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Wood Taps , From Scratch

Ulma Doctor

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#1
Hi Guys,
i'm at it again...:pickaxe:
here it is ,
a 3/4"-10 TPI 3 Flute Wood Tap, from Scratch MKI
this is my first attempt at tap making.
i have recently become interested in making some threads in wood to make clamps and other wood projects that could use threaded parts.
there are many reputable companies that manufacture them.
i, instead, took it upon myself to make one from scratch.
the material is 7/8" 12L14 hexagonal steel.
overall length is 3-1/2"
minor diameter is .625"
major diameter .740"
2016-03-05.jpg 2016-03-05.jpg
the hex was turned on a lathe to .670" to get the major diameter
then threaded to 10 threads per inch to a minor diameter of .625"
the end was tapered to 15*, the pilot end is turned to .600" diameter.
2016-03-05.jpg 2016-03-05.jpg
the flutes were cut in a vertical mill, at 10* relief angle.
this steel is relatively soft and doesn't harden or weld well due to small traces of lead, but it is a dream to make things from 12L14 because it machines very nicely.
the nut was store bought, to test the class of fit on my turned piece.
2016-03-05.jpg 2016-03-05.jpg
project cost $2.89
total time 45 mins :grin: (1 hr 20 mins with mistakes...:bang head: )

i hope this inspires others to make their own tools, even if they think they can't !
as always, thank you for reading!
 

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Tony Wells

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#2
Maybe I'm seeing it wrong, but isn't your gash/relief on there backwards? Unless it is a left hand tap, that is. And 0.670 seems awful small for a 3/4-10 tap OD. But, it's really late so maybe I'm all wet.
 

TommyD

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#3
Nice work........buttttt

Minor dia for a 3/4-12 is .624......a 3/4-10 is .600. Rut-row Reorge

I KID, I KID!!

Actually my dims ARE right, according to a 1944 Popular Mechanics I found while trying to figger it out.

https://books.google.com/books?id=I...ved=0ahUKEwiipNDt3avLAhXJvoMKHTBADpcQ6AEIZjAQ

It never occurred to me that taps would be used to make threads in wood.....and I remember seeing threaded bungs on chair legs I took off my parents furniture as a kid.:confused 3:

There is a BUNCH of info on that link I attached....I hope is right. You opened my eyes, thanks!
 

FOMOGO

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#4
Lot of good info in those articles, and the adds at the end are great. Thanks for posting. Mike
 

Ulma Doctor

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#5
Maybe I'm seeing it wrong, but isn't your gash/relief on there backwards? Unless it is a left hand tap, that is. And 0.670 seems awful small for a 3/4-10 tap OD. But, it's really late so maybe I'm all wet.
Hi Tony,
i'm glad that you caught my mistake in the relieving of the tap. thank you!
i did make another mistake in reporting the major diameter, it is .740",
i don't even know how i did that...:bang head:
must have been looking at the wrong piece of paper, or trying to do too much again....:)
i guess this gives me opportunity to try relieving the tap once more, the correct direction!
thanks for your interest and input,
i'll be sure to post the end result!
 
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Ulma Doctor

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#6
after making a couple mistakes, i think i'm back on track....
i changed mill tooling from a 3/8" 4 flute endmill,
to a 2 flute 3/8" ball endmill and reversed the tap in the vise and repeated the relief procedure, again!
here's the end result...
FullSizeRender%2B%25282%2529.jpg
it looks more like a commercial tap now.
whaddya think???
 

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Ulma Doctor

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#7
Nice work........buttttt
Minor dia for a 3/4-12 is .624......a 3/4-10 is .600. Rut-row Reorge
I KID, I KID!!
Actually my dims ARE right, according to a 1944 Popular Mechanics I found while trying to figger it out.
https://books.google.com/books?id=I...ved=0ahUKEwiipNDt3avLAhXJvoMKHTBADpcQ6AEIZjAQ
It never occurred to me that taps would be used to make threads in wood.....and I remember seeing threaded bungs on chair legs I took off my parents furniture as a kid.:confused 3:
There is a BUNCH of info on that link I attached....I hope is right. You opened my eyes, thanks!
Thank you Tommy D.!
the information in the link is very helpful, i appreciate your input! :grin:
 

Ulma Doctor

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#9
Of course, now you need to make a threading box for the mating tenons :)
Thank you Tony for your wisdom!!!:tranquility:
Yes Sir, the threading box is on the horizon.:big grin:

since i have a general plan as to how to make the taps,:black eye:
i'm considering making a few taps of different sizes since i'm in that mode right now.
i don't know if i'll make a "full set" but i'm thinking 1/2, 3/4, 7/8, and 1" for now.:grin big:
 

Tony Wells

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#10
I've watched Roy Underhill a few times and he has access to, or owns, some pretty cool old tools. He has taps and boxes for various sizes. I don't know whether there is a standard (of course, we who make our own tools are not bound) pitch for wooden threads, but I suspect there are. I'm sure there are episodes on youtube. You might pick up some tips from him. In case you don't know who he is, he hosts the "Woodwright's Shop" I believe. It's not in production as far as I know, but I still record the reruns on Saturday evening for later viewing. Although he always seems a little rushed and rough doing his TV demonstrations, I'm quite sure he is capable of very fine work. He's the real deal.....lol, check out his cut and gouged fingers and hands. He nearly always has a black nail. Sometimes bleeds on episodes.

Keep up the good work, Mike. Someone has to make all the tools for woodworkers of the world!


I might add that if you settle on a pitch, your thread box need only to be adjustable to make all the common diameters you make taps for. Just a hint.
 

Bob Korves

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#11
Nice job on the tap, Mike! What is this "wood" you are speaking of? Sometimes I think you are going over to the dark side... 8^)

(Full disclosure: I am currently making a stand/cabinet for my carbide grinder out of w**d. I am using all the old scraps and hardware I have laying around in my shop, trying to make a silk purse out of a sow's ear. Pics when it is done...)
 

Ulma Doctor

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#12
I've watched Roy Underhill a few times and he has access to, or owns, some pretty cool old tools. He has taps and boxes for various sizes. I don't know whether there is a standard (of course, we who make our own tools are not bound) pitch for wooden threads, but I suspect there are. I'm sure there are episodes on youtube. You might pick up some tips from him. In case you don't know who he is, he hosts the "Woodwright's Shop" I believe. It's not in production as far as I know, but I still record the reruns on Saturday evening for later viewing. Although he always seems a little rushed and rough doing his TV demonstrations, I'm quite sure he is capable of very fine work. He's the real deal.....lol, check out his cut and gouged fingers and hands. He nearly always has a black nail. Sometimes bleeds on episodes.
Keep up the good work, Mike. Someone has to make all the tools for woodworkers of the world!
I might add that if you settle on a pitch, your thread box need only to be adjustable to make all the common diameters you make taps for. Just a hint.
Thank You Tony,
I aspire to be like Roy Underhill, as a matter of fact.
His teachings are a part of the reason why i have the fairly recent interest in woodworking.
i watched as a kid, but didn't understand his genius.
not that i can understand his genius now, i can just now better appreciate it.:tranquility:
i have seen the episodes of the Woodwright's Shop you have described and try to gather any other tidbits of information i can pull from the Master, Roy .
thank you for the suggestion!
thank you for the guidance too!:grin:

Nice job on the tap, Mike! What is this "wood" you are speaking of? Sometimes I think you are going over to the dark side... 8^)

(Full disclosure: I am currently making a stand/cabinet for my carbide grinder out of w**d. I am using all the old scraps and hardware I have laying around in my shop, trying to make a silk purse out of a sow's ear. Pics when it is done...)
Hi Bob,
to know the light, one must contemplate the dark(side) :tranquility:
:congratulate:
 

Ulma Doctor

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#14
well i finally got around to testing the wood tap in some western cedar...
the bolt is a commercially made 3/4-10X 4 bolt

2016-03-13.jpg
very nice , sharp threads!
2016-03-13.jpg
the tap works very well.
now to put the ideas to use.....:grin:
 

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T Bredehoft

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#15
I din't know I needed a special tap for wood, I've been using regular 5/16 18s for some time in mahogany, putting cap screws in them for tooling.
 

Tony Wells

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#16
You really don't, Tom. I believe in the older, traditional methods however, coarser threads were the norm for wood. I don't remember seeing them (nor looking specifically for them) in the MH, but that's what I recall seeing. I'm sure there are standards for that.
 

roadie33

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#17
I believe the coarse threads were used to diminish the chance for tear out in the wood and end up with a cleaner thread.
 

Ulma Doctor

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#18
i'm at it again....:grin:
a chunk of 11/16 hexagonal 12L14 just became a tool!
2016-03-13.jpg
i just finished the 5/8"-11 tpi wood tap to accompany the lonely 3/4"-10 tpi made earlier
i used a 5/8 USS coarse nut to test the fit! :D
2016-03-13.jpg
now for the my other desired sizes......
stay tuned!;)
 

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Ulma Doctor

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#19
Here's a copy of a magazine article with the specs for wood,
follow as you see fit!

FullSizeRender%2B%25283%2529.jpg
 

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Ulma Doctor

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#21
How do you cut the relief and at what angle?
Hi Roadie, thank you for your interest!

i used a vertical mill with a 3/8" ball endmill and an inexpensive angle vise, like this one here

the relief angle was set at 10* on the vise, the hex end was held in the jaws horizontally.
i used a thin parallel to keep the tap level during the relief operation.
the tap was relieved off center, on 3 sides, to rake the cutting side teeth for aid in thread cutting.
 
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Ulma Doctor

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#23
You are very welcome,Mike
the 12L14 may not be the best choice of material for a tap that will see heavy use.
you may wish to make yours from 01 tool steel or other high carbon alloy if it's gonna see a lot of cellulose :)
 

T Bredehoft

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#24
Sure, wood needs more stock between the threads for strength. That's logical. I'm just using "finger tight" on my fixturing. I'd want stronger threads should I be putting any torque on them.
 

T Bredehoft

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#28
Coat the threads with CA Glue and tap them again after the glue dries. You will have threads of steel.
Don't know why I didn't think of that....I use CA all the time in my 'factory'. It's like glass to saw through, ought to make really tough threads.
 

Ulma Doctor

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#29
well, i punched out a couple more wood taps in the last couple days
here's the update pictures...
i added a 1/2"-8tpi tap . i used 1/2" 12L14 hex
2016-03-23.jpg and a 1-1/8"-8 tpi , i used 1-3/8" 12L14 hex 2016-03-23.jpg

here's a picture of the collection so far
2016-03-23.jpg
thanks for looking!:)
 

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