• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
  • PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

spoon feed the noob....

BogusSVO

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2017
Messages
43
Likes
34
#1
Well I been here a few weeks now poking around, reading and watching some youtube vids.
It helped me decide what machine to get, I went with the Precision Matthews 12x36 lathe and the PM 932 mill

Now the lathe I am used to running are brake lathes and for mills , becos and van norman, I come from an automotive machinist background, so these are my first industrial/fabrication machines. So I will have an abundance of questions once they arrive.

I hear many speak of having a "Machinist Handbook" so Ill invest in one
Is this the correct one to get? or is there a better one?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/American-Ma...894849?hash=item3d378b8281:g:fGwAAOSw~CFY5Rp-

Next I did read about 2 different machinist that have some good youtube vids that new guys should watch and take note of. But the names escape me now.

What else should I focus some time and energy on while I wait on the equipment to show up and while I get it in place and set up so I'll be able to start making a few chips in short order?

I should have enough inside, outside mics, dial indicators and tools of that sort.
so a basic list of tooling, and other reference material or any other helpful suggestions would be welcomed.

TIA
Dale
BogusSVO
 

Hawkeye

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jun 17, 2011
Messages
1,769
Likes
399
#2
Welcome to the addiction. I think the book you've most commonly heard about is Machinery's Handbook. You can sometimes find them on eBay for reasonable prices. New ones are north of $120, but a 25th or so edition will give you more than enough info for a lot less cash.
 

kvt

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2014
Messages
1,653
Likes
724
#3
Welcome, and glad you are here. Have not been here long myself. mrpete222 is one of the good ones for some videos to watch, and go from there. I would also start to collect a bit of scrap metal to practice on. You can also make things out of the scraps, but this way you are learning on stuff that cost a bit less and is not stuff you purchase for a main project. There are also some books, and sites with projects that you can do, Harold Hall http://www.homews.co.uk/index.html and somewhere on here are a few threads about basic tooling that you may want to get, Such as grinder to grind your HSS tools with, Stones to finish the ground tools, etc Again welcome to the site.
 

Dave Paine

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
May 10, 2014
Messages
392
Likes
278
#5
There are many machinist YouTube channels. A search for metal lathe or milling machine will give long lists.

Someone already mentioned MrPete222. He used to be a shop teacher so is used to explaining things. He has hundreds of "how-to" video.

Another video channel with good explanations is "ThatLazyMachinist". He is thorough in explaining, but may take too long in some explanation.

I like Dale Derrys "Metal Tips and Tricks" channel, which he now seems to call "Build Something Cool". A mix of how-to and project videos.

I also like Keith Ruckers channel, VintageMachinery.org. A mix of how-to and restoration videos which I find interesting even if I never will restore a Monarch 16 lathe such as the one he is presently restoring.
 

BogusSVO

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2017
Messages
43
Likes
34
#6
Thanks all!

Mrpete222, Ill get him loaded up
Ill get the book

For scrap to tinker with, thats a non issue, There is a huge welding fab shop around the corner from my shop, n they hook me up on the cheap with cut offs

About as soon as I get the lathe plugged in, Ill need to make a few sets of adapter bushings for a block decking fixture I bought so I can get that into use.
 

Z2V

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
May 10, 2017
Messages
198
Likes
152
#7
Also check out Joe Pieczynski on YouTube. He has many interesting videos
 

BogusSVO

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2017
Messages
43
Likes
34
#8
I been trying to watch all the vids Joe P has out, very informative.

I picked up a copy of the Machinery's Handbook,25th edition, along with a little book Joe P made mention of, Illinois Toolmakers Trig hand book.
 

retrojoe

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2017
Messages
15
Likes
41
#9
I'm going to vote for This Old Tony as far as you tube channels to watch. Very entertaining, the videos have a professional look to them and Tony is a hobbyist but with a solid skill set.
 

T. J.

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2015
Messages
175
Likes
175
#11
The first book you mentioned - The American Machinist's Handbook by Colvin & Stanley - is a good one as well.
 

BogusSVO

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2017
Messages
43
Likes
34
#12
Ok, I have my machines, and I about have them cleaned up and adjusted.

My next question is.... What is the common tooling to have such as V blocks, parallels, shims and such

I have a fair amount of the Basics, like Mic's, calipers, drill bits, some reamers (goodson valve guide reamers)
Also I got the basic tooling kits that PM offers with the equipment.

I mainly deal with guys in the automotive world, so I doubt I need aerospace quality.

So I am mainly asking for a check list of sorts so I do not get caught short in the middle of trying to do something.

I am a true new guy to industrial/fabrication machining.
 

brino

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2014
Messages
2,843
Likes
2,618
#13
Here's a few existing threads on that subject:

http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/some-useful-lathe-tools.51/
http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/suggestions-on-tooling-for-new-machinist.36342/#post-309480
http://www.hobby-machinist.com/thre...tools-ideas-of-what-to-buy.62043/#post-511128
http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/lathes-and-tools-what-are-the-essentials.50616/

For other stuff think about the jobs you'll do, then think thru the entire job.....for automotive, maybe:
-boring head,
-fly cutter or face mill,
-piston ring compressor
-feeler gauges
-taps and dies

for non-machining related automotive jobs:
-valve spring compressor
-slide hammer
-various pullers
-ball-joint separator
-bearing separator
-flaring tools
-assortment of thread repair inserts

-brino
 

BogusSVO

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2017
Messages
43
Likes
34
#14
Thinks brino, the links are a great bit of help!

The rest of the list, I have that covered! LOL,

I was asking for the lathe and mill that I just recently added to my shop.
 

Breachan

Swarf
Registered Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2017
Messages
1
Likes
1
#16
Thanks all!

Mrpete222, Ill get him loaded up
Ill get the book

For scrap to tinker with, thats a non issue, There is a huge welding fab shop around the corner from my shop, n they hook me up on the cheap with cut offs

About as soon as I get the lathe plugged in, Ill need to make a few sets of adapter bushings for a block decking fixture I bought so I can get that into use.
Hi guys! I'm new to the forum, new to running a lathe, and totally out of my element. My question: How do I approach a machine shop for drop? The reason I ask is that I am an accountant. I don't have callused hands, I don't know the lingo, etc. I can't waltz into a machine shop and appear as if I fit in. How do I approach a machine shop for drop without getting laughed out of the place, or getting offered drop as long as I buy some blinker fluid?
Thanks for your input, (sorry about latching onto a current thread)
Larry
 

grumpygator

Gatekeeper
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Sep 18, 2012
Messages
1,150
Likes
824
#17
Breachan,
In your situation I would call first and ask...Make friends over the phone...Then meet and greet...**G**
 

Nels

Founder/Mechanic
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2010
Messages
4,883
Likes
829
#18
I'd be real honest. "I'm a lawyer, but I love working with my hands. I like getting dirty. Can I slide on a pair of overalls and come see what you guys do?"

You sure came to the right place. Check out the members' location. and see if there is anyone else on here near you. With 21,700 members, there might be. (Member map going to be installed as soon as ready).
 

BogusSVO

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2017
Messages
43
Likes
34
#19
If you go in the morning , grab a 6 pack of cheap breakfast briskets.. if you go about lunch time, a bag of dollar burgers go a long ways in greasing the wheels of making buddies. Be upfront, be honest, and give a firm handshake.
 
Container Above bottom breadcrumb