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Stoning, and stones.

Discussion in 'A BEGINNER'S FORUM (Learn How To Machine Here!)' started by Moderatemixed, Aug 24, 2017.

  1. Moderatemixed

    Moderatemixed Canada Active Member Active Member

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    Hey everybody,

    I am brand new to machining and am in the middle of refurbishing a second Atlas 10F. Last winter I did my first lathe and I am correcting any shortcomings in this second. I set the bed out to be reground and it has come back in beautiful condition. I see on YouTube a number of guys "stoning" lathe beds, milling tables, rotary tables etc. Would someone please give me the low down on stoning. I have a bunch of stones that came in my tool chest when I bought it but I don't know what "grit" they are and what "grit/coarseness" to use, or that I should use one at all, or why to use them. And should I now stone the ways of a beautifully ground lathe bed? Any guidance is appreciated.
     
  2. T Bredehoft

    T Bredehoft Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    No. Your logic is working. Slow and cautious is the way to go.
     
  3. f350ca

    f350ca Canada Active User Active Member

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    When something gets dropped on a table or way, the resulting mark creates a low spot where the impact occurs. The metal flows from the low spot, to create a ridge. Careful stoning will remove the ridge, leaving the low spot below the original flat surface.
    When scraping a surface you create a microscopic rough surface that can hold oil. After scraping careful stoning removes the high points.
    On a ground surface there should be no high points, so no reason to touch it with a stone.

    Greg
     
    Bob Korves likes this.

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