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Worthless Tools Gallery. What Tools do you regret buying?

ogberi

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#61
I have a couple of air chisels that seemed like a good idea 35 years ago, but never really get used. I bought them for cutting and separating exhaust system parts. They *will* work for that, but there are many other tools that work better. Even at that time, an oxy-acetylene cutting torch was faster and easier, and nowadays plasma.

Both of my air chisels still work like new (I keep them well oiled), but they haven't been used for an actual job in over 30 years. I smile when I walk through the DIY stores and see new air chisels amongst the other air tools. I wonder who is buying them and what they are using them for.

GG
Easy. Cut the end off the chisel, press fit a plastic block and use it for ramming up greensand molds. Works a treat except for the beating your wrists take. A similarly modified needle scaler works better, but I've had no luck getting one that works more than a few minutes.
 

petcnc

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#62
i've gota vice that looks very similer, mine has provided good results, what issues did you have with it?

the kurt one does look very very solid :)

Stuart
stupoty I might have been out of luck with all my vises.
This vise came from ARCEurotrade (UK) and I bought it together with my Sieg X2 mill.
It came with a manual with accuracy tests measurements on it that I suspect are an exact copy in all manuals.
My vise failed miserably in three of the following accuracy tests

IMG_004.jpg
G1 0.1
G6 0.1
G8 0.2 on a length of 50mm

As for the rest of the tests I'm not sure I can verify them so I presume they are correct

In plain words that translates as follows.
The body of the vise was not parallel to the base. i.e. when I tested the surfaces on which the jaw moved for parallelism with the base I found that the reading was not equal at the two ends (lower at the far end from fix jaw).
The movable jaw was too loose to hold the work against fixed jaw without a round bar. The main reason for that loosenes was that the movable jaw body was 0.1 thicker and the holding bars had a 0.1 gap between moving jaw and the vise body (the little white area between red and green in the following drawing)
Sketch.jpg

Fixing it was pretty simple!
I made the surface of the body parallel to the base using my fly cutter
and I reduced the thickness of the moving jaw skimming the base of it so there is (virtually) no gap between holding bars and vise body.

BTW
ARCEUROTRADE give them vises away for nearly half price now. If I was in UK I might buy the bigger one (100mm) and fix it.

ARC100.jpg

it is not bad for £46.75 including VAT.
BUT...
I live in Greece and I do not wish to pay another £25 p&p. I don't think is worth it.

Thanks for your interest on the subject

Petros

PS

the KURT-STYLE one looks VERY solid but 16 kilos is far toooooooo heavy for my little x2 mill

IMG_004.jpg Sketch.jpg ARC100.jpg
 
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GarageGuy

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#63
Easy. Cut the end off the chisel, press fit a plastic block and use it for ramming up greensand molds. Works a treat except for the beating your wrists take. A similarly modified needle scaler works better, but I've had no luck getting one that works more than a few minutes.
That's a great idea. I am planning to build a home foundry in the next year or two. It would be easy to make a chisel with a big flat face to ram a flask. Thank you!

GG
 

stupoty

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#64
Intersting about the vice, i just checked, i got mine from http://www.glostertooling.co.uk/

i will try and have a check of the specs, i havn't mesured mine to be honest. I've managed to gang mill parts that came out within <0.02mm and i tend to check it with indicators if i'm working on things that are particulaly critical.

Stuart
 

Round in circles

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#66
30 or so years ago I spent £40 inc taxes on a handsaw designed to cut fired brick and light weight blocks ( It would be about £120 sterling , USD $ 200 ish ? ) these days .
T'was a lovely job , each CTC tooth was silver soldered in the blade at four to the inch and the profiles of each tooth was brilliant .


I wanted to make a new door way from our lounge into the kitchen and brick up the old one to make the off lounge dining area twice as large . What I didn't want to do was start hammering & grinding during the evenings & making a hell of a dust mess.

A dust sheet either side of the wall and an hour or so of gentle sawing should soon see me cut the two 6 foot nine long verticals.
I carefully plumbed the wall , drew on fine marker pen lines to follow, then drilled the top two corner holes as square as I could .
Checked the trueness with a right angle found they were square on, drew the verts on the other side & proceeded to use an 8 mm TCT masonry drill off hammer to make the saw start slots for each side of the frame hole . I drilled them from both sides just to be accurate , it wasn't long before I had two nice and clean 8 inch long slots on each side to insert the saw.
Stood on a well set trestle board arrangement , I slid the saw in and took the first gentle push forward.
It felt weird knowing that I was sawing brick so easy , as I pulled the saw back for the next stoke I saw it was now devoid of all the teeth that had passed through the hole .

Arrrrragh LOUDLY !

I collected all the teeth and cleaned up . Took the saw back to the tool shop the next day and handed over the teeth and saw.
" OMG Dave , your the third guy who has had a saw like that , never mind here is a more expensive replacement , see how you get on with that. "

That evening after setting up again I slid the saw in the slot and gently pressed it forward . Yep ,all the bloody teeth came out on the first stroke forwards. A my wife of three months, " Alison " was laughing & giggling fit to pee herself . ( Even today she still finds it funny )

Fuming I cleaned up and decided to take a simple soft thermal brick to the tool shop the next morning and a basic house brick


Ron the counter man who was free had a worried look in his face when he saw the bricks . There was another guy to my right banging his fist on the table giving the sales man a right ear bending , he too had one of these " More expensive " saws.

I made a joke about it all and declared , " Ron if you can cut these two blocks in half with a new saw I'll bugger off and say it's me at fault , if however you get the same result give me a nine inch angle grinder and TCT diamond impregnated brick blade .

" Errr I'd better get the boss Dave ..

By now there were several more customers hoping to get served . I carefully & calmly explained the situation to Mal the outfit boss and repeated my offer . By now there was 16 guys queued up behind us starting to chunter & mutter as they drank their freebie teas ,coffee's or chocolate drinks out the free vend machine in the shop .

Full of bravado , Mal , in front of an ever growing queue of potential customers took me up on the offer , dragged a new workmate portable bench/ vice off the display stand , inserted the soft thermal brick and gently drew the saw back four inches across the block to start the cut .....Ratta tat tatter tat ....15 teeth fell out .

" OAF ", he said to Ron, ( Well it sounded a bit similar) " Give him the top of the range Bosch 9 inch angle grinder and a 9 inch Diamond Borth blade "

The guy with the other saw said, "What about me " ? ... A crestfallen Mal then said , " Aye you too " .
You should have heard the cheer that went up from the other guys in the shop .

That incident kept me a faithful customer of the tool shop for the next 20 years or so till I moved from the area , last time I visited family in the area the shop was still going strong in the same name . Thought I didn't see any brick cutting handsaws in the brickies tool section of one of the big shop front windows .
 
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Downwindtracker2

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#67
Some of my first power tool purchases were from Sears,70s, top of the line jig saw, 1/3 sheet orbital sander, and a belt sander. I began to see a pattern. Craftsman.
 

TomS

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#68
Bought a Harbor Freight punch and die set. The plastic punch guide broke the first time I used it. Might be OK for punching holes in gasket material but doesn't work well for brass shim stock.
 
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MikeWi

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#69
After my wife ran our gas powered string trimmer with raw gas and ruined the engine, I had the bright idea of buying a Ryobi electric string trimmer that used the same 18 volt battery that my cordless saw used. Note that this was before they came out with their ONE battery system and the fancy batteries. The battery was a simple Ni-Cad pack. Anyway it lasted all of about 5 minutes before running out of power. Maybe the new batteries would do better, but it was sold with the intent to use the pack that I have. Simply garbage. Battery still works fine in my saw.
 

Fabrickator

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#70
I have found my contour sander quite useful. You have to expect to change a SMALL piece of sand paper pretty often. It's SMALL. I have found mine useful for polishing knife blades I am making,with wet or dry paper. saves my old fingers!!:)
Thanks for the tip George. I'll have to dig it out from the bottom of the tool cabinet next time I sharpen a knife.
 

Smithdoor

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#71
I had one it was Gisholt 5L weight 44,000 pounds had up grade to power shot to 480 volt 24" foundation, new 32" chuck, tooling and 2,500 miles of shipping Use one time.

Gisholt 5L.jpg
 

JimDawson

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#72
I had one it was Gisholt 5L weight 44,000 pounds had up grade to power shot to 480 volt 24" foundation, new 32" chuck, tooling and 2,500 miles of shipping Use one time.

That's an expensive paperweight. :lmao:
 

Smithdoor

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#73
Did not work as a paperweight it crush the desk :whiteflag:

I had others that for themes all ever week

9A south bend and 4 J&L turret best tools ever got use for over 30 years
Today I am down to just the 9a

Dave

That's an expensive paperweight. :lmao:
 

Downwindtracker2

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#74
I also have a Porter-Cable profile sander, it worked for me. I used it to sand the some of the tighter corners on the inside of a cedar-strip canoe. But I use the much longer adhesive backed rolls from Lee Valley. I made a profile with a 2" radius as well. I've used the sander on the barrel channel of gun stocks, too.
 
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george wilson

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#75
Fabrickator: Please note,I said I POLISHED new knife blades with the contour sander. I do not SHARPEN the blades with it. That would not work at all. It would just rip the sand paper.

I have used my sander with wet or dry paper to polish the hollow ground surfaces of knives that I've made. It works real well,and saves a lot of elbow grease. I can shine up a heat treated blade till it's like a mirror with the contour sander,and increasingly finer wet or dry,down to 2000 grit. Use a bit of soapy water or you'll load up the paper very quickly.

This Bowie style knife was polished with the sander. I made it out of D2,which is a lot of work to polish,being a very abrasion resistant steel.

You can also keep the surfaces nice and crisp,without rounding everything off. I don't want surfaces that look buffed to death,and you don't see buffed to death surfaces on antique knives. All is crisp and sharp edged looking.

_DSC0793.jpg
 

railfancwb

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#76
The ones I misplace (forever) before using them for the intended purpose. The misplaced ones I do find just after having given up and bought another.
 

NoobCanuk

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#77
Not to break the spirit of the thread but, what do you use to cut cement board. I was gifted 28 4 x 8 sheets of cement siding, it has a wood grain on it, painted white (primer?) Plan on using it to line the blacksmith shop. I made a couple of cuts with a 7 inch metal cutting abrasive wheel in the skill saw, lots of dust and horribly slow. Picked up a masonry one, is it going to be any better?

Greg

Will post some of my useless purchases, will just have to think which were the worst.
Hi Greg,
I have worked a bit with the cement siding just never seen a 4X8 sheet. I normally use the stuff that is approx 16"X12 ft (ish can't remember exact width). Ive seen 2 different tools to cut that stuff with though. You can get a specific circular saw blade for that stuff (I think Home Depot may carry them) or I have also use a heavy duty scissor like pneumatic thing to cut it with. The scissor thing had 2 heavy side pieces with a third one in the center. It pretty much lasts forever and does a neat job cutting the cement board... just a bit slow but not too bad and not nearly the mess of a circular saw.

http://www.homedepot.ca/product/fib...140203__ALL_PLA-823909&pid=823909&kpid=823909

That was a 2 sec google search but something like that. The one I used at work had 2 sides and the center shear and it worked fine if I recall correctly. No matter what the edge trim we had for the cement board had to be cut using circular saw (too thick for the shears). Only use a circular saw blade if you are desperate... that cement board with dull your blades in a couple cuts as you will notice right away. The specific blades for cement board will last a lot longer though but they still dull after a day of use. At work when we cut that stuff the max we got was 3 easy days of cuts with a cement board blade.

Sorry to ramble but I hope it helps ya.

Curt
 

jpfabricator

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#78
A cambell hausfeld battery charger from tractor supply. It would turn on, charge for a few seconds then turn off. I smashed it to pieces.
The northern tool brand 115 volt 110 amp mig welder. Not enough power, and really splatterd alot. I sold it on craigslist.
I dont buy royobi products after having a sawsall that lasted 2 months.

Jake Parker
 

sk1nner

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#79
Ryobi 18 volt cordless drill kit (nicad) and 4 extra battery's. I thought that it would be great nto having to mess with cords. Every time I needed it battery's were dead (hence 4 extras) so I ended up having to keep a battery on the charger all of the time, not good for them. They never held a charge long enough either. Oh well back to my good old plug ins that always work and have more power than I need.
 

Bill Gruby

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#80
Ryobi 18 volt cordless drill kit (nicad) and 4 extra battery's. I thought that it would be great nto having to mess with cords. Every time I needed it battery's were dead (hence 4 extras) so I ended up having to keep a battery on the charger all of the time, not good for them. They never held a charge long enough either. Oh well back to my good old plug ins that always work and have more power than I need.
Not so fast on counting that drill out. One of my next projects is to make a Tapping Machine out of one, replacing the batteries with a 0-24 volt power supply. Stay tuned on that one. :thinking:

"Billy G"
 

18w

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#82
What tools do I regret buying? Most everyone of them that I cheaped out on or didn't stop to think how many of the old timers did things with out all the new trick must have....make that well marketed... widgets.
Purchase in haste,repent in leisure as they say.

Darrell
 

David S

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#83
Ok I have been thinking. Finally it dawned on me. Back in the 70's I wanted to be able to weld and braze small stuff, but didn't have much $$. So I bought a Solid Ox welding kit. Propane tank with Oxygen pellets that you lit and put in a tube to feed the torch. Oh my what a piece of work. I did manage to do some good stuff with it, but it soon went to the recycle bin.

David
 

GarageGuy

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#84
So I bought a Solid Ox welding kit. Propane tank with Oxygen pellets that you lit and put in a tube to feed the torch. Oh my what a piece of work.
I had the same setup. You had to weld or braze fast, because those oxygen pellets didn't last very long. They were expensive as heck, and the only way we could get them was by mail order. You could also use Mapp gas instead of propane, but that made it even more expensive. The aluminum pellet canister was prone to corrosion because of the heat and oxygen rich environment. Very nearly worthless. I had forgotten about it! You're right, that would have been around 1976 maybe.

GG
 

extropic

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#85
Top of the line Craftsman "Commercial" series router and 7" angle grinder (bought in the mid to late '70s). Both run unreasonably hot in a short time on light work. Relegated to a poor use of storage space these days.

More recently, a Harbor Freight Gear Driven Ring Roller (#36790) is a real POS. Incredibly poor parts quality. The holes don't line up in the front and rear plates (which should be identical parts. That means, among other things, that the rollers aren't parallel causing it to roll spirals rather than rings. I can't imagine that those plates aren't punched complete in one hit on a big press. Apparently they have more than one press working and they produce considerably different parts. Also, the adjustable link that carries the adjustable roller is a plastic part, which distorts in use, contributing to the 'spiral' output. Rated at 3/16 x 1" capacity. I would suggest much less, maybe 1/8 x 1" would be OK. There were chunks of swarf stuck (really stuck) to the gears. The first one I bought had such obvious run-out of the rollers that I bought another, mixed & matched parts for best fit, and returned the unused set (I hope you didn't buy it). The unit is more of a project than a tool.
 

silence dogood

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#86
The most worthless tool was not the one I bought, but a two legged one that walked into my shop. My neighbor had an odd assortment of tools that he used to work on his pickup. He was of the ram-jam brute force type of mechanic. After he came into my shop, he immediately picked up a micrometer of mine. I watched him with consternation as he fiddled with the mike and then handed it back to me closed, all the while explaining what a fine machinist that he was. I then explained to him that no one touches any of my tools without my permission. I also explained to him that he just proved to me that he was full of it. Strange, he ended up being upset with me. Oh well. if one lends and is able to get a tool back from a guy like that, it would end up being worse than useless. Mark
 

atunguyd

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#87
The most worthless tool was not the one I bought, but a two legged one that walked into my shop. My neighbor had an odd assortment of tools that he used to work on his pickup. He was of the ram-jam brute force type of mechanic. After he came into my shop, he immediately picked up a micrometer of mine. I watched him with consternation as he fiddled with the mike and then handed it back to me closed, all the while explaining what a fine machinist that he was. I then explained to him that no one touches any of my tools without my permission. I also explained to him that he just proved to me that he was full of it. Strange, he ended up being upset with me. Oh well. if one lends and is able to get a tool back from a guy like that, it would end up being worse than useless. Mark
At the risk of sounding as useless as your neighbor, may I ask the reason why handing the micrometer back closed proved that he is not a machinist?

Must admit I just leave mine in whatever measurement I last used it in.

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk
 

JimDawson

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#88
At the risk of sounding as useless as your neighbor, may I ask the reason why handing the micrometer back closed proved that he is not a machinist?

Must admit I just leave mine in whatever measurement I last used it in.

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk

Good question. It was explained to me about 50 years ago by my shop teacher. Always put a 0 reading (like 0 to 1) mic away with it open a bit, (maybe 0.025 or so) so that if the temperature changes, the mic won't expand and spring the mic frame. There may be other reasons to do it also, but I'm not aware of them. But every machinist I know leave their mics open a bit. It just seems to be the right thing to do. Leaving it open further than 0.025 would be fine, like you I normally leave mine where I last measured, but just not 0.
 

atunguyd

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#90
Thanks guys. So in my case my laziness is a good thing. I have a Starrett mic that I bought from a pan broker (who did not know the real value) and came with calibrated 25mm ring and no case. I have always kept the calibrating ring sandwiched between the mic's jaws so as not to lose it. I may now change that practise.

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk
 
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