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Which buck chuck to buy?

ome

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#1
Please advise on which model would serve me well. I have a 11 inch logan lathe which is 40 inches or a bit more between the centers.
I also have a grizzly g 0755 mill/drill machine with 17 inches of Z.
I would probably lean towards a 6 or 8 inch as opposed to a ten inch.
I am a novice learning about all the machines in our basement workshop.
I have a 8 inch yuasa 550-048 that has a morse taper #3, and would be cool to be able to get a low profile 3 or 6 jaw buck chuck to fit that taper. The mill has r-8 taper.
I will be learning thru Various projects, and need to get all the accessories and tooling neede for a good education.
Always helpful when i post , thank you
thanks to all of you, in advance.

Jon
 

Chuck K

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#2
Jon, You don't want a 10" chuck on your 11" lathe. The 8" will be more than enough. With a 10" you have a clearance problem when you open the jaws. The 6" would probably be the handiest. Just my preference. It depends on what your going to turn.

Chuck
 

fastback

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#3
Normally, you would look for a chuck at half the diameter of the swing. I have a SB Heavy 10 and I use a 6-inch, 3 and 4 jaw. So far no problems with the size. I do have a 5-inch Bison if I need smaller.

So what I am saying is an 11-inch lathe would do well with a 6 inch chuck. You also want to be careful of the weight you are hanging on you spindle. Large chucks can get very heavy for a smaller lathe.
 
Last edited:

Ray C

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#4
As suggested, there is latitude here and a 6 or 8 will work. I vote for a 6" with reversable jaws of some sort. With an 8", it will fit but, if you chuck-up a piece big enough to need an 8", chances are, the crossfeed and compound won't have enough travel to work effectively on the part (if it can reach it at all).


Ray
 

TomS

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#5
I agree with Chuck, fastback and Ray. A 6" or 8" is the way to go and given my choice would lean toward the 6". I have a 12 x 36 and put a 8" Gator 4-jaw on it. It works great but a bit of overkill. Not to mention that it weighs a bunch and won't be long before I'll need a jib crane to lift it on and off.
 

Ray C

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#6
Man, am I glad you said what I forgot to say... I'm no weakling by any stretch but, I do have a wrist injury and many busted-up fingers and knuckles... Getting that 8" on/off is not my favorite chore and it borders on me deciding to make a cradle or sling to assist getting it on/off.

Aside from that, most of my work is done on a well tuned and behaved 6", 3J followed by collets and a dog between centers. -Nothing against 4Js at all and couldn't survive w/o them but, it's not needed for most things. I'm seriously considering getting a couple more chucks and they will be 6" in 4J and another 3J. I already have two 6" 3J. Sometimes I setup a part and need to swtich jobs so, I just remove the whole chuck -and that doesn't upset the workpiece.


Ray


I agree with Chuck, fastback and Ray. A 6" or 8" is the way to go and given my choice would lean toward the 6". I have a 12 x 36 and put a 8" Gator 4-jaw on it. It works great but a bit of overkill. Not to mention that it weighs a bunch and won't be long before I'll need a jib crane to lift it on and off.
 

ome

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#7
Man, am I glad you said what I forgot to say... I'm no weakling by any stretch but, I do have a wrist injury and many busted-up fingers and knuckles... Getting that 8" on/off is not my favorite chore and it borders on me deciding to make a cradle or sling to assist getting it on/off.

Aside from that, most of my work is done on a well tuned and behaved 6", 3J followed by collets and a dog between centers. -Nothing against 4Js at all and couldn't survive w/o them but, it's not needed for most things. I'm seriously considering getting a couple more chucks and they will be 6" in 4J and another 3J. I already have two 6" 3J. Sometimes I setup a part and need to swtich jobs so, I just remove the whole chuck -and that doesn't upset the workpiece.


Ray
Thank you all for your advice. You have made this purchase so much easier.
The 6 inch 3 or 6 jaw with reversible jaws.
Enco is a bit cheaper than grizzly for the same Buck chuck. I did not know about the backing plate, until i saw the prices. The backing plates range from 505. To 720. And the 3 jaw with reverseable top jaw range from 820. To 432.
I am not sure of the spindle nose size and thread, 2-8tpi? For 11" logan lathe

thanks again to all
jon
 

Tom Griffin

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#9
Thank you all for your advice. You have made this purchase so much easier.
The 6 inch 3 or 6 jaw with reversible jaws.
Enco is a bit cheaper than grizzly for the same Buck chuck. I did not know about the backing plate, until i saw the prices. The backing plates range from 505. To 720. And the 3 jaw with reverseable top jaw range from 820. To 432.
I am not sure of the spindle nose size and thread, 2-8tpi? For 11" logan lathe

thanks again to all
jon
I was wondering if you actually meant "Buck" chuck. My 6" six jaw Buck chuck was $1400 for the chuck alone. They are nice, but don't provide much "bang for the buck" for the hobbyist.

Tom
 
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