things going on in the drive countershaft.

I took this bit apart, because the previous owner had "re-arranged" things to mount it upside down on a piece of 2" x 4" wood fixed to the floor instead of bolting it to the underside of the bench. This required the 3-speed pulley to be mounted on the shaft the turned to be the other way about. I think the oil-wick cups ended up upside down also. Probably it has seen some running without proper oiling.

1) I could just put it all back, as it is, but properly, and hope the present condition is not going to deteriorate in accelerated fashion. Does this wear matter much? Can I ignore it?
2) Replace it? It is a piece of 7/8" steel with a taper pin hole through it.

In the picture, I have positioned it somewhat as it should be if it were mounted up under the tailstock, as per the SB drawings, with oil wick cups facing upwards. The larger belt pulley is supposed to be toward the spoked wheel, with the small end to the right, to suit the pulley on the headstock.

The condition of the cast iron shaft journals is also a bit scored, just like the shaft.

There is an obvious "Catch-22" in trying to turn anything, but 7/8" is maybe very available standard stock, even if the ends were just hacksawed. The problem is, I have no idea what it takes to make a taper-pin hole.

SB9c Underdrive Shaft-1.JPG SB9c  Drive.png SB9c Underdrive Shaft-2.JPG SB9c Underdrive Shaft-5.JPG
 

jeff_g1137

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#2
Hi
It does not look to bad in the photos,
is there a lot of play in the shaft,
set it up & run it, if you do not like it put in a new shaft.
Is it oil or grease.
The taper-pin hole, you need a taper-pin reamer. ebay
jeff
 

chips&more

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#3
Yes, it’s scored, but now those grooves are good for oil retention. If the shaft does not flop around, I would just run it…Good Luck, Dave.
 

graham-xrf

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#4
Hi
It does not look to bad in the photos,
is there a lot of play in the shaft,
set it up & run it, if you do not like it put in a new shaft.
Is it oil or grease.
The taper-pin hole, you need a taper-pin reamer. ebay
jeff
Thanks for the reply Jeff. I do appreciate because I have no idea what is considered damaging bad scoring
The shaft fits tight, and rotates with no slop or rattle at all. I drove it out with a piece of copper water piping off-cut.

To get it out, I first had to file down the little high spot burr where the collar grub screw and also the main pulley screw had bit. At some stage, someone had chose to tighten the pully grub screw at a place other than the provided hollow made for it.

Not grease - but little oil cups that feed wicks that run in a slot along the journal hole.
OK - I wash out the wicks with alcohol, , and we put it all back using the right grade of oil.
Feeling better about it now :)
 

TommyD

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#5
If the dia of the shaft is still good I would think it would function properly, and it seems so.

Ain't it funny how cheap stuff gets pricey in terms of time to 'clean' it up and get it working?
 

barkoguru

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#6
My 9c was way worse than that, I just shot a little grease in it now and then and it worked just fine, with the tension off the belt I could shake it around in the bore but when tight and running it ran just fine, I'd emory or stone yours, keep it oiled and run it, you'll probably never notice it, jmho.
 

wildo

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#7
Mine looks about the same. My plan is to line bore the countershaft casting and install oilite bearings. I'll stone the shaft itself to ensure it's smooth. You can get oilite bearings on ebay for about $29. I don't know how easy it will be to do the boring, but I think it will be a fun project to try. I did buy and extra countershaft so I can actually use the lathe for the project (no mill yet).

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Drive-Bearing-Kit-For-South-Bend-Lathe-9-10k-/152044211069
 

fixit

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#8
Mine looks about the same. My plan is to line bore the countershaft casting and install oilite bearings. I'll stone the shaft itself to ensure it's smooth. You can get oilite bearings on ebay for about $29. I don't know how easy it will be to do the boring, but I think it will be a fun project to try. I did buy and extra countershaft so I can actually use the lathe for the project (no mill yet).

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Drive-Bearing-Kit-For-South-Bend-Lathe-9-10k-/152044211069
McMaster-Carr has .875" id X 1" od X 1.5" oilite sleeve bearing $3.11 each, could be cut to fit

fixit
 

wildo

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#9
McMaster-Carr has .875" id X 1" od X 1.5" oilite sleeve bearing $3.11 each, could be cut to fit

fixit
Good to know! With shipping, it's only a few dollars cheaper, but still- that's a positive savings...
 

Glenn Brooks

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#11
Taper pins usually are made by drilling the hole (undersize) with two different sized drill bits. Drill the shaft thru and thru with the smaller diameter bit. Then turn shaftmover and drill the top half of the hole with the larger bit. Then run your tapered reamer down the hole to create a smooth taper for the pin. Hole always must be smaller than largest diameter of the pin. That way the pin wedges nice and tight in the Hole. When it gets worn, ream a little more- fresh diameter, and wedge the pin again at the larger diameter. Neat stuff!
 
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