• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
  • PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

[Shaper] Using A 7" Ammco Shaper

ndnchf

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2016
Messages
203
Likes
326
#1
New guy on the forum here. I didn't see a sub-forum dedicated to shapers or AMMCO, so I hope this is a good place to post.

Last year I bought a nice 7" AMMCO shaper. I cleaned, oiled and mounted it on a stand. It runs beautifully and I've played with it a little, but have not really used it for anything serious. I just have the one bit it came with, so I need to grind a couple more.

If you have a similar size shaper, what tasks do you use it for - what have you made? I also have a 12" Atlas lathe, Enco bench mill/drill, Delta surface grinder and the other usual home shop equipment. So I have tools for other uses. But what kind of jobs would be best suited to this little shaper? I don't really need anything made at the moment, but would like to try some small practice projects.

Thanks - appreciate your thoughts.
 

rgray

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2012
Messages
809
Likes
352
#2

Ulma Doctor

Infinitely Curious
Active Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2013
Messages
4,288
Likes
3,473
#3
New guy on the forum here. I didn't see a sub-forum dedicated to shapers or AMMCO, so I hope this is a good place to post.
Last year I bought a nice 7" AMMCO shaper. I cleaned, oiled and mounted it on a stand. It runs beautifully and I've played with it a little, but have not really used it for anything serious. I just have the one bit it came with, so I need to grind a couple more.
If you have a similar size shaper, what tasks do you use it for - what have you made? I also have a 12" Atlas lathe, Enco bench mill/drill, Delta surface grinder and the other usual home shop equipment. So I have tools for other uses. But what kind of jobs would be best suited to this little shaper? I don't really need anything made at the moment, but would like to try some small practice projects.
Thanks - appreciate your thoughts.
Hi ndnchf,
congratulations on the shaper!
Ammco shapers were manufactured by Delta/Rockwell and wore the Ammco badge, that's why you don't see a forum heading.
shaper bits are very similar to grinding lathe bits

i too am looking for projects to do.
as rgray said, i made some t nuts from 6061 aluminum as a first project.
i'm thinking to shamelessly plagiarize a homebrew hacksaw attachment, just for fun.
:grin:
 

ndnchf

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2016
Messages
203
Likes
326
#4
I wish I had a cute little rotary table like that! It would be a perfect compliment to my shaper. That's a nice little project too. I recall reading a while back that AMMCO first made these, then they were purchased by Delta/Rockwell, but they kept the name. I'll peruse that forum - thanks for the pointer. The hacksaw mod is a neat idea. Id like to see one on a 7" shaper. Here's a photo of mine.

FinishedAMMCO_zpslxhgwqkw.jpg
 

CluelessNewB

Active Resistor
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Messages
980
Likes
422
#6
I have the South Bend 7". I have used it for a few small projects but most recently to mill flats on round shafts. I will be doing that again real soon to make a new shaft for my Atlas Mill project.
 

brino

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2014
Messages
2,842
Likes
2,615
#7
Hi ndnchf,

For some documentation, you might try this page and search for "shaper" in your browser (usually control-f)
http://vintagemachinery.org/mfgIndex/detail.aspx?id=1141&tab=3

Specifically this really looks a lot like your machine:
http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/detail.aspx?id=3658
right down to the cut-outs on the belt guard.

As for interesting projects I have nothing particular, but here's some links to some jobs other members did with them:

Here is Greg (@f350ca) cutting a keyway in a gear that must weight a good part of what his shaper does:
http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/building-an-aligator.24445/page-2#post-311543

Here is @francist making replacement fingers for his finger brake:
http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/brake-fingers.50968/

maybe that will give you some ideas......
(I am still looking for one I remember about some dovetail ways being cut on a shaper....if I find it I will post back here)

Also, if you have not found it here's a thread on an Ammco restoration with some good info:
http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/ammco-shaper-restoration-problems.31578/#post-268784

and a couple more on what to use a shaper for:
http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/what-could-i-use-a-shaper-for.28881/#post-251917
http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/what-did-you-make-on-your-shaper.22172/

Good luck and have fun!
-brino

EDIT: I found the dovetail way pictures....they are in post 12 in that last link above!
 

ndnchf

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2016
Messages
203
Likes
326
#8
Thanks Brino! I'll read through the links you provided. I have all the manuals, bulletins etc., so I'm good there. Note the 3-ring binder below the shaper in my photo. I keep them handy!
 

ndnchf

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2016
Messages
203
Likes
326
#10
I like that center drill idea, very clever. I hadn't thought of using the shaper for dovetails, bit it really is ideal for it. Thanks.
 

mcostello

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2013
Messages
309
Likes
117
#14
Indexing for the splines is right there in Your face. :D The holes were laid out on a rotary table. I used the level from a Starrett square head and 2 close fitting pins to level across 2 holes. After finishing the splines the holes were turned off giving the customer no idea how it was done. Was wondering if anyone would notice.
 

machinejack

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2014
Messages
17
Likes
9
#15
Nice find I have one just like it but not in as nice a shape. Mine was in a ditch behind an old shop. Just so much useless junk sitting around. Cleaned up nice the bull gear is fiber and had a bald spot missing teeth where it tool would strike the material. I rotated the gear so fresh teeth were in place for the power stroke used JB Weld to fashion new teeth at the rear of the stroke where there was no load and she cuts smooth now. Having a full machine in the garage not much use for a small shaper. To answer your question I used it for cutting key slots in some parts I had made. Not wanting to buy a broach it worked like a charm. Made a tool similar to a boring bar but attached on the end by a bolt on the clapper box. I was cleaning the shop today and dug it out to use it / play some.
Jack
 

urmacher

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2014
Messages
10
Likes
23
#16
I use mine for machining flat surfaces on anything from a clamp to hold down my panavise, to an adapter plate to mount a Sherline spindle assembly on a Taig mill. It can work while I am doing something else and uses cheap, easily sharpened lathe bits. It can make angled cuts without the expense of special cutters. The main reason I use it is it is fun to watch all of the moving parts in action, just to make a flat surface.
Chuck
 

projectnut

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2014
Messages
175
Likes
56
#17
I have a little earlier model AMMCO 7" shaper. About the only notable difference I can see is the earlier version has only a single oiler on each side of the ram. It came straight from the Badger Ordinance Depot in Baraboo Wisconsin. They shut down the place a few years ago and auctioned off all the machine tools. A friend of mine went to the auction looking for a dividing head. It just so happened the shaper was in the same lot as the tool he was looking for. He knew I was looking for a shaper so he bid on the lot and won.
Mine is a WWII vintage complete with an OD paint job and plaque proclaiming it meets the War Board standards. It's in like new condition except for the scratched paint that shows it has "experience". From what I can tell the machine was mainly used for brass parts since that was the only swarf I could find on it when doing a thorough cleaning.
I use it mainly for flat work and slotting. I'm in the process of fabricating some tooling for internal keyways.

Here are a few pictures taken in 2014. The machine is a little cleaner now and resides in a different section of the shop


DSCF8072.JPG

DSCF8073.JPG

DSCF8103.JPG
 

Richard White (richardsrelics)

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2015
Messages
150
Likes
106
#18
I recently acquired one of these gems as well...Have not used a shaper in a coons age but the principle is wickedly simple.
I am going to set it up to do internal a 4 mm key way I have these hubs for tools I make and the bore ranges from .467 to .900
The key ways are cut on a 5* taper so there is that. It is between 1.375 to 1.500 length of cut.
My quandary is trying to make a tool holder that will hold my cutter that will have the strength to make these cuts in the smallest of the bores and yet be able to do this efficiently.
I currently use a broach and an arbor press but I am growing tired of this process as this job should run for about 10-15 more years for me, then I can pass the torch to the next individual to make the tools
So any thoughts or experiences on making a tool that will work?
4 mm square key way.
I have thought about just welding it to a bar or square stock but on the smaller bores there just will not be much room for chips.
The smallest of the bores is not the most popular so I may just broach those and use the machine for the higher volume parts.
The machine came with a tool already and it was for what you ask?, a .150 wide key way AND it is long enough to do the job, but with relief already ground it is not wide enough to get the key cut without moving it over to going to depth a second time. Dang so close...lol
Goal is to load part, start machine, adjusting the tool head while running to get the proper depth of cut.
With so little experience using the machine and the types of tooling that can be used it is kind of like writers block. I guess I have to go back to the beginning and look at it this way..
Highly unlikely I will or could break this machine being that I am machining aluminum, so I will just copy what is on it, but a tad bigger to allow me to cut the 4 mm key and if it does not hold I will have succeeded in proving one tool that won't work and try something else..
 

projectnut

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2014
Messages
175
Likes
56
#19
Here's a link to the 1955 AMMCO Shaper Manual:

http://www.lathe.com/catalogs/Ammco7ShaperColor.pdf

Page 6 shows one style internal key cutter in use. Page 7 shows 2 additional different style internal key cutters. I've made both styles, and they seem to work just fine. Also if you Google images for "shaper internal key cutting attachment" you'll see several other variations, including some that use carbide inserts.

Note: There's also a 1950 version of the same manual (No. 27-100) that doesn't have the same attachments listed or shown.
 
Container Above bottom breadcrumb