1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

    Dismiss Notice

Trouble parting off mild steel Southbend 9A

Discussion in 'A BEGINNER'S FORUM (Learn How To Machine Here!)' started by Threadkiller, May 12, 2017.

  1. Threadkiller

    Threadkiller United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    29
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    Lagrangeville
    State:
    New York

    -Return to Top-

    Good morning everyone. I am clearly doing something wrong. I am a super beginner when it comes to running a lathe. The other day I was trying to part off some spacers out of 1.5" mild steel round bar with some 1/8" HSS parting bit and I couldn't do it for the life of me. I would either stall the lathe which obviously was me trying to take too deep of a cut, but before I would take a cut that deep the bit wouldn't cut anything. One time I snapped the bit because I had too much "stickout" for lack of a better term out of the tool holder. I don't know if I didn't grind the HSS correctly (probably) but I ground it and cooled it off with water between grinds and I had what I thought was a sharp point on it to cut. No matter what I tried the lathe would either stall, bind and slip the belt or I would break the bit. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. tincture500

    tincture500 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    8
    City:
    louisville
    State:
    Kentucky

    -Return to Top-

    Could be a combination of issues.
    Is the cutting tip in the middle or just slightly below the center of the work piece? Too low the bar will try to roll over the tool
    The cutting angle of the tool is ground with adequate relief
    Try to get the cutter mounted as close the the cross feed saddle as possible
    Slow the rotation down and look to see if you have something going on at the point of contact visually.
    Start slow and increase speed



    Sent from my Nexus 10 using Tapatalk
     
  3. 4ssss

    4ssss United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    62
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    Plymouth
    State:
    Connecticut

    -Return to Top-

    I'll give you some solutions since I don't know the real problem. The motor may be stalling. The belt may be slipping. The cut off tool needs to be on center. #1 a new motor is needed. #2 clean the grease and oil from the belt and the pulleys, and tighten the belt. #3 Put the cut off tool on center. Too high and it rubs, too low and it will pick up the piece being cut off and grab it breaking the tool and knocking the part out of the chuck. Also grind the cut off tool with an angle in front facing whichever side you need to face clean so the part is cut off clean while it's still being held by the turned diameter. Use cutting oil. Run it slow. Using the back gears on your lathe will also help in belt slippage.
     
  4. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    3,821
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    USA
    City:
    Sacramento
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    Beyond what has been stated above, the parting blade must be at a true 90 degree angle to the spindle axis, the carriage must be locked down, the compound should have the gib locked on a light lathe like yours, and you should check for looseness in the compound, cross slide, saddle, spindle, and work mounting. When grinding the parting blade, consider the angle that the blade is mounted on the tool post. If it is not level with the cross slide, you must compensate for the mounting angle when you grind the parting blade. The tool should be fed at a rate that gives a continuous chip, not rubbing and not digging in. Once it is cutting, keep it cutting. Some pics of your setup might shed some light on your problem, if it is possible for you to post some. If it is any consolation, most of us have had parting off problems at times. After great success for a long time, I am also currently having problems with it myself. First get the basics right, then get the technique right, and things should improve. Parting off is sometimes how we are kept humble.
     
    mikey likes this.
  5. jocat54

    jocat54 Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    218
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Lindale, Texas
    City:
    Lindale
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    I had very little luck parting with my SB9A-just too light and loose I think. I have had pretty good luck parting with my 12x36--bigger and newer(tighter) but some times it just seems to be no stars in alignment:D. This is using the same HSS parting blades I used on the SB9A and with QCTP.
    It is probably me causing the problem--tool grind and positioning of the parting blade.
     
  6. tq60

    tq60 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    227
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    madera
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    D all of the above....

    The lathe is not the most rigidly built but good enough when limitations known.

    First the shape of parting tool is critical and we may not be able to explain it well but Google "controlled cut with saw blade" which is related to wood cutting and it may give you the general idea.

    Here is where we are going.

    The small lathe has some backlash here and there that all sum together.

    When parting you are pushing the tool into the work so forces are against the backlash so all is well.

    If the tool is too aggressive where it can take a larger bite it could move forward into that bite as there is nothing holding it back.

    A control cut blade in a radial arm saw limits tge bite allowing easy cuts without the saw trying to climb over the material.

    Changing the angles at the front of the tool to cause it to limit the bite may help, we never parted much on the small lathes before as we had difficulties like yiu, we would gut a groove then use saw.

    On bigger units we part just fine.

    Others will come along to advise possible tricks in angles or setup.

    Try cutting just below center as that point a downward force would reduce depth of cut.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
     
  7. fradish

    fradish United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    69
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    Harmony
    State:
    Pennsylvania

    -Return to Top-

    Though not strictly parting advise, if you have a leather belt, you might want to consider
    upgrading to an automotive serpentine belt. I used to use belt dressing on the leather belt on
    my SB9C to try to keep it from slipping, but the serpentine belt is much better. However I have
    to say for a beginner, having a belt that slips a bit isn't the worst thing imaginable. The serpentine
    will still slip occasionally, but I find it makes using the lathe much less frustrating.

    I know most people will scarf and glue the serpentine belt, but since I had alligator clipping I just
    used that. I was used to the click-click from the leather belt and it doesn't bother me. It has
    held up fine for about a year now. I don't run with a huge amount of tension on the belt. Just
    enough so that it doesn't slip during normal use.
     
    mikey likes this.
  8. Paul in OKC

    Paul in OKC United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    128
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Oklahoma City
    State:
    Oklahoma

    -Return to Top-

    Small lathes can be tricky. Hell, parting off is tricky anyway! I used to hate it with a passion, especially with HSS blades. SHoot, I was teaching a class about a year ago at a Vo-Tech, and was doing a part off. Got to show the students that even with 40 years of experience I can still snap off a blade with the best of them :). It is doable, good suggestions given above, Tool on at a hair below center, and definitely at 90 degrees to the part. Light but constant feed pressure, lubrication.
     
  9. woodchucker

    woodchucker United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    546
    Trophy Points:
    93
    City:
    Pittstown
    State:
    New Jersey

    -Return to Top-

    Tighten your gibs, align your blade square to the part, center the cutter, hone the edge. I have no problem parting with mine. I do tighten the gib screws on my compound, and I do use plenty of cutting fluid. My 9a will cut like a pro using HSS. I don't stick out much, and just keep moving the blade stickout further and further as I get deeper. A 9a is fully capable.
     
  10. woodchucker

    woodchucker United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    546
    Trophy Points:
    93
    City:
    Pittstown
    State:
    New Jersey

    -Return to Top-

    This is a religious matter. some like it high, some centered, some low.
    I found that when I went low, I crashed the lathe. The part would ride up over the blade (caused by the lifting action). I find centered, or early in the cutting a few tenths high are safe. When you get close to the center, you need to be more centered. I never go low after a few scary crashes.
     
    Bob Korves likes this.
  11. Glenn Brooks

    Glenn Brooks H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    426
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Woodinville
    State:
    Washington

    -Return to Top-

    All good advice above. One thing nobody mentioned, but might be worth considering is maybe you are using junky cut off blades? I recently bought some nice looking shinny, import blades from a reputable supplier, and they acted exactly like you describe: wouldn't cut, broke, blew up with load bangs. But they looked really swell - ground and polished to high sheen. They were just made out of the wrong type of steel.

    I had an old, NOS, English blade in my tool box, so in frustration tried that. Saw a world of difference. No problem cutting 3" material. Iam still using it. Hoping against hope it doesn't destroy itself and leave me with no cutt off tooling!

    Keep trying,
    Glenn
     
    4gsr likes this.
  12. fradish

    fradish United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    69
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    Harmony
    State:
    Pennsylvania

    -Return to Top-

    I'm starting to think this is just me, but I have not had great luck using lubrication when
    parting aluminum. It seems to me that when I am parting dry everything is fine, but when
    I lubricate with WD-40 or oil, the parting tool seems to rub rather than cut. Now maybe if
    I used a lube specifically for aluminum that would help, but I have found that I tend to have
    better luck with parting dry. Now for steel, I use oil and that seems to work fine for me.

    I also like this style cut off blade:

    1/8 x 1/2 x 4-1/2 Inch 8% Cobalt Parallel Type Cut-Off Blade-P3S
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00N405KBW/ref=cm_cr_ryp_prd_ttl_sol_11

    It has relieved sides and a convex top which helps curl the chip for me. I also like the
    wider blade (1/8") which seems to wander less on me, though as others have said it is
    important to keep as little stick out as possible. I have actually bought an additional
    parting blade holder. I keep one with very little stick out (maybe 1/2") and the other
    with maybe 1" stick out. For most of what I do I can just swap from one to the other
    as I get deeper in the cut rather than having to change the stick out, then recenter
    the tool holder to get it back on center.
     
  13. Charles Spencer

    Charles Spencer Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    963
    Trophy Points:
    93
    City:
    Worcester
    State:
    Massachusetts

    -Return to Top-

    I use a carbide insert parting tool on my SB 9A. I won't say no problems but they do work.
     
  14. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    2,329
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Victoria, Texas
    City:
    Victoria
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    You need a good cutting oil. Sorry WD-40 and lubricating oil just doesn't cut it! Oatly or what I use Mobil Metcut 766, works much better. Sharpen the end of the blade with a 3 to 5 degree bevel. This will let the part cut off without leaving a tit on it. Oh, put the lathe in back gear with that large of OD.
     
    fradish likes this.
  15. fradish

    fradish United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    69
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    Harmony
    State:
    Pennsylvania

    -Return to Top-

    Ken,

    Thanks for the advise! Next time I'll try actual cutting fluids meant for the job I am doing rather
    than just trying to reuse the lubes I have on hand. Sometimes being cheap doesn't
    actually pay. :)
     
    RandyM and 4gsr like this.

Share This Page