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Unmarked Double Barrel Percussion Cap Long-gun.

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Joncooey

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#1
Hi Guys;

I hope that maybe someone can help identify this long gun. It was given to me by the In-laws who have been here (Northumberland County, Ontario, Canada) since 1805.
Some one has abused the stock; I've tied it up. One barrel is smooth bore; measures about .678. The other is rifled with straight rifling; measures about .430 between the lands.
Appreciate any input.

Jon. Muzzle1.jpg Muzzle2.jpg Muzzle4.jpg Muzzle3.jpg
 

dulltool17

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#2
I have no idea, but that is one cool firearm! I'd guess that the one is intended to be for birdshot while the other would take a patched round ball.
It was built for "opportunistic" hunting, likely at a time when one had to take whatever showed itself, rather than what was "in season." and meant the difference between eating and going hungry.

Since the percussion cap didn't come to the fore until 1822, it would have to be later. Here's another such example with a bit of history:
http://www.gunbroker.com/item/620043345

Yours is a bit fancier than the one in my link.

even if it only hangs on the wall, it is a cool piece of history!

Doug
 

Old Squier

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#3
Like dulltool says, you have a very cool piece of history. It's also sort of perplexing.

Guns with one rifle and one shotgun barrel - as opposed to "drilling guns" that feature 3 or even 4 barrels - used to be called "cape guns". Like dull tool says, they were used for opportunistic hunting on a wide variety of game. They originated in South Africa. Wikipedia points out that the biggest makers of these combination guns - Germany and Austria - put the rifled barrel on the right side, not on the left side like your gun. I have a gut feeling that it's a French rifle or maybe even made in Canada by a French gunmaker. I can't prove it though, and it's just a guess.

Are there any proof marks on the gun? Any verbiage at all to give us some clues as to its origins? Let us know, maybe someone can make a certain ID.

Squire

Sent Using Tapatalk - Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, Tahlequah OK
 

dulltool17

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#4
Very good observation, Squire. I overlooked the barrel orientation.
Yes, the Germans and Austrians favored the rifle barrel on right.
French, or French-Canadian makes a lot of sense.
Proof marks or other identifying marks would be helpful.

If I get through my current projects, I'd like to take a crack at a modern version of one!
 

Joncooey

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#5
I've gone over this gun again and haven't found any maker's marks. I am at a loss on another point; should I clean all of the crud off of it or leave it? Disassemble it and repair it or just hang it on the wall? Some of the tin work has a bit of a green patina in places; probably pewter or is it a silver alloy? Some of it is good heavy gauge, too; maybe 16 gauge or better. Anyway, thanks for the constructive input.

Jon.
 

T Bredehoft

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#6
put the rifled barrel on the right side,
Is not the rifled barrel on the right? the one good image shows it on the left, but that's the muzzle end, is it not?

Also, could that be a very slow twist? appearing straight?
 

Joncooey

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#7
You are looking at the business end in the photo with the sights up and the ram-rod down; the rifled barrel is on the left. If you were holding the gun and aiming it, the rifled barrel would be on the right. The rifling could be curved, but not so much to be visible to the eye. Now that it has been mentioned, it does seem to have a more German feel to the etchings. There is a leaping stag on the side of the stock and vine like scroll-work, etc. on the tin-work, reminiscent of Black Forest design. Damascus steel barrels, too.
 

Old Squier

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#8
You are looking at the business end in the photo with the sights up and the ram-rod down; the rifled barrel is on the left. If you were holding the gun and aiming it, the rifled barrel would be on the right. The rifling could be curved, but not so much to be visible to the eye. Now that it has been mentioned, it does seem to have a more German feel to the etchings. There is a leaping stag on the side of the stock and vine like scroll-work, etc. on the tin-work, reminiscent of Black Forest design. Damascus steel barrels, too.
Jon, I suspect your gun's shooting days are done. No doubt about it, though, it's very cool! The thing to do is clean it a bit - not too much mind you, then put it on display.

Best of luck!

Old Squire

Sent Using Tapatalk - Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, Tahlequah OK
 

dulltool17

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#9
Yep- right bore is rifled. the hex-shaped rifling was common back then. And most blackpowder rifles have long twists, 1-28, 1-34, etc so it might appear straight.

The stag engraving would make it seem German.

I'm with Squire on this one- clean her up and hang it on the wall to be admired!
 

Silverbullet

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#10
At most I would glue up the broken stock , wipe it down with some good oil NO WD 40 . I'd also run an oiled patch down both barrels. Then I'd hang it high on a wall , not on a working fire place . The heat would ruin it. Take some more pictures and send them to some muzzle loader magazine and navy arms they may know a makers. You may find a maker under the locks , often there hidden even the metal butt pad or under the art work. It's there somewhere . Did you remove the barrel wedge and look under the barrels??
 
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Joncooey

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#11
Silverbullet;

good advice, thanks. I have done nothing to it; less is more, right? I would like to work on it but I will wait until I have the time. Ideally, I would like to reproduce the stock and then reassemble it. It has survived in a damp farm-house basement up until now, so, it's chances of survival now are much better in the possession of someone who cares and , also, in a modern bungalow basement/workshop. Surprisingly, no rust at all. Good Steel? It is Damascus. You are correct and I will oil it. I understand that these old guns need to be kept in good humidity conditions, etc. I think that it's better off now than before. I will up-date as things progress. Thanks for the input.
Jon.
 

Ulma Doctor

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#12
awesome firearm! :drool:
it just screams history!
i have a couple parlor rifles that share a lot of the same features and style although they are single barrel .22 BB Cap rifles.

your combo gun is very cool, thanks for sharing
 
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