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Taking the CNC Plunge

Discussion in 'PRECISION-MATTHEWS' started by TomS, Aug 6, 2014.

  1. jumps4

    jumps4 Global Moderator Staff Member Active Member

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    you jumper them at the plug just like X and Y, they will fit in the connector housing.
    Steve
     
  2. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks Steve. I didn't think you could solder two wires to one terminal. Ill give it a try tomorrow.

    I was going to attach a couple of shots of the X and Y axis and limit switches wired to the breakout board. I also have the UC-100 and the Bob wired to the USB hub but the pictures I took aren't very good. I'll take more tomorrow.

    Tom S
     
  3. jbolt

    jbolt United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Tom, I soldered a short pigtail to each (+) pin on the connector and then twisted and soldered them together with the single wire to the BOB. Shrink wrap and zip tie to protect the bare ends.

    Jay
     
  4. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Good idea! I tried soldering two wires to one of the plug pins and it didn't work very well. I melted the plastic piece that separates the pins. Could be because I'm using 18 gauge wire and the pins take something smaller, like 20 or 22 gauge. Tomorrow I need to find another plug and some smaller gauge wire.

    Tom S
     
  5. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Got the Z axis wired to the BoB today. With that out of the way I believe I'm ready to test the motors. I've got 220v power to the power supplies through the SSR with the circuit protected with 4A slow blow fuses. The drivers are wired to the power supplies. The driver dip switches are set. The BoB is wired to the drivers and connected to the USB hub for 5v power. The UC-100 is also connected to the USB hub and the hub is connected to my laptop. Still have to install the UC-100 software. Cooling fans are working. Limit/home switches are mounted and wired to the BoB. Limit stops will be set once the motors are tested. Mach 3 is loaded and the configuration file is installed.

    Have I overlooked anything? I don't want to smoke anything on start up. Any tests I should run before powering up? What tests should I run to verify that the system is responding correctly?

    Here's a few pics of my electronics wiring. I still have to tidy it up a bit.

    Tom S

    20150421_163335.jpg 20150421_163421.jpg 20150421_163639_Richtone(HDR).jpg

    20150421_162237.jpg
     
  6. jbolt

    jbolt United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    It looks like you have 110v through the SSR, your post says 220v? What are your power supplies set to? 110v or 220v?

    Where is the 110v supply into the SSR coming from and what size breaker is it on?

    If you are concerned about powering up I would disconnect the drives from the power supplies and remove all but one fuse. Power up each PS one at a time and check the output voltage. Then hookup and test one drive & motor at a time.

    Jay
     
  7. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Jay - Thanks for your questions and input. I have two power feeds into the electronics enclosure. The junction block next to the fuse holder and SSR is fed with 220v. The other junction block next to the X axis power supply is fed with 110v. I've set the X and Y axis power supplies to 220v. The Z axis PS is voltage sensing so there is no manual setting. The black wire is the 220v "Line/Load" feeding the SSR. 220v out of the SSR is feeding the fuse block. The "neutral" in is feeding the junction block. The terminals on the other side of the SSR are being fed with 5v DC. Each power supply is protected with a 4A slow blow fuse. Hope this is clear and not confusing.

    Tom S
     
  8. jbolt

    jbolt United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    So if I understand you correctly, the black, white & green three-wire coming into the SSR, terminal block and ground lug are (black = 110v, white = 110v and green = ground) and you are switching one leg of the 220v circuit?

    Jay
     
  9. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    No, I have two separate power feeds into the enclosure: one 220v and one 110v circuits. The black, white and green wires coming into the SSR, terminal block and ground lug is 220v. I measured the power across the SSR when I powered up the 5v DC transformer and I get 220V at the SSR. The load side is protected by the fuse block (one 4A fuse per power supply) and the neutral side are the white wires going to each of the power supplies. And the green is grounded at the lug. 110v power comes into the other junction block (next to the X axis power supply). This circuit feeds the fans, the 5v DC transformer for the BoB power and SSR control signal, and the computer.

    Sorry if I'm not being clear. I'm electrically challenged and may be using terms and phrases that don't accurately describe what I've done.

    Tom S
     
  10. jbolt

    jbolt United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    No worries. I'm pretty straight with standard residential wiring having been a general contractor for the past 25 years but I am also less comfortable with electronics or high voltage wiring.

    Sorry if I am presenting what you may already know but I want to make sure we are on the same page.

    Standard residential wiring is the US is typically as follows:

    Three wires into the main service from the Utility company: Line 1 (110v), Line 2 (110v), Ground

    Typical home circuit.
    110vac (black wire = Line 1 (hot), (white wire = neutral) ( green or bare wire = ground). 110v is measured across the hot and neutral.
    220v (3-wire), (black wire = Line 1 (hot), (Red wire = Line 2 (hot) ( green or bare wire = ground). 220v is measured across Line 1 & Line 2, or 110v from line 1 or 2 to ground.
    220v (4-wire), (black wire = Line 1 (hot), (Red wire = Line 2 (hot) (white wire = neutral) ( green or bare wire = ground)

    Where I am getting confused is when you say you have 220v to the SSR on a single wire? On your power supplies, for 220v, terminals L & N would connect to Line 1 and Line 2 . There would be no neutral, just ground.

    Jay
     
  11. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I'll take a close up picture of the 220v circuit and post it. Maybe that will clear it up.

    Tom S
     
  12. jbolt

    jbolt United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Tom, it occurred to me that the 220v side may be for 220v/50hz single wire which is a European standard. Are you sure you can run the power supply on US 220v/60hz?

    Jay
     
  13. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Here are some close up pictures of the relay and power supply wiring. I was incorrect when I said I had 220v across the relay when it was energized with 5v DC (actually 4.06v DC). Don't know where that came from. The relay doesn't appear to be closing on the AC side because I don't have continuity through the two terminals when the relay is energized.

    The 5v dc control signal to the relay is fed by the transformer that is located to the right of the fuse block. I have assumed that the red wire is + and the black wire -. When I power up the transformer the red indicator light on the relay lights up. That leads me to believe the transformer is wired to the relay correctly.

    The black wire connected to the #1 relay terminal and the white wire connected to the junction block left of the fuse block is my 220v input into the enclosure. The green ground wire is not shown but it is connected to the grounding lug. What is odd is I have 110-120 volts measured at the power supply line/load and neutral terminals to ground. I can understand the neutral terminal showing voltage because of the way I have the circuit wired but I don't understand why I'm getting a voltage reading between the line/load terminal and ground.

    20150422_171226_Richtone(HDR).jpg
    This picture shows the 220v wiring to one of the power supplies. The black wire is load/line and comes from the fuse block. The white wire is what I call neutral and comes from the junction block in the first picture. The green/ground wire goes to the grounding lug.
    20150422_171302_Richtone(HDR).jpg

    So I'm at a loss on how to wire this circuit. Any direction you can give me is appreciated.

    Tom S
     
  14. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

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    Without a fuse in the holder I would expect to see voltage to ground on both terminals because the Triac in the relay leaks a very small amount of current with 220 volt power connected.

    Without the 220v power connected, and a load on the relay you won't see continuity on the relay, it requires a current flow to turn on. Just checking with an ohmmeter across the unconnected terminals won't tell you anything. The ohmmeter won't draw enough current to turn on the Triac.
    .
    .
     
  15. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks for the clarification. Still trying to figure out how to wire this circuit. The way it's currently wired I'm not getting 220v out of the relay.

    Tom S
     
  16. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

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    Are you measuring to ground or what you are calling neutral? I would expect 120 to ground, and 240 to neutral assuming the ''neutral'' is actually the other leg of the 240.
     
  17. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I'm calling the white wire neutral. I get 220v measuring voltage between the black and white wires and 120v when measuring between each wire and ground. Does this make sense? I'm by no means an electrician.

    Tom S
     
  18. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

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    Yup, that makes sense. That relay won't turn on until you put a load on it, in other words put a power supply fuse in and try it. SSRs are a little strange in the way they work relative to a electro-mechanical relay.

    I think I read earlier in this thread that you are supplying this panel with both 240 and 120 on separate circuits. Using white for one leg of the 240 could be a bit confusing. Normally 240 would be black and red. White would normally be the neutral in the 120 volt circuit.
     
  19. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I hear you about the red wire. I had a short 10ga 120v extension cord that I used for the 220v power supply. That's how I ended up with a white wire in the circuit.

    Thanks to you and jbolt for helping me through this. Tomorrow I'll power up the system and see if the motors turn.

    Tom S
     
  20. jbolt

    jbolt United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Jim,

    Are you familiar with these types of power supplies and the 110v / 220v switch? I'm just wondering if they will accept how we (USA) wire 220v vs the European system or maybe they accept both?

    Jay
     
  21. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

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    Yes, they will take 24o as we wire it and the European method.. These are a pretty standard universal power supply.
     
  22. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Well today was not a good day. I powered up the system after loading the UC-100 software and no motor movement. Apparently I'm not getting power to the power supplies. The light on the BoB lights so I know it has power. The relay is getting 4.06 volts on the control signal side and there is 220V on the AC inlet side of the relay but it appears no power out to the fuse panel. Have I wired the 220v circuit correctly? Could it be a faulty relay? I have a spare so I'll change it in the morning. If that doesn't solve the problem I can bypass the relay. The only problem with that is I also lose on/off switching capability. Could it be a configuration issue? Any other thoughts?

    Tom S
     
  23. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

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    Those power supplies have a LED in them that comes on when powered. Does the LED on the relay come on?

    I assume it's wired something like this?

    STEPPER.jpg
     
  24. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Yep. That's how I have it wired. The PS light does not come on but the light on the relay is on.
     
  25. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

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    I would jump out the relay and then turn the power on and see what happens. That would tell you if the relay is not turning on. 4.6 volts may not be enough to turn it on. I know it says 3-24VDC but you never know. If you have a 12VDC wall wart, you might try that.
     
  26. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I had a 15vdc transformer originally installed but changed it out for the 5vdc currently installed to power the BoB. I can easily plug it in to power the relay and see if that works. If not I'll bypass the relay.

    Thanks for your help.

    Tom S
     
  27. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Success!!! I bypassed the relay and the power supplies are now powered up and motors turn in both directions. What was interesting is when I changed out the 5vdc transformer for a 12vdc transformer the light on the relay did not come on. Wondering if the relays I have are correct for the installation. I'll try one of my spare relays to determine if the relay is bad.

    Tom S
     
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  28. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I changed out the relay and still have the same problem; no AC power through the relay. Digging through a pile of papers I found the attached wiring schematic that came with my relays. I'm confused by this diagram because it shows a connection to the #4 terminal and load. Is this correct?

    I mounted the motors and ran a few tests. The X and Y axis motors run fine. The Z axis travels down but won't travel up. It makes noise in the up direction but no ball screw movement. The coupling is tight. Not sure what's going on with this because I was able to lower and raise the Z axis with my battery powered drill with little effort. I would think the 4200 oz in stepper motor would have more power than the drill.

    I also tested the limit switches and nothing tripped. First thing I need to do is double check the wiring. I wired them in series but considering all the wiring I've done on this project I'm not surprised that I might have made a mistake.

    I've also attached some pics of a few configuration screens. Maybe it's a setting that is the cause of the Z axis motor and limit switch issues.

    I'm making progress but slowly.

    Tom S

    20150423_095938.jpg

    20150423_095952.jpg

    20150423_100006.jpg

    20150423_100017.jpg

    20150423_100051.jpg

    20150423_100115.jpg
     

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  29. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

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    '

    I don't think you want a connection between the load and terminal 4 in this case. That would be feeding 240V to the 5 volt, I suspect that would let the magic smoke out of several components.

    The PDF shows a power source of 3 to 32 VDC, driving both the relay and the load.
     
  30. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

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    What does your Z-axis profile look like? It kind of sounds like the accel is set a bit high. What is your step resolution set to? They seem to work better at 1/4 step or higher.
     

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