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What Type of Machining Experience and Interest Do We Have On This Site?

Discussion in '++ Q & A THREADS OF INTEREST ++' started by Management, Jan 22, 2013.

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What Types of Machining Interest and Experience Do We Have on This Site? (Select as many as apply.)

  1. Hobby use for general fabrication & repair

    292 vote(s)
    84.1%
  2. Business Shop owner

    36 vote(s)
    10.4%
  3. Professional Machinist

    63 vote(s)
    18.2%
  4. Tool ownership ie Lathe & mill

    269 vote(s)
    77.5%
  5. Level of experience: Experienced

    92 vote(s)
    26.5%
  6. Level of experience: Newbie

    104 vote(s)
    30.0%
  7. Level of experience: Moderate

    138 vote(s)
    39.8%
  8. CNC experience

    66 vote(s)
    19.0%
  9. Formal education from a tech school

    89 vote(s)
    25.6%
  10. Formal training in Machining

    77 vote(s)
    22.2%
  11. Other: Specify Below

    50 vote(s)
    14.4%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Management

    Management United States Administrator Staff Member Administrator

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    Would a general member profile ID help for new members and lurkers? I mean a thread based on general member polling for what type of interest and level of experience is on-line.

    ie:
    Hobby use for general fabrication & repair
    Business Shop owner
    Professional Machinist
    Level of experience
    Level of formal training
    Level of formal education from a tech school
    CNC experience
    Tool ownership ie Lathe & mill
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 18, 2013
  2. upTheHill

    upTheHill Active User Active Member

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    City:
    Washington
    State:
    Maine

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    my father and grandfather were machinists, and i grew up with a lathe in the basement.
    my father taught me how to use the lathe, and to silver solder metal, among other things including a love of guns.
    the USAF taught me the rest.

    I'm now starting career #3 as a gunsmith, and building up my own shop now with
    grizzly g0602 lathe
    HF 44991 mill/drill with DRO
    a couple of 6" bench grinders
    4*36 belt sander
    4*6 HF bandsaw
    bead blast cabinet, a paint booth, and numerous small tools I've had in storage from the father.
     
  3. David S

    David S Canada Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Location:
    Brockville, Ontario
    City:
    Brockville
    State:
    Ontario

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    I am a retired electronic engineer, but I have always been a closet mechanical guy. I started machining as a hobby when I used to restore american made small gas engines. My first lathe was a Unimat which I have a number of accessories for. I did lot's of machining on that little lathe until I picked up an Atlas 618 from a retired machinist whom only used if for building a scale model steam locomotive engine. Over the years I machined all sorts of small parts for various things, and then began getting interested in old clock repair. Since retirement a little over a year ago I have taken up repairing old clocks full time for customers. I would rather make replacement parts rather than buy them in order to hone my skills in case I get a clock for which there are no readilly available parts.

    I know it is not the greatest thing, but I will confess that I have a very good robust drill press with less than 0.001" runout measured with a rod in the chuck. I have an x-y table on the press and use it for lite milling of small parts mainly in brass and aluminum.

    In the future I would like to get a proper small mill, probably a Sherline. My shop is quite small so I don't have space for larger equipment.

    So I guess that is my story.

    David
     
  4. roygpa

    roygpa United States Active User Active Member

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    City:
    McMurray
    State:
    Pennsylvania

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    No experience other than working as a swarf rat in a machine shop 30 years ago. That was my job to clean swarf up around the machines and throw it in a dumpster. I hadn't heard the term for that job until recently. I also got to thread hold down bolts, cut thousands of keys and even filled the oil reservoir on a boring mill after forgetting to put the plug back in. I should have been fired for that, but wasn't.

    Roy
     
  5. Ray C

    Ray C United States Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    City:
    Crofton
    State:
    Maryland

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    No formal training but was taught by my father (Tool & Die Maker) and Uncles (one a Metallurgist and the other a general Machinist) from the time I was old enough to reach the controls on the machines. Worked 4 years as a dealer auto-mechanic (among other jobs including carpentry and construction) through college and have an additional 8 years of college education in various technical/math fields.

    Self taught in welding (mostly TIG and stick) and got some help from a friend whose a certified welder.

    Love being a shop dweller and making things after taking the monkey suit off when the day job is done. Been doing that for as long as I can remember. Hope to retire from the corporate world one day and continue doing shop stuff.
     
  6. GaryK

    GaryK In Memory Rest In Peace

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    City:
    Tyler
    State:
    Texas

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    Same as Ray. I was taught by my father. He owned a machine shop that I worked in while going to school. After he died I ran it for a couple of years while training by
    brother to take it over. I spent the next 20 years as an engineer designing the machines that build the things that you use every day from Hot Pockets to F-35 fighters.

    My father worked in the space program and even got an award from NASA for helping put the first man on the moon.
    My grandfather used to work for Pratt & Whitney making wood propellers during WWI, and was a machinist also.
     
  7. Richard King

    Richard King Active Member Active Member

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    I also learned my trade from my Dad who was a Journeyman Machinist for Cat in Peoria IL before WW2 and was recruited to come to MN during the war to run a lathe at Northern Pump a huge plant up here the Navy took control of and they made 12" guns and bomb sites. When he arrived they didn't need lathe operators, but they needed Maintenance Men, so he Apprenticed under a German Immigrent who taught him to hand scrape.

    He also thought of a device to help in testing parallelism of ways and after the war he patented it. It was and is called the King-Way Alignment Gauge. When I was a 10 or 12 he would bring home Myford OD Grinder tables or Boyer Shultz table to scrape at night in our basement and my brother Tom and I would watch and "help". Any of you Dad's know what I mean, but he was patient and we began to learn, during my summer vacations we would work with him rebuilding machines. I remember working at medical device plants scraping Myfords in my teens and Onans when I was in my late teens. This was before the Biax Power Scraper was invented and we would scrape by hand or use a Anderson Power Scraper (shown in the Connelly book) (My Dad knew Connely as he was a Vo-Tech teacher in St. Paul).

    Over the years we would share shops with Millwrights so I worked with them and continued to rebuild and Apprentice under my Dad. In the spring of 1971 I was 20 and we had a huge fight and I drove up to Alaska with 2 friends (another story and adventure) while I was up there I got a letter from my Mom and she said that my Dad had got a big contract and if I could get home I could go with to Iran. I borrowed plane fare from a friend and flew home. Had to apply for a passport and make up with my Dad. So in July of 1971 my Dad and Millright named Don and I flew to Iran where we worked for 3 months installing a machines in a machining plant for BMY of York PA who had built Sherman tanks during WW2 and after the war had sold /given several hundred to Iran. The plant was to rebuild and modernize these tanks. It was an amazing experience and I had my 21st birthday in Masjid-i-Solimon Iran (MIS for short). When I returned home I went alone around the world and my Dad came back through Europe. Don Stayed and his family eventually moved there.

    After that I was working full time as a Machine Rebuilder at the used machinery company who had sold all the machine tools to BMY and had also liquidated a Boeing plant where most of these machine originated from. I spent several years working as a contractor at Midwestern Machinery in Mpls with my Dad and after he passed. The owner became like an uncle. Working there I got a heck of an education as one week I was scraping a Moore Jig Bore and the next a 600 ton punch press, or a G&L or Lucas Boring bar. I scraped and repaired just about any or all types of machines over the next 20 + years. We bought our first BIAX Scraper in 1972 and continued to make King-Ways. (You will occasionally see one with Sherr-Timico on the box, My Dad sold them a license to make them too as well as Do-All, both MN companies).

    We got an order from GM in Indianapolis in 1982 I think and they wanted someone to come and demo it, I flew down and did it. While in the plant I saw about 50 guys scraping by hand and off the cuff said "how come your not using Biax Power Scrapers?" They had no clue what they were....so I went back and for the next 2 years taught their men in that plant as well as in 2 other plant in Indy how to scrape with Biax. I came back and got my guys jobs working for Kurt Mfg (the vise company as I was a friend of Bill Kuban the son of the owner who my Dad knew), liquidated the shop machinery and started out on my own with my Dad's straight-edges and my Biax's teaching rebuilding and scraping. Since the 1980's I have taught well over 20,000 men and women all over the world how to rebuild / build / scrape ways. I have taught several hundred students and for dozens of new machine builders here in the states, Europe and mostly in Taiwan.

    I now work from my home in Cottage Grove MN and rebuild machines for old friends here in MN and continue to teach. Plus I have become addicted to the shop forums and was aching for a board like this one as the others were so unfriendly. I still write on the other boards because some of the people on there need to know the correct way, many of those guys on the other ones, figure they are experts after scraping 1 machine or some are all talk.

    I have never Met Nelson or Tony and some of the other Moderators, but they feel like family to me. Uncle Nelson, Little Brother Tony and cousin Ray.....lol...and all my "kids" who I teach. I had a man in Turkey tell me once after I taught him to scrape at "Spinner" a German new machine builder who opened a plant in Istanbul...This student, with tears in his eyes told me through an interpreter "I taught him like his Father did" Made me cry too...so I now call my students "my kids". :))
     
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  8. DaveD

    DaveD United States Active User Active Member

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    City:
    Raleigh
    State:
    North Carolina

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    My interests and experience are at opposite extremes. I'm a hobbiest, school of hard knocks guy. Self taught carpenter, hot rodder, off road rock crawler, welder, machinist. I typically learn by reading and then doing. I contribute where I can but typically don't participate unless I think my post is providing value. Most of what I do is repair something or make/modify something in support of my hobbies and lifestyle.

    I like to read about how 'the other half of the world lives' i can even learn something from posts about using portable boring bars boring out bushings on big earth movers or repairing and machining something the size of a refrigerator. Even reading about micro welding and machining can be interesting. Still don't have a clue how someone can use micro mills down to .001" without breaking them.:headscratch:

    So I see lots of value in diverse posts and sites. There is information on this site that I don't find elsewhere. Thats why I'm here and hopefully can contribute to help others.
     
  9. Syaminab

    Syaminab Active User Active Member

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    City:
    Monterrey

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    First Automotive Systems Technician, then Engineer in Mechanics and Electrics, paid my way through College learning and manufacturing plastic Injection molds on CNC equipment, ran very few conventional machines. Always had admiration for Airplanes, son of a Pilot I guess. Worked for 6 years after college procuring and designing molds and dies for GE. Then started my own machinning business in 2004, Working for CAT and many other companies, now have developed some experience in 5 axes machinning of impellers for Datum Compressors. Learning everyday. Among my Machines, DMG DMU 100 5 axes machine equiped with Renishaw probe, 18Krpm spindle, Tooling laser probe and so many features. Also a 6 axes double spindle Turning center with live tooling, equiped with Renishaw tooling setter. Also a Doosan 30X16X22" High speed Vertical Machining center. Also a Hardinge superprecision HLV lathe equipped to run as a milling machine. Also a very old Shop smith 5 in one machine, which converts to lathe, saw, bench drill, sander...I just love this old machine. have some experience with Universal Grinding Machines. I can program CNC proficiently up to 5 axes on Heidenhain and Fanuc. Yeap, all this in Monterrey, Mexico.

    I love this site, because I learn a lot, Since I entered, I have made a nice Vise, a Fly cutter and a Jewelery Ring. I`m now working on aluminum Anodyzing and will continue to share and learn in here.

    If anyone needs a cnc program, or I can be of help don`t hesitate to ask. I want to share, I have cnc programs for sitting round inserts and apkt inserts so you can make your own cutters.

    Regards.
     
  10. jduncan

    jduncan United States Active User Active Member

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    City:
    Odenville
    State:
    Alabama

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    I'm entirely self taught, using the internet and many books I've purchased to learn. I originally bought a Sherline lathe 7 years ago to make parts for a model I was building (Saturn V rocket replica) and after experimenting with it for a while, discovered that it wasn't really large enough to do the job. So I did the best I could. In 2007, I relocated the family to Alabama and the lathe stayed in storage until the middle of last year due to various life issues. I began to experiment and learn again and a Sherline mill joined the family (apparently I had forgotten that the Sherline was a tad small for my BIG aspirations).

    Las fall, I visited the home of a club member (military truck collectors) and he had a SB 9, along with a mess of other equipment packed into his garage. We talked about what he was able to do with it, which included making replica machine gun cooling shrouds for a Sherman tank he was fixing up for the city as a display. I was inspired! I began haunting Craigslist and when I found a lathe for sale, I researched the type and model.

    In October, a former tech school advertised some South Bend lathes for sale, including a 13" x 40. I called my buddy up and asked him "how would you like an all expense paid trip to Atlanta?".

    I wound up with that lathe and a Bridgeport mill. The ride back from Atlanta to Birmingham was a nervous one, with both of those heavy pieces of iron in my trailer.

    Since then I've got the lathe online and have been learning how to work a real lathe, as the Sherline was not really operated the same way. But it's been a blast. I've made tools for truck restoration and cleaned up v-grove pulleys among other stuff.

    I am doing more a more complex stuff on the lathe, when life stuff doesn't get in the way. Here lately it seems I mainly just go to the shop and admire it and don't even get to turn it on. I have searched for machinist courses along the lines of "continuing education" but down here in the South they aren't very common.

    But I have it and it's MINE! :lmao:
     
  11. OccupantRJ

    OccupantRJ United States Active Member Active Member

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    City:
    Goldsboro
    State:
    North Carolina

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    First of all, my job and my hobbies are mostly the same. I am an experienced millwright, fabricator, machinist, mechanic, and carpenter. The only things I have ever hired out are auto front end alignment, and body and paint, as I don't enjoy hand sanding. I do everything else from rebuild my automatic transmissions to building computers or kithen cabinets. In my job, I am the sole mechanical support for a small manufacturing company of heated handheld tools. I have to do mechanical repair, machining, tool and die, woodwork, prototype development, HVAC, electrical, and anything else to keep the place going. I have a part time helper for facilities maintenance. I am an old school machinist, no DRO, use lantern style toolposts and hand grind tool bits, but have exposure at work to CNC lathes and high speed CNC engravers in the production departments. I believe strongly in sharing knowledge and helping others to learn new things. My motto is " It's always easier to find a reason NOT to do something"
     
  12. terrywerm

    terrywerm New Member Liaison Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Location:
    Neither here nor there
    City:
    Jordan
    State:
    Minnesota

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    I had an interest in all phases of metal working when I was in high school. Back then I was able to learn welding and aluminum foundry work in "Hot Metals" and took one year of machine shop classes, plus a year of "Special Projects" which were a joint decision between the student and instructor. I learned how to use the lathe, vertical mill, horizontal mill, surface grinder, and shaper, in addition to learning how to make some simple patterns then ram them up and pour them. Right after high school I went to work in a local machine shop and spent my days drilling the same holes over and over and over (sound familiar anyone?). Since I had grown up on a farm I had some experience with driving trucks and I suddenly found myself in that role when the company's driver quit. That appealed to me more than drilling the same hole a thousand times per day, and I soon found myself moving on to bigger trucks, eventually becoming an owner/operator.

    During this time I built a number of different implements for a compact tractor that I had, including a two stage snow blower, from scratch. A friend of mine saw what I could do and invited me to apply to the maintenance department at a company where he worked. I applied, got the job, and did quite a bit of design and fabrication. They also had a full machine shop and the maintenance manager was an electrician who grew up in a machine shop that was owned by his family. I inquired about using the mill and lathe to make some parts for a project and he asked to see what I knew. He was impressed and asked where I went to school for machine shop. Of course I told him that my training was only in high school and some practical shop experience as a machine operator. He decided that I knew enough to be turned loose on the machines, and I found myself doing many of the machining projects there.

    Eventually that company sold out and everything was moved to Ohio. I worked in the maintenance department for a couple of companies since then but found myself back driving a truck to pay the bills, as I still am. Machining has become an enjoyable past time for me and my oldest son now wants to learn, as does his daughter. I guess I will have plenty to do in my free time!
     
    uncle harry likes this.
  13. jeffm

    jeffm Active Member Active Member

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    City:
    Richmond
    State:
    Missouri

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    Whooee. Boy am I a rookie.
    So far, up to an including today, I have about, oh I don't know, maybe six or eight hours running an old milling machine on Plexiglas (and that about 40 years ago) and no other machine tool experience whatsoever.
    I'm not able to work a job and have gotten curious about CNC machinery and 3D printing, closely related skills. I have a couple of Russian motorcycles and can see myself making custom parts for them, and pieces for my 27' sailboat. Mostly I am interested in the learning process itself, and I'm confident that after I obtain and learn to operate CNC machines I'll be able to figure out things to do with them. Motorcycle hobbyists never run out of goodies they'd like to have.
    At my current stage I am trying to learn how best to choose affordable machines, probably to convert to CNC.
    Jeff

    Jeff
    Vietnam vet - Patriot Guard rider
    sent from my Android phone
     
  14. Kevin45

    Kevin45 Active User Active Member

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    City:
    Urbana
    State:
    Ohio

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    I started in the trade as a Tool Designer fresh out of high school. I worked at an extrusion shop and also a shop that made automotive bearings for a few years doing tool design. I didn't like it, so I quit and took a job in a shop that made air moving equipment ie grain dryers, mainly large props running a radial drill press. I did that a few months before starting on lathes. I worked there for about a year and started at Rockwell in the Power Tool Division as a Setup Man and Group Leader. Two years into that job and I was laid off due to the shop closing. I was out of work for a few months until I started working for Grimes Manufacturing in the Model Shop making prototypes for aircraft lighting. After a couple of years in there, the department shut down and I again found myself in Tool Design. Man, I hated sitting behind a desk. About a year after the desk job, I ended up bidding on a job in the Tool Room where I worked until I had to take disability. I worked 30+ years for Grimes which eventually became Honeywell through a couple of purchases. At the very end, I was the lead Toolmaker in our department. Over the years, I have taught quite a few to learn CNC and also machining and designing. I miss working there as it was an exciting job with something different every day. When the lead Die man retired, I had to take over his position building and repairing dies, which eventually led to having to retire on disability. Ten shoulder surgeries total with five total replacements, four revisions, and a scraping, left me with an arm that I cannot use today and in constant pain. But upon retiring, I did manage to purchase a Lagun manual mill and a new JET 14" x 40" lathe. It gives me something to do to pass the time when I feel like I can stand running them. At least I can get a few hours of machine time once in a while to keep the cobwebs out of the brain.
     
  15. burnrider

    burnrider United States Active User Active Member

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    City:
    Oregon City
    State:
    Oregon

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    Hobby shop - mostly dirt bikes & general auto maintenance

    Most impressive poll categories are hobby shop guys and tool ownership. Lots of us taking advantage of affordable or used tooling.

    Even though it's not polled, there are some savy daughters, growing up under Dad's training. If we have women in the armed forces, fire /police, riding street or dirt bikes, they're in the shop as well.

    Welcome, even if you continue to lurk:))
     
  16. Mylo

    Mylo Iron Registered Member

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    City:
    Broadview
    State:
    Saskatchewan

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    I have no experience or training whatsoever in machining, never made so much as a 'chip', but I have always had a fascination and respect for anyone who could make their own parts out of metal. I wanted to be one of those people so here I am. I am not afraid to try and fail....in the name of learning experience. I love machine shops and machine tools.

    I am building a kit helicopter and wanted to make custom parts for it, asthetic, or otherwise non crucial to flight pieces. I bought a lathe (14"x40"), mill, press, and assortment of other machining tools, odd's 'n' ends, probably 100 pieces, all together as a package from an elderly gent who could no longer physically use them. ....I still feel guilty for the price I paid for everything, but he wouldn't take a penny more, happy that everything went together to a good home.

    The helicopter project starts this Fall. In the meantime, I plan on learning, firing up the machine tools, and practice making......punches, or something similar.

    Mylo
     
  17. Syaminab

    Syaminab Active User Active Member

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    City:
    Monterrey

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    I myself have a passion for aircraft and work in Mexican Aerospace Components machinning from molds, dies, hydroforming dies for aircraft structures, turbo compressors and so on. If I can be of help once you get to the tough materials will be glad to help.
    regards
     
  18. jeffm

    jeffm Active Member Active Member

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    City:
    Richmond
    State:
    Missouri

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    Makes me feel a little better knowing there's at least one more rank beginner besides me!
    Jeff
     
  19. colintarry

    colintarry Iron Registered Member

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    City:
    munich
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    I was apprenticed as a fitter/turner, trained on millingmachine, lathe turning, shaping machine, tool grinding, hand scraping, sheet metal work, welding (gas & electric arc), basic hacksaw and file handwork to 1/2 thou accuracy (that was 9 months of torture). It was a good grounding.

    a long time since I worked these tools and methods, sine bars, tool makers buttons etc. I guess it may take some refresher training to bring it all back.

    I'm learing/reading about CNC control drivers and programming, I want to make a cnc router/mill that has reasonable tolerance parts, not just an MDF or plywood based model.

    interested to learn more as I go along and share my knowledge and experiences.

    regards

    Colin
     
  20. burnrider

    burnrider United States Active User Active Member

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    City:
    Oregon City
    State:
    Oregon

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    Was this in the 40's or 50's?

    I know a life long machinist who trained first with file skill.
     
  21. colintarry

    colintarry Iron Registered Member

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    I was trained in 1970 and spent nine months standing in in front of a metal bench with a hacksaw and file and a metal vice for making test pieces, learning how to file metal to a fine art and what is known as draw filing was not allowed! It taught me discipline and to take my time to try and get it right first time!

    It stood me in good stead, later, when I joined the air force there was some more basic training for a couple of weeks using a file and a hacksaw again. I took my eye of the ball when measuring a test piece we had 30 hours to make. Complacency had kicked in, I had about 5 hours left of my allocated time and cut the piece short, so I had to start again. All the lads laughed co's they knew my history and suspected I'd blown it!

    My Dockyard training helped starting afresh I finished the job just in time and still got a 98% score for my work! I had the last laugh. All thanks to my trainer in the Dockyard a Mr Urry who I gues will have passed on to greater heights now! Boy was he tough! His favourite line to us young ones was "I'm a bastard! and I've got the papars to prove it!@ we all thought it must be true! He was hard but fair! He was my mentor and will always have my respect!

    I hope you like this bit of my history.

    kind regards colin
     
  22. Ozwelder

    Ozwelder Australia Active User Active Member

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    Location:
    Mackay, Queensland, Australia
    City:
    Mackay
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

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    Hi,
    Since about 1993, when I took a night course in basic machining and have lusted for a lathe until I got one in 2007.
    My background is one a Metal fabricator, high pressure vessel coded welder and instructor .
    I enjoying making and fixing things . My interests are all of the place ranging from knife making to muzzle loading and a few places in between. I have taught in the high school system for a decade or so but recently pulled the pin on that due to attitude problems

    I have the lathe and am looking for a reasonable priced mill with a view to generating a little earning capacity when I retire.
    My goal is to to have the tools and machines for a light engineering shop.Light engineering meaning,if you can carry in in, I might be able to work on it for you.
    My machining experience is limited to turning,facing,parting off, taper cutting, and tapping external and internal static threads. I'm not far of cutting my first single point thread

    I live in city that is supported by the coal and sugar industries and for the average bloke getting work of this nature performed is too small potatoes for the engineering businesses and they won't do work at a reasonable rate. my goal is to fill that niche.
    Ok thats me in a nutshell

    Oz
     
  23. danbetta

    danbetta Iron Registered Member

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    City:
    Sag Harbor, NY
    State:
    New York

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    Spent a little over year and half working for a brilliant machinist/designer (Stever McMahon at Creative Metal Works in Bridgehampton, NY) totally under his direction. Worked a Bridgeport a lot and a lathe of can't-remember-brand (recollection says it was a Colchester). As it was an architectural metal fabrication shop, spent a lot of hours w/ belt sanders putting "brushed" finish on various projects.

    This was a very cool project. For Mel Brooks' Broadway play, "The Producers", we had to make a few dozen armatures that would be the backbone of mannequins dressed as Nazi soldiers. The armature would be wheeled around by a live actor and had handles so the actor could articulate the dummies.

    We made the prototype, got approved, and had to make 27 of them (54 bodies in total). For that, I took the designer's drawing and input the torso/shoulder/leg pieces into the computer via AutoCad. Sent them out for laser cutting. The rest was entirely fabricated by us.
    Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.39.18 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.39.32 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.40.01 PM.png

    This is more the kind of projects Steve would get. Finished metal work for fancy houses in the Hamptons. This set was all for the same client made out of bronze. All machined down to .001. Round table folded down to make smaller square. Large dining table was a bit difficult to engineer as the square bronze hollow tube had to be supported at each intersection. For that we made inserts that were machine screwed together, inserted in 3 axes, and then low temperature soldered (that was an experiment as the high temperature solder melted the bronze). To finish, the bronze was darkened and waxed.

    Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.40.27 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.40.53 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.41.01 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.41.13 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.41.20 PM.png

    We did lots of stair railings; this one for a very modern house on the beach. All brushed stainless steel (LOTS of brushing!) Again, all machined to very tight tolerance. All welds ground down, discoloration removed via electrolysis/acid, and brushed finish re-applied at every weld by hand - by me and a buddy! Work done in the dead of winter...not so bad buy we had 200' of railing to install around the pool deck and over the dune down to the beach.

    Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.42.22 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.42.27 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.42.35 PM.png

    Another stair railing. Cold rolled steel, darkened, waxed.

    Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.41.57 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.42.03 PM.png

    A ceiling installation for the sales office of a condo in NYC. Architect wanted a textural, 3D effect. Can't see it so well in these photos, but the stainless steel mesh is of 3 sizes (sourced from England used to sift/separate gravel) and hung at 3 different levels overlapping (we used a water level to install which was so cool in its simplicity/effectiveness). They loved the result so much they used the treatment throughout the lobby of the condo (I had left by then).

    Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.42.54 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.43.00 PM.png

    Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.39.18 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.39.32 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.40.01 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.40.27 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.40.53 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.41.01 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.41.13 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.41.20 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.42.22 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.42.27 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.42.35 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.41.57 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.42.03 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.42.54 PM.png Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 4.43.00 PM.png
     
  24. jmarkwolf

    jmarkwolf Canada Active User Active Member

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    Location:
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    City:
    Pinckney
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    Michigan

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    Hi Mylo

    Which heli kit are you building?

    I "re-launched" my interest in machining while building my Rotorway 162F Exec about 15 years ago.
     
  25. jmarkwolf

    jmarkwolf Canada Active User Active Member

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    I have no formal training in machining, just what I picked up from my dad, who owned a machine shop for many years before and after World War II. Our basement and garage was pretty well stocked with tools while growing up. He liked Delta Rockwell and Delta Milwaukee tools, my eye is still drawn to them.

    I inherited most of his tools and still have them. Wish I could've kept his welders.

    Took 4 years of high school shop (if I remember those years correctly).

    Got a degree in Electrical Engineering and have been designing small computers for the automotive and other industries for close to 25 years.

    I re-launched my interest in machining while building my Rotorway 162F Exec helicopter kit in 1998. I bought an RF-31 clone mill/drill, mainly just for locating drilled holes accurately, and a 11" x 26" Grizzly lathe, and much of the attendant accessories and related tooling.

    Still fly my helicopter every weekend in the summer months.

    I have recently purchased a 1967 Series 1 Bridgeport which I am now whipping back into shape. Will be transplanting the DRO from the mill/drill, or installing a new one.

    Have been bitten hard by the machinery bug this time around. Watch Craigslist frequently for "gems". Have outgrown my corner in the basement, can't get the Bridgeport down there anyways. Will have to build a shop!
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2013
  26. 24more

    24more United States Active User Active Member

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    Minnesota

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    All I have is a Waterjet at work. I am not a machinist. None of our senior people wanted to take the time or effort to learn how to use it. Another bottom feeder and I took it upon ourselves to learn some 2d cad and start making parts. Shortly after we figured it out everyone was whining we were running it, so they filed a grievance with the union. Union and company to them to quit whining. We have had it 2 years now and it is still the other guy and me running it.

    I am in the process of building a cnc router and have ordered a x2 mini mill. Just waiting on the ups man.

    Grandfather was a master machinist, brother and cousin are cnc machinist. I will most likely to a machinist spot at work, all manual machines. About a dozen lathes and half dozen mills.
     
  27. Chester

    Chester Active User Active Member

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    Hi, I was a Chem. Tech. in a chemical co. For 37 years, after retiring I was giving the chance to go to school for retraining. There was a limited choice of classes I could pick from, most where health care class. One was machine and tool making, the one I picked. It was a one year and all day, wasn't sure I could do this at 65 of age. The school was a Vo-Tect, and all High School students, then I really wasn't sure if I could do that. The teacher had a machine shop for 20+ years, a great person to learn from. The students, well, some wanted to be there, most didn't. I finished school this January 17, learn good amount about machining and today kids. In the end it was a great period of my life. I have now purchase a atlas and south Bend lathe, which I have just got going, thank to some people here. I also got a Ro Fung bench top mill, maybe a mistake, time will tell. You can say that I have replaced my treacher with all of you people on this forum. My computer skill are not in posting picture as of yet, I have some of things I have made and want to post, a hammer with interchangeable brass, aluminum and plastic heads also a boring tool with a quick change post and ball maker on quick change post, plus parts for my lathes. My next project is a theading dail fo SB. I am also a proud ex Marine and Vietnam-Nam vet, a hugh Pittsburgh Steelers fan and somehow been married for 38 years with two grown children. Thanks for viewing, Chester from Ambridge, Pa.
     
  28. puzzler_ken

    puzzler_ken United States Steel Registered Member

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    I got into machining as an adjunct to my woodworking. I design and make secret boxes (a secret box is one that you cannot open
    unless you know the secret). I found that some of the mechanisms in the box designs required fairly precise machining work.
    I also enjoy precision machining just for the fun of it.

    When I bought my first lathe (Jet 9x20) I was afraid that I would use it to kill (or greatly injure) myself so I signed up for the
    2 year Precision Machining program at Lake Washington Technical College (Seattle area, East side). I enjoyed it greatly.
    For any of you that are located close-by, check it out.

    puzzler_ken
     
  29. loggerhogger

    loggerhogger United States Active User Active Member

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    I got introduced to machining by volunteering at the Mt. Rainier Scenic Railroad. They restore and maintain several steam locomotives that were used in the logging industry. My first real engine build from castings was Cole's popcorn wagon engine.
     
  30. steamcar

    steamcar Iron Registered Member

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    I do not have any formal training along the lines of a trade certificate or such like yet I did work in the trade as a professional model maker for some years.
    One of my closest friends is fully qualified as a toolie and it is often very noticeable how differently we approach projects we tackle together.

    When it comes to making gears or other highly complex items with detailed drawings there is no doubt he leaves me in the dust but when something has to be made where drawings don't exist then I find I have the edge as in my time on the bench drawings were seldom seen.

    We often have long discussions about how to proceed and more than once he has threatened to buy me a blue and white striped apron but I like to think that together we can do almost anything.

    A lot of the stuff I do requires an imaginative approach and many of the ways I find to use my lathe or mill just are not in the text books.
    Sometimes I think it would be nice to have been trained in the "proper" way to do things but in some other ways I think this can stifle your creativity a bit.
    As long as you treat you machines with respect and take care of them properly it shouldn't matter how you use them.

    It's the end result that counts.
     

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