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The frame for my lathe

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Aukai

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#1
Making the frame to mount my lathe. Sorry no pictures.
Long morning, 25 feet of surface rust removal x 4 sides, and the radius of the corners(2x3x1/4"). The 45* cuts need to be dressed, close but not perfect. I'm surprised no one saw the cob web, and dust cloud from Kauai. I pipe fitted a whole roll cage, and coped the tubing for my car, it was not as hard as square tubing. I'm trying to fit an X inside of the frame, and it kicked my butt. The corners are 90s but not an equal sided square, I had to draw it on the garage floor to see what I was doing.
. 70*/20* but from 90* of the X, which became -20*(70*) from 90, and +70* from 90(20*). Good thing I found a trusty dusty protractor. My saw does not go to 70* so that will be interesting to figure out tomorrow. Some people do Sudoku.... I'm sure for some people this is elementary, but I had to think. Which is a good thing, everything on the ambulance is automatic, training, and instinct. :confused 3:
 

NortonDommi

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#3
If your saw cuts from 90* to 45* you can cut any angle in between. Just turn your material over to get the right angle in the right plane. There is also the handy cut-off blade on the angle grinder too.
 

Aukai

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#4
Well I got my 70* cut, and have the piece fitted in. Now do I need to finish the X, or do you think I have enough rigidity as it sits now?



 

Silverbullet

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#7
Box steel welded in the corners is more then strong enough . If you wanted to just weld some x 45 degree gussets in the corners.
 

Aukai

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#9
OK, the welding is done, I did not like any of the gusset ideas I had, so I finished the X. Now, where to mount the wheels. They could go on the outside corners, or mount them more inboard to minimize the span. 7 1/2" in is the easiest to do for inboard mounting, the cabinets are 13 1/2" across the front on each side.

1118171856_zpsfdgsuvtu.jpg

1118171858_zpsrt37lyzd.jpg
 

firestopper

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#12
Your just making a rolling base for your machine correct?
If so, I would recommend anchor bolts with enough thread to level machine ( between the machine and base). The castors next to leveling/anchors leaving enough access. You could weld the anchor bolts from the bottom leaving a clean threaded shaft protruding upward with a leveling nut between the base and machine. If you do it this way, you would need to drill through the box section and run the bolt from the bottom to weld the head.
Post up a detail photo/s of the bottom level/ mounts of your machine. There many ways to skin a cat, but simple is king. The structural tube your using is plenty rigid, but take your time with the welding to control distortion. Last question, what is your target finished hight? This answer is important for choosing the anchoring method used. Right now your 3" taller with material+castor height (including flange plate) +leveling nut thickness.

Mahalo,
Paco
 

Aukai

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#13
Your just making a rolling base for your machine correct?
If so, I would recommend anchor bolts with enough thread to level machine ( between the machine and base). The castors next to leveling/anchors leaving enough access. You could weld the anchor bolts from the bottom leaving a clean threaded shaft protruding upward with a leveling nut between the base and machine. If you do it this way, you would need to drill through the box section and run the bolt from the bottom to weld the head.
Post up a detail photo/s of the bottom level/ mounts of your machine. There many ways to skin a cat, but simple is king. The structural tube your using is plenty rigid, but take your time with the welding to control distortion. Last question, what is your target finished hight? This answer is important for choosing the anchoring method used. Right now your 3" taller with material+castor height (including flange plate) +leveling nut thickness.

Mahalo,
Paco[/QUOTE

That made me smile this morning. The frame is on leveling castors. One of my thoughts was to drill, and tap the box frame, then use shims under the stand for adjustments there. I have automotive alignment shims for that if needed. If the lathe it's self needs tweaking, my thoughts were to use feeler gauge leaves under the bed. Will this get the job done, or is the bolt adjuster better

Gracias
Mike
 

firestopper

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#14
Hi Mike,

Just my thoughts, but if you were to level the machine to the base via leveling bolts it would eliminate fiddling with shims making it quicker to dial in as well as making fine adjustments later.
The leveling castors would be used to make up for an uneven floor providing a solid mount. If you think of a lathe aboard a ship that pitches and rolls underway, so long as the bed twist is neutral the machine doesn't care and cuts correctly. Instead of drilling /tapping into the .250" wall (too thin for threading), you could turn threaded bushing that are shouldered to sit in a drilled hole and weld them a bit to simply to hold them from turning while adjusting the nuts.
Something like 1"diameter on the large end turned down to say .875" with a .250" thick shoulder. (these dimension depend on the size of threaded rod/bolt you would use.
Something along these lines but with the longer threaded portion inside the tubing:
IMG_0053.JPG
Not much weld needed as its only prevents the threaded bushing from turning.
Keep the top portion thinner and more of the threaded portion inside the tube.
In this application, we needed clearance on the underside so the opposite was done, but you get the picture.
IMG_0055.JPG
So think of this as a cutaway and upside down to what you would require. Remember to keep the shoulder thickness to a minimum so you don't keep adding hight to your machine. Once level, you jamb nut to the bushing, jamb nut under the lathe and secure your machine to the threaded stud.
IMG_0078.JPG
Man, I hope I didn't confuse you. If you need a sketch, I'm happy to draw one up and include a photo for clarification but let me know what size rod/bolt you will use if you want to pursue this application. Skip the shims brah.
Mahalo,
Paco
 

Aukai

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#15
Hi Mike,

Just my thoughts, but if you were to level the machine to the base via leveling bolts it would eliminate fiddling with shims making it quicker to dial in as well as making fine adjustments later.
The leveling castors would be used to make up for an uneven floor providing a solid mount. If you think of a lathe aboard a ship that pitches and rolls underway, so long as the bed twist is neutral the machine doesn't care and cuts correctly. Instead of drilling /tapping into the .250" wall (too thin for threading), you could turn threaded bushing that are shouldered to sit in a drilled hole and weld them a bit to simply to hold them from turning while adjusting the nuts.
Something like 1"diameter on the large end turned down to say .875" with a .250" thick shoulder. (these dimension depend on the size of threaded rod/bolt you would use.
Something along these lines but with the longer threaded portion inside the tubing:
View attachment 247369
Not much weld needed as its only prevents the threaded bushing from turning.
Keep the top portion thinner and more of the threaded portion inside the tube.
In this application, we needed clearance on the underside so the opposite was done, but you get the picture.
View attachment 247370
So think of this as a cutaway and upside down to what you would require. Remember to keep the shoulder thickness to a minimum so you don't keep adding hight to your machine. Once level, you jamb nut to the bushing, jamb nut under the lathe and secure your machine to the threaded stud.
View attachment 247371
Man, I hope I didn't confuse you. If you need a sketch, I'm happy to draw one up and include a photo for clarification but let me know what size rod/bolt you will use if you want to pursue this application. Skip the shims brah.
Mahalo,
Paco
OK, thank you for the pictures. Gotta go do some measuring, and see where the holes line up. Nice welds, I'm not there yet.
 

Aukai

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#16
I ran out of time today, had to clean up my contribution to disorganization in my part of the garage. We're heading to America on Tuesday for the holiday. The lathe is on the frame, with the holes marked. When we get back I'll pull it back off, and install the leveling bolts. The drip tray is at 36". It does roll very nicely....

1119171702_zpsyhv04raa.jpg
 

firestopper

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#18
Thanks Dave,
Been practicing for north of three decades. I now require cheaters to weld/read and find my wee weeo_O. OK, not really the latter.;)
 
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