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What Are Your Favorite V-blocks?

Steve Shannon

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#3
This would be something to purchase today using the Enco 25% and free shipping deal.


[emoji1010] Steve Shannon [emoji1010]
 

housedad

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#5
I wnt ahead and ordered those blocks. I did take advantage of the enco sale on some other stuff, though.

Enco has FREE shipping on $199 or more and it INCLUDES MACHINERY During March.

Code MAR199FS
 

4gsr

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#6
Interested thread. I have several sets of vee blocks and yet had a use for them, except for one pair. A precision set of Fowler vee blocks I use on the surface plate for checking runout on shafts, tubes, mandrels and such. As for using them on the mill, never have.
Am I missing something here?
 

cathead

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#7
Home made vee blocks since you can make them to your needs and have the satisfaction of making your own.:penny:
 

pineyfolks

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#11
Interested thread. I have several sets of vee blocks and yet had a use for them, except for one pair. A precision set of Fowler vee blocks I use on the surface plate for checking runout on shafts, tubes, mandrels and such. As for using them on the mill, never have.
Am I missing something here?[/QUOTE

I use my v-blocks in my vise on the mill to hold round stock perpendicular when milling. Set it against the solid jaw and clamp. Work great for angle cuts too.
 

EmilioG

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#12
I have vintage B&S 749-1's, matched and Starrett hardened precision large v blocks and have to say the Starrett s are THE best I've seen. The Starretts are matched also.

I love the two hole clamps. They come in handy with round work in a vise against the jaw.
No slip.
 
Last edited:

P T Schram

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#13
The caption asked what are your favorite Vee Blocks so I answered the question. By far my favorite Vee Blocks
are ones I have made myself. :)
It's all good.

My time in the shop is so limited that it is precious indeed and therefor, it is almost always in my best interests to buy rather than build.

My machinery exists solely to support my other activities and has to pay for itself, either by making parts/tools for trucks in the shop, or directly by either fixing things for others, or making things for others.

Every square inch has a dollar value assigned to it, otherwise, I couldn't pay the mortgage and I REALLY, REALLY like having my shop at my home, in spite of my wife wanting a brewery in what is now my machine shop-but, I do admit, I'm outgrowing the space and should consider moving the machinery back into the main shop space and building the brew pub we both want.
 

cathead

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#14
It's all good.

My time in the shop is so limited that it is precious indeed and therefor, it is almost always in my best interests to buy rather than build.

My machinery exists solely to support my other activities and has to pay for itself, either by making parts/tools for trucks in the shop, or directly by either fixing things for others, or making things for others.

Every square inch has a dollar value assigned to it, otherwise, I couldn't pay the mortgage and I REALLY, REALLY like having my shop at my home, in spite of my wife wanting a brewery in what is now my machine shop-but, I do admit, I'm outgrowing the space and should consider moving the machinery back into the main shop space and building the brew pub we both want.

I'm retired so have the time to make my own stuff. I can see your position being busy working and your other activities as well.
The photo of the blocks by HO looked pretty nice to me. I have a few toolage items by Shars and have have been happy with
their quality so far for what I do. There comes a point for me where the complexity of a tool makes it more sensible to buy
it ready made. The machining hobby is all good fun so have been enjoying fabricating what I can. Good luck to you and I hope you find some blocks to your liking.

:beer:
 

P T Schram

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#15
I dream of retiring and spending more time in the shop finally making the things I have been drawing/dreaming of for so long.

I consider myself to be blessed to live in America where I can work as much as I wish, as hard as I wish and do the things that make me happy and feed myself and my family.
 

Ulma Doctor

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#16
i have a pair of Starrett v blocks that are very nice, but they don't see much action. i'm afraid to scratch them up.
they were won at auction cheap, but i still can't seem to bring myself to soil them, so they only go on the surface plate.
now as for the ones that go on the bench, grinder or mill, i have a few cheap cast iron V's that take most of the abuse. i'll scrape them back in, as they wear.
i was fortunate enough to find an auction from a toolmaker that had passed, i got couple that he made.
i have made them from wood (Oak & Fir) too, for shop (bench) use.
i use these as rotor supports for repairing electric motors and vacuum pumps or any time precision is not necessary .
 

Ulma Doctor

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#17
Interested thread. I have several sets of vee blocks and yet had a use for them, except for one pair. A precision set of Fowler vee blocks I use on the surface plate for checking runout on shafts, tubes, mandrels and such. As for using them on the mill, never have.
Am I missing something here?
Hi Ken,
V blocks are good for keyway work on both vertical and horizontal mills.
i modify motors on occasion, i use the v blocks to support the rotor
 

TommyD

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#18
I worked as a Mfg Engineer in a shop that did aircraft work. I'd present first piece for inspection and afterward it was up to the operator to submit pieces during the run for in process inspection. One time after first piece was accepted the operator came in saying all pieces were being rejected because the piece he submitted to QC was out of spec on concentricity. They were using V blocks to check the pieces, good blocks too, I forget the brand but we were a Pratt certified supplier. I went to check the set up, the cutter, process and couldn't find anything wrong. I went in to QC and asked to look at their blocks, they had 2 they were using that had recently come in to the shop. I put a gage pin in each and used an indicator on a height stand to check and found, when flipping the V block 180 degrees, on one block the V wasn't on center to the outside. Check your blocks for concentricity if what you are doing matters.
 

beaner74

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#19
I use all my blocks and like them all. I've made most of them. I will show some. But how do I post things on the feed?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

EmilioG

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#20
I worked as a Mfg Engineer in a shop that did aircraft work. I'd present first piece for inspection and afterward it was up to the operator to submit pieces during the run for in process inspection. One time after first piece was accepted the operator came in saying all pieces were being rejected because the piece he submitted to QC was out of spec on concentricity. They were using V blocks to check the pieces, good blocks too, I forget the brand but we were a Pratt certified supplier. I went to check the set up, the cutter, process and couldn't find anything wrong. I went in to QC and asked to look at their blocks, they had 2 they were using that had recently come in to the shop. I put a gage pin in each and used an indicator on a height stand to check and found, when flipping the V block 180 degrees, on one block the V wasn't on center to the outside. Check your blocks for concentricity if what you are doing matters.
I thought V blocks were checked using a gage pin and a depth mic on each side? How is this done with a DI?
 

Tony Wells

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#21
I don't really have favorites, but I do use a particular set more than others, mainly due to the size and nature of what little work I am able to do. Pics below.

Can't remember exactly how I ended up with a single granite vee block, but if memory serves, it was in an "empty" toolbox in a trade deal, and they guy said he didn't have the mate to it and didn't want it back. photo 3.JPG photo 1.JPG photo 2.JPG

I guess two of them are technically not "vee" blocks, but they are marketed and function as such. Those are the ones I use most. And I rarely use them away from he surface plate.
 

4gsr

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#22
Tony, I bought a set just like that for the inspection department for checking runout on mandrels at a place I worked at to replace a junky set they were using. They couldn't figure them out. I even showed them how to use them with a sample part. Still didn't like them. They went back to using the junky one's they had. The new one's were put on a shelf and were still there when I left the company a few years later. Ken
 

Tony Wells

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#23
I love them. Low friction, settable. Used to have a lot of HVOF carbide done by you probably know who down there (Ave H, near Navigation), and they are perfect for checking runout and straightnesss on smaller parts.
 
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