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This Followed Me Home

cjtoombs

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#31
I suspect the hole in the column and the coresponding bearing support in the knee may have been for a lever operation rack and pinion to use the machine for production. It may have been an option and the castings included provisions for it on all mills, whether they got the screw type knee or the lever type one. I have an atlas mill that has a rack bolted to the column, but it was sold with screw raising knee, not the lever one.
 

ThunderDog

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#32
Wow, appreciate the continued feedback. I got it all done. Youtube videos will be up in another day or two. I'll make sure to put them in this thread for easy reference.

Cjtoombs, I tend to agree with your idea that those castings were for some optional setups.

benmychree, if you're right about a vertical attachment. Wow, that would be super cool to discover!

So, my current setup consists of several pulleys and the use of a treadmill motor. The way I set it up is giving me about 28 RPM to 280 RPM's at the spindle. I'm assuming it will be ran slower more often than any other speed. Of course, there are other variables such as feedrate, material type, etc.
 

cjtoombs

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#33
ThunderDog, What size cutters can you use on it? I expect you probably won't be able to use anything larger than 4" without hitting the overarm support bar, so you should base your low speed on the size HSS cutters that you can fit on the machine. For a 4" cutter in mild steel you are looking at about 100 RPM. I would look to something more like 50-500 RPM, that way you could do some harder steel if needed. Another option would be 100-1000 RPM. For that range you could just use smaller diameter cutters for harder steels and it would give you a decent RPM range to use regular end mills if you wanted to cut a slot in the side of a part. Neat little machine, whatever it is.
 

jpfabricator

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#34
A plus is you got a carriage bolt and a washer out of the refurb! [emoji56] [emoji1]

Sent from somwhere in east Texas by Jake!
 

ThunderDog

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#35
Ok, I'm gonna throw a curve ball here. I just found a Atlas Horizontal mill with power feed and a vertical attachment. Not much tooling with it. Seller says the vertical attachment was made by a local machine shop. What would you do?
Milling%20machine_zpsk7xkhkbp.jpg
 

cjtoombs

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#36
Depends on the prices. The Atlas is a pretty solid little mill. Does it have the arbor and support for horizontal milling? Those will set you back 150-250 to purchase (usualy you find the arbor with no spacers and have to spend more on them). Vice? The tooling it has (and doesn't have) should be factored into what you would be willing to pay for it. Power feed is awfuly nice.
 

ThunderDog

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#37
Update:
Part 2 (Electronics heavy, so machinist types might skip this)

Part 3 (The more exciting part, sort of.)
 

brino

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#38
Hey Thunderdog,

In the second video above you asked for alternatives to all those pulleys and belts.
How about a worm gear reduction?
They offer a big speed reduction in one step and most of it is enclosed.
It could be from the scrap yard from an old washing machine, or a differential from a riding mower, or ????

Typically the input and output shafts will be at 90 deg. to each-other, so the motor location would change.

-brino
 

ThunderDog

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#39
Thought I would post an update.

First, I must have an illness. It's called machinecollectiontitus. Infection is easily onset when exposed to classified ads, Craigslist, or eBay. Side effects include a reduction in wallet size and tirades from your spouse.
I never intended it, but I may now consider parting ways with the mill I just finished. Who knows, maybe I'll try to keep it too.:grin:
So here it is. I suppose I will shift over to the Atlas forum after this. So, join me over there if you want to see progress.

Atlas%20Mill%203_zps16hprtlf.jpg
 

projectnut

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#40
That nameplate is obviously a dealer's plate that is it was put on by the dealer that originally sold the machine, nothing to do with the manufacturer; these used to be very common, not so much any more.
Very rough castings suggest to me a likely World War Two vintage when production was of greater importance than nicety.
I would concur with it being the name of the retailer. A little research came up with an ad on page 141 in the 1922 Manufacturers Record for an air compressor for sale by the same company in Philadelphia:

https://books.google.com/books?id=Il8-AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA141&lpg=PA141&dq=delta+equipment+company+philadelphia+pa&source=bl&ots=NhB3Fu_KNB&sig=XRdSTC37PHPKGJIt35qT4GPW6Bs&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiOkoXIssvOAhUKSiYKHaPIAM0Q6AEISzAJ#v=onepage&q=delta equipment company philadelphia pa&f=false
 

ThunderDog

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#41
I FIGURED IT OUT!!!
SOLVED(6/14/17)

The mill on page 1 of this thread is a Jefferson Milling Machine. I found it by chance when I was looking at some pictures to make my own dividing head. Here is the photo I found and looked all over that website with no mention of the milling machine. I took a glance at the url and saw the word jefferson. Typed that in and VOILA!! Also, found two other images from another forum of the same machine. According to the unnamed forum member, it uses a 1C collet.
 

tew45

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#42
It looks like a Jefferson bench mill. I have a Jefferson mounted on a cast iron base/cabinet . The motor is mounted on the inside the case with the pulley pointing rearward therefore it needs an open frame motor like some older washing machine motors. My Jefferson uses the Cincinnati Monoset collets.
 

brino

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#43
It looks like a Jefferson bench mill.
Hello @tew45
Thanks for posting!
I have never heard of a Jefferson mill, and there's almost nothing on "the net" that I could find.
Could you provide a couple pictures of yours?
Thanks,
-brino
 

tew45

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#47
Here is my Jefferson with a couple of Monoset collets the collet on the right is for another application. When I can I will photograph the motor. A standard frame motor would not fit into the hollow place reserved for it in the rear of the unit. I thought I had a white elephant until I remembered an open frame 1/2 hp motor was used on some washing machines. I pulled one out of an old washer and it fit perfectly. I am truing to come up with a vertical unit but no luck so far. I have been using it as a vertical machine by mounting an end mill in the collet. This methods works but leaves a lot to be desired. There aren't many of these mills around and so far TD's is the third one I have seen. It is a very sturdy machine even with its size limitations.
 

ThunderDog

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#48
Tew45, I believe it was your pic that I saw on another forum and confirmed what I had found. Can you provide a little more detail about the taper, pics of that power feed, anything really. Measurements of the taper would be MOST APPRECIATED.

I too converted the Jefferson to vertical mill(YouTube video coming in two weeks), without making any permanent changes to the machine. Either my Leeson 1hp motor is not enough or I'm expecting more from the machine
It doesn't have my trust when compared to the Atlas using the same sized cutter. Of course, the Atlas has backgears and my Jefferson is a variable DC motor directly driven by a single belt.
 

ThunderDog

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#49
It's been a while, but this is my journey through the conversion of the Jefferson mill to a vertical milling machine.

Let me know what you think.
 

Mark_W

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#50
I think... I would cut the slot with a hacksaw at this point.

Actually, I am another happy owner of a Jefferson mill. Mine also has a bastardized motor-belt drive setup. Someone also installed a 10 pitch leadscrew on the y axis but left the original dial. Or was it 8 pitch; whatever, they don't match. Took me a while to figure out what was going on. Thought the arbor was flexing or something.

Looking forward to the rest of your build.

Mark
 
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