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Substitute for Gits Oiler

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cathead

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#1
Missing several Gits oilers, I fabricated several out of some rifle shells, 30-06 and 44 mag I think it was.
The 30-06 shell was cut off at a 45 degree angle and carefully silver soldered back together to form
a right angled oiler. The cover for the oiler is a 44 Magnum shell swaged out a bit for a good fit. Maybe
not quite as nice as the Gits but functional and with no expense. I suppose some would say it is a
red neck type repair but I kinda like it. :)





 

terrywerm

HM Shop Foreman
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Oct 21, 2012
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#2
The age old saying that "necessity is the mother of invention" holds true yet once again!
 

Bob Korves

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#4
How does the oil get past the primers?
 

cathead

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#13
What did you use for the wick inside to slow down the oil?
My Gits oilers didn't have anything to slow down the oil flow but in the past I have cut some round pieces of felt and lined the
tube pushing the felt in a ways so there is room for the felt on top. Packing the felt in there slows down the flow of course so
it can be a trial and error thing.
.
 

cathead

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#14
Here's a little useful information on making some ammunition style oilers. Go to a shooting range and
collect up a bunch of various spent cartridges. (I save brass as occasionally I will need to melt down
for a project). If you have an inventory of various diameters, you can usually find a necked down diameter
that fits your oiler hole. I generally cut off the unwanted portion of the shell in the lathe using a 5c collet.
Hack saws generally are too coarse to cut nicely and make a rough edge on the parts.
Sometimes a little machining is needed to fit on an appropriately sized cover or stretch out a shell a little
for a nice fit. It keeps the chips out of your machines and looks really nice if you keep the brass polished up.
The bottom of a brass shell is a lot thicker so one can machine the cover to fit inside the bottom part by
machining off enough material till it fits inside as shown in the photo.

 
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