• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
  • Guest,  We want to wish You and Your Family a Healthy, Happy Thanksgiving! Click the "X" at the top right corner to remove this notice)
  • PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

4

Thread on a 'whatchamacallit'

3
Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!
10

tjb

Terry
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
May 3, 2017
Messages
99
Likes
33
#1
Hello, All.

A few days ago, I was trolling through a forum (no idea which one), and I read through posts on a particular thread (not a clue what subject), and came across a comment that highlighted what appeared to be a shop-made lathe attachment (beats the heck out of me what you would call it). So if any of you can identify that attachment, would you please let me know? (No, really. I'm not joking!)

Just in case you need a little more info, here's what I can offer. The purpose of the attachment was to draw the compound towards the center of rotation as the table was being moved toward the lathe chuck. It looked like a shop-made plate was mounted beneath the ways, with a pivot arm connecting the plate to the cross slide. As the table moved toward the headstock, the pivot arm drew the cross slide inward. The result was essentially a curved taper, and many readers identified the part as a 'farrus' or 'ferrus' or 'furres' or something like that, which I gathered is a fairly common part in clock making (?). There was an accompanying you-tube video in which a chunk of brass was chucked between the headstock and tailstock and this device turned a beautiful taper into it, after which the part was threaded along its contour.

Any idea where I can re-locate this post? I've searched through several posts and you-tube videos but am having no luck (senior moment). Any help would be greatly appreciated. I have a project where I suspect making such an attachment would come in handy.

I'm posting it here on 'A Beginner's Forum' because I can't think of a better place. If it should be moved, please advise.

Thanks and regards,
Terry
 

T Bredehoft

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2014
Messages
2,141
Likes
1,480
#3
That's it, how do I disconnect the crossfeed screw? Unscrew the nut screw and drop the nut?
 

Wreck™Wreck

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2014
Messages
1,919
Likes
1,463
#4
Some lathes with a straight taper attachment have telescoping cross feed lead screws, if not disconnect the screw entirely.
 

T Bredehoft

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2014
Messages
2,141
Likes
1,480
#5
I remember using a taper attachment, there was a way to disconnect the leadscrew, but it's now been since 1979, and I just don't remember. I do remember chasing threads for an oil string, tapered.
 

tjb

Terry
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
May 3, 2017
Messages
99
Likes
33
#6
It sounds like you may be referring to a device that one of the forum members made for making a clock fusee.
http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/radius-turning-contraption.62939/#post-518893
Thanks, RJ. I know I'm late on responding to you, but I'm only just now discovering I'm able to send messages on H-M again. (Evidently, some programming glitch in new software.)

That's exactly the post I was looking for. Thanks for saving me a lot more searching.

Regards.
 

gonzo

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2016
Messages
78
Likes
77
#7
Hello, All.

A few days ago, I was trolling through a forum (no idea which one), and I read through posts on a particular thread (not a clue what subject), and came across a comment that highlighted what appeared to be a shop-made lathe attachment (beats the heck out of me what you would call it). So if any of you can identify that attachment, would you please let me know? (No, really. I'm not joking!)

Just in case you need a little more info, here's what I can offer. The purpose of the attachment was to draw the compound towards the center of rotation as the table was being moved toward the lathe chuck. It looked like a shop-made plate was mounted beneath the ways, with a pivot arm connecting the plate to the cross slide. As the table moved toward the headstock, the pivot arm drew the cross slide inward. The result was essentially a curved taper, and many readers identified the part as a 'farrus' or 'ferrus' or 'furres' or something like that, which I gathered is a fairly common part in clock making (?). There was an accompanying you-tube video in which a chunk of brass was chucked between the headstock and tailstock and this device turned a beautiful taper into it, after which the part was threaded along its contour.

Any idea where I can re-locate this post? I've searched through several posts and you-tube videos but am having no luck (senior moment). Any help would be greatly appreciated. I have a project where I suspect making such an attachment would come in handy.

I'm posting it here on 'A Beginner's Forum' because I can't think of a better place. If it should be moved, please advise.

Thanks and regards,
Terry
That article was in the september/october 2017 issue of home shop machinest.
 
[6]
5 [7]