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What Do You Use To Draw/design Projects?

Drafty

Iron
Registered Member
#31
I use Inventor 2010, a left over from when I ran a drafting business. The 3D aspect helps to reveal clashes or to make improvements to the model.
 
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Grandpop

Active Member
Active Member
#32
Old Autocad 14 for 2d. If I need anything more I take it to work and do it in CATIA 3d. Would love to have a simple buy it once and leave me alone 3d for home, but havn't found one yet
 

joebiplane

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#34
Not being a student, how does one get the Fusion 360 program???
And same BS, trying to get a free program and they want EVERY detail, including you work address, home phone number??????

No wonder this stuff is pirated so often...grrr
Don't get rattled and "Don't look a gift horde in the mouth"
Just follow through and you will come to an option to be a Hobbiest and the door will open to a freebie if you are !' a start up businesss or 2 if you are a hobbiest.... just don't sell more than $ 100K in products in year. you will have to renew each year FOR FREE as long as you want it with same $ 100K restrictions as the first year...... NOT A BADDDD DEAL Is it ?
 

richardsrelics

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
H-M Supporter-Premium
#35
No, in fact after the fine prompting from you folks, it is installed... On a side note, I got a call from the person I bought the Logan 820 from, he had some more parts.... I got the turret originally and was really hoping for a tail stock. When I showed up, he pointed to a big box, and said it was quite heavy, I opened it, about 400 taps, and 50-100 HSS tool bits and about 50 drill bits. As I am rummaging, he opened a cabinet and says hey does this go with it??? it was the flipping tail stock.. Very good day. It has already been verified as the correct Logan tail stock for my lathe, and it has been disassembled, cleaned, primed and painted... whew..busy night
 

Bill C.

Active User
Active Member
#37
Maybe I'm sentimental and old-fashioned, but I rather use the T-square and pencil. My dad was an architect and I got his oak frame with maple top drafting table.
That was the way I was trained. Add "Do Not Scale" somewhere on your drawing and then scan it in your computer. I was told years ago some printers would reduce a drawing just enough to fit the paper better. I have Associate Degree in Mechanical Drafting before CAD became popular to industry.
 

Bill C.

Active User
Active Member
#39
I have used Cad Standard Lite (Free) on this laptop. It is the speed of drawing that is the challenge for me. I feel any good quality computer running any of the high quality programs and what is called a digitizer pad that will speed the process up. Walmart sells the pad, Wacom Intuos Pen and Touch, Medium Tablet It not the cheapest and you still need a drawing to trace from. Sorry I could be more helpful.
 

RJSakowski

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
H-M Supporter-Premium
#41
I was told years ago some printers would reduce a drawing just enough to fit the paper better.
This was certainly true for earlier printers. All the printers (HP LaserJet, Epson, Brother) that I have used in the past fifteen or twenty years have been spot on for scale. To ceck the scaling, I print make a 7" x 10" rectangle and measure. With my machinist's rule, I can measure to 1/50th of an inch giving me .002"/" accuracy which is better than my layout skills.

While I go by the numbers for reading drawings, I use 1:1 drawings as templates for various projects. For example, cutting a gasket for an engine, I would print out the drawing and glue it to the gasket material with paper cement, cut the gasket, and peel the template. Better accuracy than trying to draw out the gasket on the gasket material. I also used a printer for making 1:1 transparencies for printed circuit masks. A third use was making a 1:1 template to check the fit of a design prior to cutting metal.
 

Uglydog

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#43
I've got a piece of birch.
and ... Draughtsmans T Square, triangles, protractor, pencil.
I have no intention of updating.

Daryl
 

middle.road

Active User
Active Member
#44
-SNIP- I was told years ago some printers would reduce a drawing just enough to fit the paper better. -SNIP-
Depends on the Program used, Printer and the software drivers for the printer.
Postscript has always worked best for me, all others I've had to adjust.
I have binary .DXF files from years ago that are a graduated scale/ruler/tick marks drawing that run diagonally across the page, print/plot that
out and then measure for accuracy. Have usually had to adjust 'em even back to pen plotter, and electrostatic plotter days.
I made some transparent scales for my miter saw the other day on ol' matte finish Sticky-Back. It was off ~.040" over 11", not too bad.
I'm just going to be using them for rough cuts, and they'll probably wear off in a month or so...
 

middle.road

Active User
Active Member
#45
I have used Cad Standard Lite (Free) on this laptop. It is the speed of drawing that is the challenge for me. I feel any good quality computer running any of the high quality programs and what is called a digitizer pad that will speed the process up. Walmart sells the pad, Wacom Intuos Pen and Touch, Medium Tablet It not the cheapest and you still need a drawing to trace from. Sorry I could be more helpful.
I miss my Kurta tablets. Had a 12x12, and a 12x18, and I'll be d*mmed if I know where they disappeared to. :(
 

sanddan

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#46
So do ALL veteran's have access to this? and is it for just a given time period, or unlimited time frame?
You need a DD214, I had a bunch in my packet I got when discharged, and that will get you a copy for one year ($25 I think for shipping the disk). I had to go through the same paperwork this year to get a 2015 copy. I'm not sure how long you can keep getting a new copy.
 

astroracer

Active Member
Active Member
#48
I have been running 3D Cad since '86. Got onto Unigraphics in '93 and been using that ever since. I have an old copy of NX6 at home. And am running V10 at work (GM). Does everything I need it to do and I have modeled everything from model car parts, machining tools, chassis and suspensions to a wooden cabinet I built in '09, the deck railing I built last year and a wheel chair ramp I am working on for friend. I sort out a lot of design issues in CAD and can then detail everything up. NO mistakes is good.
I posted this build here. An Adjustable Angle Plate.
The Cad File.
photo-vi.jpg
The finished plate.
MVC008S-vi.jpg
Mark
 

Attachments

Uglydog

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#50
Especially for new members here.
Please note that all the really cool digital stuff is good and appropriate.
But, as Bill Gruby has identified, paper and pencil works as well today as it did in a century ago.
It's cheap and reliable.
Nothing against the new tech.
It's all good at HM!!!!!!!!!!!

Daryl
MN
 

uncle harry

Active User
Active Member
#51
Especially for new members here.
Please note that all the really cool digital stuff is good and appropriate.
But, as Bill Gruby has identified, paper and pencil works as well today as it did in a century ago.
It's cheap and reliable.
Nothing against the new tech.
It's all good at HM!!!!!!!!!!!

Daryl
MN
Pencil/pen & vellum got us through the big one & the moon landing. New stuff has it's advantages & disadvantages. I like both/
 

4gsr

Global Moderator
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium
#54
Found out yesterday, one of my clients I do design work for, is going to set me up with a seat of Solidworks! Yeah!!! Ugh!!! Now I got to learn it! I took a four day class on using it three years ago. I'll probably have to go take the course again...
 

Cheeseking

Active User
Active Member
#55
You will love it but once you get spoiled with the real deal it's going to be a downshift giving it up. My SW2015 is a home use license from my work. If any of you use SW at work and your employer allows it, its easy just contact your reseller and they get you the codes. Mine was a bit trickier since we have network license for most engineers. I'm pretty sure the HUL is for stand alone seats which we have a few.
For network HUL it may be possible but you would need remote network access to the computer with the license running on it.
 

wildo

Active Member
Active Member
#59
Wow. A surprising amount of CAD users here! I'll be the first to claim Google Sketchup (the free version, at that). Though, if you're looking for true drafting type of project layout where you get the top, side, and back view, perhaps Sketchup isn't for you in the traditional sense. It still allows you to see all views at once though, and dimension them. For a free tool- I find it to be exceptionally capable. My entire machine shop was designed in Sketchup.
 

bill4227

Iron
Registered Member
#60
I use AutoCAD 2016. I have also used Draftsight. Free download. Works great but may be a learning curve if not used to a high end CAD program.