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What paint do you use to sustain coolant on your machine?

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CNC Dude

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#1
Hi group,

It has been a while since I frequent any machine forum. Was in machining jail/hell (e.g. living in an apartment with all my goodies stored...). But I am finally coming back into the life!

Since I am about to reassemble my CNC shop, I thought of repainting the base which as you can see here, has seen way better days. Because of the coolant, the original paint job in in essence laughing at me.

Have already scrapped it all, but instead of just using conventional paint (which we all know will result in the exact same crap), what do you recommend? What have you used before which I can give a try? Preferably something I can find locally. Thanks for your input!
 

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4gsr

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#3
I know where Little Elm, Texas is at!

Welcome back!

Stay a while!
 

CNC Dude

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#4
I know where Little Elm, Texas is at!

Welcome back!

Stay a while!
Hey, thanks for bringing up my Little Elmishness... As it turns out, I no longer live there (which is why I was living in an apartment for almost a year). Sold our house, stayed in an apartment and finally found a place where someday might be able to build a decent workshop. Anyway, I am in Melissa (very close to Little Elm, anyway). I plan on visiting this forum more often, that is for sure!
 

4gsr

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#5
I think the paint system that brino suggested would be a good one.

Any of the paint systems out there require a respirator would be a good choice, too!

I like my Rustoleum "Smoke Gray" paint, but it is not coolant resistance at all!
 

dlane

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#6
Should be able to get real paint in Texas, kinda wish I never left.
 

RJSakowski

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#7
I have found urethane paint to be extremely resistant to solvents. We used a spray urethane on an anodized lab robot deck to protect it from solvents and tried to strip the coating prior to stripping the anodizing, the only way that I could remove it was by scraping with a razor blade. Acetone, lacquer thinner, mineral spirits, and methylene chloride paint stripper wouldn't touch it.

Two part epoxy, the brush on type, should be fairly resistant to coolant as well.
 

Laytonnz

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#8
High build zinc epoxy primer then a 2 pack epoxy top coat should be bullet proof... dulux durebuild ste Is a good product

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk
 

Laytonnz

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#9
High build zinc epoxy primer then a 2 pack epoxy top coat should be bullet proof... dulux durebuild ste Is a good product

International, interthane 990 is a very good product aswell, paired up with one of there steel primers

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk
 

Silverbullet

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#10
I don't know if it would do , but how about the rubberized paint they use as bed liner in truck bodies. It's tuff as iron and takes abuse.
 

aliva

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#11
Keep in mind the chemical composition of your coolant. If the coolant contains any component that is in the paint it's likely to attack it.
Old saying," Like dissolves Like ". I used to use Castrol Syntilo in my lathe mainly because it was clear and easy to see the work, but it ate the paint, I have since switched back to water soluble oil
 

cjtoombs

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#12
I used an epoxy primer and a catalyzed automotive grade acrylic enamel topcoat. to repaint my mill base. Haven't tried coolant in it yet, so can't say how it holds up yet, but I have high hopes for it. If I think of it, I will update this in a year or so. I expect that any paint that is not catalyzed will be attacked. I like this paint combination for machinery because I like to use brake cleaner (spray acetone) for cleaning things up, it these won't dissolve in acetone.
 

projectnut

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#13
I have never tried it, but I wonder how POR-15 would stand-up in real tough chemical environments.

They even have kits for fuel tanks:
http://www.por15.com/Fuel-System-Restoration_c_17.html
http://www.por15.com/POR-15-Motorcycle-Fuel-Tank-Strip-Repair-Kit_p_60.html

-brino
I would concur with Brino's suggestion. I am currently painting the propane tank for our RV with POR 15. It's great stuff and can really take a beating. I'm using the silver since tit's supposed to have the highest metal content. The higher metal content is recommended when the metal has some pitting. This is the second propane tank I've painted with the stuff. The first one was on our 2001 motorhome. I painted it in 2007 when the motorhome had about 50,000 miles on the odometer. It still looked like new when we traded it off in 2013 with over 100,000 miles on the odometer.

I just applied the second coat this afternoon. I'll let it cure a couple days then sand it and put a cover coat of machinery grey over the whole thing. I bought a quart from the local body shop supply house. It also comes in pints. It's not cheap at about $35.00 for a pint and $50.00 for a quart. It's far and away the best paint I've ever used. I'll have some left over from this job. I'll use it on a couple pieces of landscaping equipment, and possibly some machine tool parts.. I'd love to use it on my milling machine, but it's some nasty smelling stuff, and I don't want it in the house until it's cured.
 

cjtoombs

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#14
With POR-15, just remember it is not UV stable, so if your machine happens to sit somewhere in the shop where it can get sunlight, you will need to topcoat it or it will deteriorate.
 

projectnut

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#16
PPG Aquapon 35 is a chemical resistant paint
http://www.ppghighperformancecoatin...UAPON®/AQUAPON®-35-Polyamide-Epoxy-Gloss.aspx
Por 15 Is acid based and Not What You Want
POR 15 is a chemical resistant paint. If you go to their website you'll see it's used in a multitude of different scenarios including sewage treatment plants. Here's a clip explaining it's usage:
"POR-15® is a high performance, versatile aromatic moisture cured polyurethane coating designed for application directly on rusted or seasoned metal surfaces and concrete. It dries to a rock-hard, non-porous finish that does not chip, crack, or peel. Because POR-15® is non-porous, it is an excellent sealer for porous substrates and it completely protects from water, chemicals, salt, and mineral oils. The highly porous characteristics of most substrates and traditional coatings permit harmful elements to penetrate which initiates deterioration. POR-15® is the only coating that is able to protect and extend a surface or structures life expectancy due to its unique non-porous molecular composition. POR-15® is also able to withstand prolonged exposure to temperatures up to 500 degrees Fahrenheit."
 

CNC Dude

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#17
OK, was able to get me ahold of some POR15 Silver. I also got the Metal Prep. Will be trying this over the weekend after I sand the heck out of the metal pieces I will be painting. I will let you know how it all went.

But be aware the guy at the store told me to be careful with the blasted paint! He told me "wherever this lands, that's where it will stay. Even your fingers! If you get them on your skin, it will take months for it to wear out!"

I find it hard to believe paint can take months to get out of my skin, but I will certainly be using gloves!
 

projectnut

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#18
I used some a couple weeks ago to paint the propane tank on our motorhome. Unbeknownst tome I must have touched the tank with my leg. I still have a bright silver mark about 3" long on my left calf. A few tips when using the paint:

1. Use disposable brushes, one for every coat. It cost more for the solvent to clean them than it does to use the brush once and throw it away.

2. Don't shake the paint to mix it. You'll get air bubbles in it and never be able to brush them out.

3. Wear disposable rubber gloves for obvious reasons.

4. Don't use the paint straight out of the can, pour some in a disposable container. Continually dipping the brush in the can will transfer moisture from the air and the surface being painted into the can. Moisture is what cures the paint. With moisture in the can it'll become a rock in a short period of time.

5. After pouring some paint in a disposable container place a piece of saran wrap over the open can and replace the lid. The saran wrap will keep the paint on the lid from adhering to the can, and vice versa. If you do get paint between the lid and the can you'll never get it off.

6. Store the unused portion of the paint in a refrigerator if possible. Refrigeration will make it last longer. My first can lasted about 5 years and a second use when kept in a cool dry basement with saran between the top and the can. I finally had to throw the remnants away last month and buy a new can.

7. Make sure you use it in an area with plenty of ventilation and no open flames or pilot lights. It's highly flammable, and the fumes are noxious.

8. No petroleum or citrus based solvents or cleaners will remove the paint from any surface. It literally has to be sanded or chipped off if it lands on the floor or another surface.
 

CNC Dude

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#20
Your problem is super simple to solve! Just take a day to paint your floor, your cat and EVERYTHING in the path of your paintbrush, and chances are you will end up painting that thing you thought you couldn't paint ;-)
 

brino

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#21
Just take a day to paint your floor, your cat and EVERYTHING in the path of your paintbrush, and chances are you will end up painting that thing you thought you couldn't paint ;-)
I picture the Mr. Bean painting method.



-brino
 
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