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Which metal?

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Hukshawn

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#1
I need to make a few R8 arbors for some various tooling. What's a reasonable steel to use? I'm gonna order something up from the supplier. I will not harden as I cannot grind.
 

Hukshawn

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#2
I have carbide tools but not carbide drills.
 

Asm109

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#3
Either Stressproof or Pre hardened 4140. Stressproof machines nicely and does not distort during machining.

The other is a bit harder so your tools will be a bit more durable. It can still be machined with HSS, just turn the rpm down.
 

Hukshawn

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#4
My supplier has 1144 stressproof. A worthy metal for arbors?
 

Chipper5783

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#6
Sure, the 1144 would likely work fine. In fact, most anything that cuts okay with a file (or hacksaw) would also be fine. It depends a little on what you are actually making (are you hanging a large boring head off that R8 or just a dedicated holder for 1/4" end mills). As a very simple approach, avoid metals that are non-magnetic and don't cause a file or hacksaw to skate. Other than that, don't sweat it - just start cutting. The piece of metal that you put your time into will be totally "worthy". You can buy that piece of 1144, but it won't work any better than any other piece of metal.

The quality of the arbor will be about 95% based on the competency of the person making it - buying some special piece of metal won't make the arbor better.
 

Hukshawn

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#7
Sure, the 1144 would likely work fine. In fact, most anything that cuts okay with a file (or hacksaw) would also be fine. It depends a little on what you are actually making (are you hanging a large boring head off that R8 or just a dedicated holder for 1/4" end mills). As a very simple approach, avoid metals that are non-magnetic and don't cause a file or hacksaw to skate. Other than that, don't sweat it - just start cutting. The piece of metal that you put your time into will be totally "worthy". You can buy that piece of 1144, but it won't work any better than any other piece of metal.

The quality of the arbor will be about 95% based on the competency of the person making it - buying some special piece of metal won't make the arbor better.
That's fair. I can appreciate that. In the end, I'd rather not spend money on metal if I mess it all up. I can just buy r8 arbors for the various things I want to dedicate arbors for, but every time I need something, I want to make it. Not only do I wind up with more pride in it, but more experience and the experience is worth it.

The question over which metal was merely if I should stay away from something that will give me a hard time in the long run. Whether a mild steel of some kind will wear out or warp.

The largest tool I will be putting on is a 4 tooth 2" carbide face mill. I got it in the mail today, actually. Which was what sparked this discussion.
 

Hukshawn

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#8
Can I happily drill this 1144 with hss drills?
 

T Bredehoft

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#9
I've no experience with Stressprooff, but do with Pre hardened 4140. While it is RC 25 or so, it will work with HSS, I've made several tooling pieces from it and recommend it for use in tooling, ie., R8 tool holders. Just take your time with it.
 

chips&more

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#10
I use 1144 all the time, very easy to machine. But, I must the question and I totally understand the pride in making…but. When you look at the cost of material, maching and time verses buying the arbor(s) IMHO it’s a no brainer, I would buy the arbors. R8 arbors are soooo plentiful and cheap, even good named ones. Even easy to re-sell where as home made not so…Dave
 

Hukshawn

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#11
For a seasoned machinist, no, it doesn't make sense to make. Just buy them. But i relish every opportunity to make something. This is a hobby for me, I do not make money or do jobs, so my time is essentially worthless. I'm a carpenter by trade, so, my life is making things. But day job, if it saves time, buy it, even if it's more expensive. Time is everything. Hobby, I'll make it because I enjoy the experience. And with each item I make, I get a bit better and more seasoned.
 

Silverbullet

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#13
And besides, if I didn't make my own tooling, I would have nothing to machine at all. I basically make tooling to make more tooling.
Learning all the time , it's the way I was taught in vocational school . I made all the tools I could over the three years in the machine tool & die shop. First year as freshman we had 6 different areas of different trades . Every shop teacher I had invited me to take his area of expertise , it was a toss up for me I liked machine shop best , because without us there is no industry. We had everything in our shop , grinding room, heat treatment room , stock and tool room, and a shop full of all kinds of machines . I still have all the tools I built even the projects done as freshman. We started with a file and block of steal that needed to be square within +- 001 . That's all surfaces on each corner centers and edges. I wouldn't have ever changed from my choices. By the time I was out and three years apprenticeship in different shops night school for drafting and mechanical drawing and metallurgy. I was making more that year then my father had after working for the state for twenty years.
In my opinion son your earning your machinist tool & die tech title. I know now it's ok to be a machinist by learning CNC and time spent setting parts and pushing buttons it's ok I guess but my old school way is best in MY OPINION . Not saying anything against it at all. It's a good job to have pretty easy and repetitive I understand.
 
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