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618

Discussion in 'ATLAS, CRAFTSMAN & AA' started by westsailpat, Apr 19, 2017.

  1. westsailpat

    westsailpat United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    It has been explained to me that my 101.07301 6" Craftsman should not be called a 618 and I thank HM for that information as I like to refer to things properly . I have been reading up on this subject here at HM and clearly there is a 618 not to be confused with a 6" 101.07301 , It's a little confusing because the 618 has a 6" swing but it is a different machine . http://www.ebay.com/itm/MACHINIST-TOOL-LATHE-Small-Atlas-618-Hobby-Jeweler-Lathe-6/171502063743?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid=222007&algo=SIC.MBE&ao=2&asc=40130&meid=aa767660f65d4cae858a104ac2af463a&pid=100005&rk=6&rkt=6&mehot=pp&sd=272633106008
     
  2. westsailpat

    westsailpat United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Here is another 618 the differences are subtle but to my untrained eye they are , the riser at the tail stock has it's mount holes on both sides rather than at the rear as on the 101.07301 also the compound is more squared off . This particular machine I think is a good deal mainly because it comes with the original cast iron legs .
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/ATLAS-618-6...e94b205&pid=100009&rk=1&rkt=1&sd=171502063743
     
  3. wa5cab

    wa5cab Downloads Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Pat,

    The Atlas 618 that you saw on eBay has an Atlas 10100 MK-II compound slide on it. The 618 originally came with the same compound slide and cross slide as the 101.07301.

    For some unknown reason, dating all the way back to the first 9" in 1932, Sears has always ordered different legs on the 9", 12" and 6" that Atlas built for them. The majority of the other parts are the same as whatever Atlas was currently supplying on their 9", 10" or 6".

    Yes, your machine is a 6x18 but not a 618. Up until the 10F came out and they changed their model number assignment system, the model numbers were made up from numbers that describe the size of the lathe. Up through the 10D and 10E, all model numbers began with the one or two-digit swing, followed usually by the bed length. So a 1036 would be a 10: with a 36" bed. A 1054 is the same lathe but with a 54" bed. Exceptions were the 918, 612 and 618 where the first digit is the swing and the second digit was the distance between centers. The reason for doing that with the 918 was that the 936 number was already used for the 36" bed compound drive machine. The 918 was the simpler and cheaper utility lathe with no compound drive and no back gears. Why they chose to do it with the 612 and 618 no one knows.

    The 618, with Timken bearings and back gears, came out in 1937 (catalog year, probably printed late in 1936). It had the first version countershaft with the bracket swung off of the rear of the headstock. The first 6" lathe that Atlas built for Sears, the 101.07300, came out in 1938. It had a smaller spindle with 3/4"-16 threads, 1MT taper and sleeve bearings. And no back gears. Most of the other parts were the same as on the current 618. The following year, Atlas revised the countershaft on the 618 and started building the 101.07301 for Sears. It now had 1"-8 threads and 2MTspindle taper. Most parts on the 101.07301 are the same as those used on the 618. Exceptions, besides the legs, were the headstock casting, spindle, and spindle thrust bearing, all because of the sleeve bearings. All other parts were the same. Around 1940, Atlas revised the countershaft assembly on the 618 but continued to supply what was the second 618 version on the 101.07301 up through end of production in 1957. A fair number of 101.07301's have had the countershaft assembly replaced with the third version 618 unit. The notable differences between the 2nd and 3rd version countershaft assemblies are that the newer compound bracket is taller and curved, and the pulleys hang down below the bracket, instead of sticking up above it.
     
  4. Superburban

    Superburban United States Active Member Active Member

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    I'm no Atlas expert (but I did stay at a holiday inn). I have only seen the square compound on the Atlas MK2 lathes. And those I have seen two designs, one that used the original oval shaped slide screw holder, and a later with a rectangle holder.

    The real issue as to which is the better deal, is how close the prospective buyer lives to the seller. I have gotten many great deals on E-bay by looking for large items near me, knowing the list of competing buyers is limited. Many times I was the only bidder.

    http://www.lathes.co.uk/atlas6inch/page2.html

    http://www.lathes.co.uk/atlas6inch/
     
  5. westsailpat

    westsailpat United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 20, 2017
  6. wa5cab

    wa5cab Downloads Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    As I wrote above, the sleeve bearing 101.07301 came out in 1939. And for whatever reason, the Sears machines made by Atlas from 1932 until 1937 always had a 3-hole leg bolt pattern. That stopped at the end of 1957 when the 1/2" bed 12" machines came out and the 6" changed to the 101.21400 (identical to the 618). Maybe the guy at Sears who preferred the three hole mounting pattern finally retired. In both cases, except for nameplate, all of the Sears versions were identical to the Atlas versions.

    The Atlas 3950 (the ball bearing model that came out c. 1972 and the one that was also sold by Sears as 101.21200) had the same compound assembly as the 618. Parts M6-301, M6-302 and M6-303 plus the smaller parts. The Atlas 10100 (the tapered roller bearing model that came out c. mid-1977 and was not sold by Sears) was according to the manuals supposed to have the flat compound slide and rectangular cross feed thrust bearing plate. However, up through S/N 1301 (of what info we have), they still came with the early compound, compound thrust plate, rack, etc. After that,it appears that most got the late compound and eventually late everything. Occasionally one turns up with an early component. It could be that Atlas turned up an early component and decided to use it or they could be replacements.
     
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