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[How do I?] Wiring Up A Treadmill Motor (i Know, I Know)

Discussion in 'ELECTRICAL ISSUES - POWER YOUR MACHINES & SHOP' started by mattthemuppet, Jul 21, 2015.

  1. hmwhitehead

    hmwhitehead United States Harry's Workshop Registered Member

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    Not sure why the drawing did not get uploaded, I have not looked at this board in a while, so sorry for not getting the information out sooner. Here is the schmatic, hopefully it will be uploaded. MC-60 Motor Controller 1.jpg
     
  2. mattthemuppet

    mattthemuppet Active User Active Member

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    that's super useful, thanks!
     
  3. Mad Monty

    Mad Monty Iron Registered Member

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    Thanks for posting the whole schematic with part IDs, waveforms and voltages. It must have taken you hours to do.
     
  4. QCaudill

    QCaudill United States Iron Registered Member

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    I know this is an old thread, so I hope it's ok to post here. I'm just getting started in DC powering my wood lathe with an MC-60 controller. I know very little about metal, but quite accomplished with wood. Again, I hope it's ok to post here. My electronic knowledge is basic. A few questions:

    1. I'm just wondering if the reverse switch needs to be 15-20 Amp at 90VDC or not (depending on your motor size. My motor is 18A). And if so, where did you find one? A 90VDC switch with that amperage seems to be hard to find. That is leading me down the relay road, which I would like to avoid. I'm thinking that unless the motor gets stalled it's not likely to draw more than 1/2 it's rating and then only on startup.
    2. I see a lot of people use a 10k linear POT, but it seems the MC-60 normally has a 5k linear POT. Is there a reason for using a 10k POT?

    Thanks,
    Quiller
     
  5. hman

    hman Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Quiller -

    1. Most any switch rated at 20 (or better, 25) amps should work, especially if you don't switch it under load. Turn off the power, let the motor coast down, throw the switch, then turn power back on. CAUTION - Treadmill motors are optimized for rotation in one direction. The brushes are offset several degrees (I forget the typical amount) in one direction with respect to the field magnets. Yes, you can reverse one, but it will run slower in reverse.

    2. The value of the pot is not critical. The controller puts 12 volts across the outer terminals, and the wiper simply picks off the voltage at the set point. Both 5K and 10K will work fine. 10k are often easier to find. I'd not recommend going below 5k, as this might send too much current across the pot and shorten its life. By the way ... if you put a switch between the pot wiper and the MC-60, you can return to your previously set speed on startup without having to turn the pot all the way down. Opening the switch drops the "W" voltage to zero and deactivates the safety circuit that prevents a treadmill from starting up at speed.
     
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  6. QCaudill

    QCaudill United States Iron Registered Member

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    Thanks so much for the quick reply. 20 amp AC switches are plentiful, 20 amp DC switches, not so much. None the less, I think you are saying what was my gut feeling is, that the motor will really never be at the rated amps and as you say, the reverse switch would never be thrown with power going to the motor. The motor I have is actually Reversible, and on a wood lathe the only time you ever run the lathe in reverse is when sanding so not much power needed.

    I knew about adding the switch to the POT, but wasn't sure exactly where it went. Thanks for that information. I was thinking a small normally closed momentary switch would fit that role. Just push it before startup. It won't carry any current, to speak of, will it?

    Thanks again.
     
  7. Forty Niner

    Forty Niner United States Iron Registered Member

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    I use a treadmill motor on a small Taig metal lathe. The 5k POT works fine on mine.
    I would recommend that you include the choke coil on the DC circuit to smooth out the DC. It will run without out it but not as smooth.
    f.y.i. I have attached a diagram that may be some help.

    Other items I included on mine are a "jog" button and a "pause/run" switch as well as a reversing switch. The jog button can be used setting up. The pause/run switch allows the motor to be shut off then turned back on without moving the speed control knob.

    I really really like using the treadmill motor. It is smooth and powerful and runs a wide range of speeds. The one I have is 2.65HP, which is way more than the fractional hp motors normally used on small lathes. Never a problem cutting metal or wood.

    Good luck.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. QCaudill

    QCaudill United States Iron Registered Member

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    What exactly does the jog button do?
     
  9. FanMan

    FanMan Active User Active Member

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    I'm getting ready to do my own conversion, with the motor and MC-2100 controller I pulled from a treadmill. I've seen it mentioned in several places about the motor brushes being angled and causing issues (either lower speed or premature wear) when the motor is run in reverse. How much of an issue is this? "Forward" in my mill is the opposite of the motor's normal rotation in the treadmill.
     
  10. QCaudill

    QCaudill United States Iron Registered Member

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    There are quite a few new treadmill motors on eBay that are reversable in varing sizes. Used too but harder to determine if rated reversable.

    Sent from my SM-N920P using Tapatalk
     
  11. Forty Niner

    Forty Niner United States Iron Registered Member

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    The "Jog" button is wired in parallel with the "pause" switch.
    It is a spring loaded normally open momentary switch.
    When the "pause" switch has the power cut to the wiper connection on the potentiometer, the "jog" button can be pressed to momentary send power to the motor. This can allow you to move the item in the chuck a bit to check alignment, etc...
     
  12. Forty Niner

    Forty Niner United States Iron Registered Member

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    My treadmill motor powers my small lathe and runs happily in either direction. I don't even know which way it is "supposed" to run. I got the motor "bare." The direction that I normally use was determined solely by where I physically located the motor on my base.

    However I must disclose that my treadmill motor HP (2.65) is way more than what the lathe requires! Maybe that is why it doesn't matter which way mine runs.
     
  13. QCaudill

    QCaudill United States Iron Registered Member

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    Thanks,
    Quiller
     
  14. FanMan

    FanMan Active User Active Member

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    Same here, my mill currently has a 1HP AC motor.
     
  15. QCaudill

    QCaudill United States Iron Registered Member

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    A couple of fusing questions. What size should the fuse be between the reversing switch and the controller, and also the size of the fuse/circuit breaker after the main power switch.
    Thanks,
    Quiller
     
  16. FanMan

    FanMan Active User Active Member

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    I'm wiring mine with the original circuit breaker from the treadmill on the AC supply line to the controller... dunno the rating but the treadmill manufacturer presumably knew what they were doing. There was and is is no fuse between the controller and the motor.
     
  17. QCaudill

    QCaudill United States Iron Registered Member

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    My motor says it's 18 amps, I thought I would use a 15 amp circuit breaker on the AC supply line. It seems like that's what most treadmills have on them. I wanted to put a fuse or circuit-breaker between the reversing switch and the controller in case the motor ever got reversed without coming to a stop first.

    Sent from my SM-N920P using Tapatalk
     
  18. QCaudill

    QCaudill United States Iron Registered Member

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    My motor says it's 18 amps, I thought I would use a 15 amp circuit breaker on the AC supply line. It seems like that's what most treadmills have on them. I wanted to put a fuse or circuit-breaker between the reversing switch and the controller in case the motor ever got reversed without coming to a stop first.

    Sent from my SM-N920P using Tapatalk
     
  19. QCaudill

    QCaudill United States Iron Registered Member

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    My motor says it's 18 amps, I thought I would use a 15 amp circuit breaker on the AC supply line. It seems like that's what most treadmills have on them. I wanted to put a fuse or circuit-breaker between the reversing switch and the controller in case the motor ever got reversed without coming to a stop first.

    Sent from my SM-N920P using Tapatalk
     
  20. FanMan

    FanMan Active User Active Member

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    Good point.

    Mine doesn't list the amperage explicitly, but the nameplate says 2.60HP cont. duty @ 110VDC/1940 watts, which is 17.6A... but it also says 2.80HP "treadmill duty" (which is apparently some arbitrary number somewhere between the continuous and peak duty ratings) @ 130VDC. 17.6*2.8/2.6=18.99, so a 20A fast blowing fuse ought to do it. Or maybe a 15 to be safe, and have a 20A on hand in case the 15 doesn't do it.

    Though I will have the reversing switch on the box holding the controller on the back of the machine where I can't reach it easily, far away from the other controls.
     
  21. QCaudill

    QCaudill United States Iron Registered Member

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    Sounds right, but I'm still wonering what the proper value would be for a fuse between the reversing switch and the controller.

    Sent from my SM-N920P using Tapatalk
     
  22. FanMan

    FanMan Active User Active Member

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    That's what I was talking about, could need as much as 20A... but no harm starting smaller, then upping the size if it blows during normal use. The real question is what can the board take?
     
  23. QCaudill

    QCaudill United States Iron Registered Member

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    Yes that is exactly the question what can the board take, not what it can put out. The only time the board would get any current back to it is if the motor was reversed without coming to a stop first. I can't believe that it could withstand anything near 15 or 20 amps. Maybe I'm not thinking right?

    Sent from my SM-N920P using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017

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