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What Do You Use To Draw/design Projects?

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coherent

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I used to always just use a pencil and paper, but once I became proficient in Autocad years ago, I use it for most 2d parts or cnc plasma projects. Simply because I can do it faster and more accurately. Plus the ability to print out different views to scale helps with some projects especially if you wand to do simple templates to use with a punch for drill hole placement etc. For 3d parts for the CNC mill or 3d Printer, Inventor is the ticket. With it's ability to do the CAM and output your machines g code file (or and STL for the 3D printer) it's hard to beat.
 

BRIAN

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Q Cad the free version is very good , but it is worth upgrading to the professional for the extras.
I have found this so easy to use. I only use 2D but it will do 3.
Also the instruction book is in a class of it's own. you can learn cad from the basics up. a fine teaching aid.
I do not use the output for G code but I understand it is available.
Brian.
 

Shadowdog500

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I started using Fusion 360 a few months ago. It is easy to learn and is free for hobbyists. For really simple stuff I still make a hand sketch on the whiteboard next to my lathe and mill and take a photo for later reference. Chris


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jamby

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I have used generic cad, autocad, visual cad, catia, unigraphics, and am currently using qcad and cambam to create and cut parts. I've built local business in sketchup for google maps.
Families of parts I draw up in qcad and define the geometry labels so I can print out a pdf with the names to use in apt360. (ancient programming language)
I've just got an aversion to anything I don't buy or at least get a disk for.

Jim
 

Techee

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RJ, Thank you for the advice on how to get the trial for Fusion 360.

I downloaded it on June 17 & have playing with it on & off ever since. I have made a sketch of a simple bracket & started to dimension it.

I still have to the learn the basics of the software & this has opened a whole new world for me!!!

I am an 'old school' guy & this technology is going to keep my brain working & definitely improve my hobbyist skills!
Here is the site for Fusion 360:
http://www.autodesk.com/products/fusion-360/try-buy

Download the 30 day free trial. Once you have downloaded and installed, you will be notified of the time remaining. You can register for the unlimited free use providing you are: 1. a student, 2. an educator, 3. a hobbyist. 4. a startup business (<$100K/yr profit). The free subscription is limited to 1 or 3 years but can be renewed.

Info on setting up free subscription:
https://knowledge.autodesk.com/supp...-or-educational-licensing-for-Fusion-360.html

Re providing personal details in exchange for free software, nothing is truly free. IMO, it is a small price to pay to get some quality software.
I am now learning about all the YouTube videos & the support system this software has.
 

rtp_burnsville

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It varies......

Electronic circuits and schematics - KiCad
Mechanical and assemblies - ZW3D
Woodworking CNC- VCarve Pro or VCarve Cut 2D
CAM - SprutCam, VCarve
Somethings just require a pencil and some graph paper.

Robert
 

Downunder Bob

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I use Amish-Cad 1.0, a 8-1/2" x 11" piece of paper and a #2 pencil, pretty soon I'm going to upgrade to Amish-Cad 1.2, which also includes an eraser.
We have very few Amish here in Downunder, but it sounds very similar to my Outback Cad. I've got 2 or 3 pencils, 0.5 and 0.7 mm clutch type and a number of erasers, I seem to use more erasers than pencils. We don't use that size paper here because we're metric, so it's A4 210 x 297 mm. aka 8.27" x 11.89"

At the end of the day I use what works, " If it aint broke, don't fix it".

Good luck,

Bob.
 

wrmiller

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I have a engineer's notebook that I use to jot down stuff I want to remember. I have a couple of those mechanical drafting pencils to sketch/write with.

I've also put a small white board with dry erase markers on the wall near my mill. I like it so much I'm going to put one next to the lathe as well. If I decide I want to capture something on the white board for use/reference later, I use my phone to take a pic. :)
 

benmychree

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Call me old fashioned ----- I have a drafting table that I built myself that has a top surface with a self healing pad and is about 3 X 4 ft and inclinable; add to this a Universal drafting machine with adjustable ball bearing hinge points that is about WW-1 vintage and use mechanical collet type pencils and all the small tools that I bought when I took drafting in high school and junior college about 1963 and 4. I know that modern computer programs can do things that I can't, but I can make drawings with such as line work that makes a drawing much clearer, especially with round objects.
 

Downunder Bob

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Call me old fashioned ----- I have a drafting table that I built myself that has a top surface with a self healing pad and is about 3 X 4 ft and inclinable; add to this a Universal drafting machine with adjustable ball bearing hinge points that is about WW-1 vintage and use mechanical collet type pencils and all the small tools that I bought when I took drafting in high school and junior college about 1963 and 4. I know that modern computer programs can do things that I can't, but I can make drawings with such as line work that makes a drawing much clearer, especially with round objects.
I guess I'm a little old fashioned too, I started my apprenticeship in 1961, (5 years). Fitting and Turning plus the extra year for toolmaking. Tech drawing was the subject I did the best in at trade school, and the one I like the most as well. I scored 85% so was pretty happy.

I still prefer a pencil drawing although these days mostly it's only a sketch at best, most of it is in my head. I might jot down a couple of crucial dimensions, but I am going to get a whiteboard and put it up near the head of the lathe. I'm sure it will be handy.

I'm also not into DRO's and CAD/CAM, CNC. I figure we are hobby machinists, not programmers. Those devices are fine in a production environment, The only electronic device I have succumbed too so far. is a 6"digtal caliper as my eyesight is getting too old to read the vernier any more.

Cheers, Bob.
 

firestopper

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I doodle the part on paper, check my measurements and build it.
For items like bumpers,consoles, dash boards etc. I make templates using cardboard and make changes as I go.
If I'm using the CNC plasma, I HAVE to use BobCad V21 and SheetCam (takes me too long).
If Im building a custom project, I build it from my head as I go. It seems for years now, when I lay down to sleep the current project runs though my thoughts in different variations until I finally fall asleep. Its sort of a curse as I get up early regardless of sleep quality, but have come up with decent ideas. Personal projects are the worst "sleep stealers".
I do envy those with computer skills....Very much.
I also own a nice drafting table with a decent compliment of tools that I use from time to time when I need to outsource something too large for my shop machines.
 
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benmychree

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I guess I'm a little old fashioned too, I started my apprenticeship in 1961, (5 years). Fitting and Turning plus the extra year for toolmaking. Tech drawing was the subject I did the best in at trade school, and the one I like the most as well. I scored 85% so was pretty happy.

I still prefer a pencil drawing although these days mostly it's only a sketch at best, most of it is in my head. I might jot down a couple of crucial dimensions, but I am going to get a whiteboard and put it up near the head of the lathe. I'm sure it will be handy.

I'm also not into DRO's and CAD/CAM, CNC. I figure we are hobby machinists, not programmers. Those devices are fine in a production environment, The only electronic device I have succumbed too so far. is a 6"digtal caliper as my eyesight is getting too old to read the vernier any more.

Cheers, Bob.
It would seem that you and I are living parallel lives! The closest I ever came to a DRO, etc. is a Travadial on my lathe at home. At my business shop I had a DRO on my Induma vertical mill, but that was about 6 years ago, so I'm hoping that it no longer counts.
 

Downunder Bob

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It would seem that you and I are living parallel lives! The closest I ever came to a DRO, etc. is a Travadial on my lathe at home. At my business shop I had a DRO on my Induma vertical mill, but that was about 6 years ago, so I'm hoping that it no longer counts.
I'm sure we're not the only ones, Plenty of people, like us, that like the traditional ways. And then there are those who like to push the boundries and learn new things. And that's fine too. It's mostly the younger ones who have plenty of time. I simply don't have time to learn autocad and the like, but for those who can use it to enhance their career path, yeh, go for it.

Bob
 

Scruffy

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For my cad designing I've found that a empty 24 pack of miller lite is the perfect material. Flat, easy to draw on, easy to cut.
You were discussing cardboard aided design ,weren't we?
Thanks scruffy
 

Brian Hutchings

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Some years ago I bought DesignCad 3D but my brain doesn't work in 3D so I now have a much later version of DesignCad 2D. I tend to use it as an electronic drawing board and I find that this suits my needs which is designing scale models of very old traction engines. My current one is an 1858 Burrell with Boydels Patent endless railway.
Brian
 
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