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Spinning Tops

intjonmiller

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#31
I was referring to boxes of powder in different colors, including gloss black, metallic black, several kinds of bronze, and numerous formulations of "clear", no two of which gave the same results (let alone "clear is clear").

That definitely looks good from here, in a small photo on my phone. Hard to judge without really seeing it, but it's definitely better than what I had seen before. My point, though, was that it's very easy for a clear powder coat to come out bad, spoiling the quality of the work it was meant to protect. It is a very delicate process and difficult to get a workpiece covered evenly without completely caking it in a relatively thick layer of plastic. That's what I really liked about the dipped-in-thin-lacquer approach: easy to get a very consistent coat, with predictable finish, not to mention the ease of doing it on the benchtop without any special equipment.
 

RandyM

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#32
I was referring to boxes of powder in different colors, including gloss black, metallic black, several kinds of bronze, and numerous formulations of "clear", no two of which gave the same results (let alone "clear is clear").

That definitely looks good from here, in a small photo on my phone. Hard to judge without really seeing it, but it's definitely better than what I had seen before. My point, though, was that it's very easy for a clear powder coat to come out bad, spoiling the quality of the work it was meant to protect. It is a very delicate process and difficult to get a workpiece covered evenly without completely caking it in a relatively thick layer of plastic. That's what I really liked about the dipped-in-thin-lacquer approach: easy to get a very consistent coat, with predictable finish, not to mention the ease of doing it on the benchtop without any special equipment.
Actually, I have had no issues of discoloration on the clear powder coat. And yes, clear is clear, no color or tint. And also, I have found the clear is probably the easiest to do and in thinner coats than the color. I guess we just have different experiences in powder coating.

Sorry gang, I guess we derailed this thread a little.

Now back to your regularly scheduled program.
 

rwm

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#34
Thanks Robert, I enjoyed that!
-brino
It's true. I may seek treatment. First I have to invest in better tooling.
ALso I mentioned gold plating. It looks like that would be painful since I would have to nickel plate first and then gold plate. I may just let it tarnish. It is 85,5,5,5 brass. The clear coat and wax ideas are good a well. I just don't want to see scratches that are the only places that gets tarnished.
R
 

intjonmiller

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#35
Actually, I have had no issues of discoloration on the clear powder coat. And yes, clear is clear, no color or tint. And also, I have found the clear is probably the easiest to do and in thinner coats than the color. I guess we just have different experiences in powder coating.

Sorry gang, I guess we derailed this thread a little.

Now back to your regularly scheduled program.
They were all clear. But some had higher sheen than others. Some gave a color cast in certain light (metamerism). Some were very slightly cloudy, as though a couple percent of white powder had been perfectly mixed in (I'm sure that wasn't the cause, just describing the effect). No two were the same, even though all were "clear". We were trying to pick one formulation to be used forever more on production runs, so we were probably looking much closer than most people do. We did so after we had to scrap a rather large batch of parts because the first "clear" was that cloudy one.
 

rwm

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#37
FYI:
The 8mm ball pressed into a reamed 5/16 hole works out perfectly. No crazy glue needed.
Robert
 

rwm

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#39
Oh no! One of my balls came loose!
I need a way to ream a hole that is about .245" so I can press fit the bearing. Do I need to make that reamer myself? I could try to make a D bit reamer or I could grind 0.002 off a 1/4" reamer. Can I buy one?
Robert
 

Rong

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#42
One of our members recently piqued my interest in tops so I thought I might make a few. These would be great gifts as well especially if you have younger children in your world.

First check out some of the incredible machining and design aesthetics here:

https://www.billetspin.com/home/

Here's my attempt. Still waiting on bearings. I ordered some SiN balls.









These are both stainless flywheels with interference fit aluminum shafts.

R
Where did you order the SiN Balls? My Google search returned some disconcerting results.
 

rwm

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#43
Amazon had the 1/4" ten in a package. Prime. $14.
Got to figure out the 0.246 reamer though. Any thoughts?
Robert
 

DHarris

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#44
Instead of a reamer, could you just grind a HSS boring tool (really small one!) from a 1/4" blank and drill undersize hole and bore hole to desired width? you would not have to take much off or go very deep??
 

gnihcraes

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#45
1/8" Inch G5 Precision Si3N4 Silicon Nitride Ceramic Bearing from amazon is what's in mine.

1/8 inch center drill, depending on depth, it will usually just press fit. If not, just a drop of super glue.

photo I just took of mine all spinning at once. Still trying to perfect them.
 

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rwm

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#46
This may be crazy but I am going to try to use a tool post grinder in the lathe to take a couple thou off a 1/4" reamer. Will that work?
BTW. I have a 10 cm lens coming that will fit perfectly on that aluminum piston.
I could make a micro boring bar but it might be hard to measure the hole accuartely.
Robert
 
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wildo

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#47
I could make a micro boring bar but it might be hard to measure the hole accuartely.
Robert
See the thread I started on boring small holes. I bought a micro boring bar and while I was able to get a hole to accept a pressed in bearing, measuring was CRAZY hard!! I have a bore gage for practice. I'm using Starrett small hole gages. It's really challenging. So challenging, that I ended up ordering a .1865 + .0002" go pin gage and a .1874 - .0002" nogo gage as an alternative to the small hole gage.
 

rwm

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#48
Planning to make some red brass. 85-5-5-5.



I have about 1.8 kilo of Cu. I have weighed out about 110 g of Pb (from an xray tube) Sn from eBay, and Zn from the usual source. That ugly chunk top left is mystery brass that I am assuming is about 70/30 Cu/Zn. I will add about a kilo of that for volume and that will dilute my concentrations a little. That will be OK as long as there is no Si in it which I doubt. Some of the Zn will burn out during melting too. There is some solder on the pipe which is probably Sn-Sb? I will be happy if I end up around 85,8,4,4. If I can get all the copper into solution this will look really red. The lead will be at least 3% which will help with machinability.
Any thoughts from you metallurgists out there?
Robert
 

rwm

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#50
Yes sir. All 2.5% copper. I'm sure this won't turn as nice as extruded bar, but I'm hoping it is acceptable.
R
 

intjonmiller

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#51
I haven't poured any copper alloys yet (I have a LOT of copper and related metals all sorted and waiting for me to get around to it, and I've read a lot on the subject, but no actual pours yet), but it seems to be fairly straightforward based on the quality I see some fools on YouTube producing without any regard for metallurgy, safety, etc. Producing an accurate alloy, a clean form casting, etc. are other matters. But for just casting stock I doubt you'll have much trouble. If you aren't already you should spend some time on alloyavenue.com.
 

intjonmiller

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#54
What a great casting station! By all means feel free to share more photos or even video of it in use. Your flask looks great as well. Is that your own construction?
 

kvt

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#57
what size and type is your crucible and where did you get it. I have a bunch of brass, copper, and alum, and would like to start trying to cast some pieces once I get my equipment back together.
 

intjonmiller

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#58
I can't speak for him, but I can tell you that the best value I've found is from www.lmine.com. #8 or #10 is about as big as most people care to go for handling alone. Copper and copper alloys get very heavy (remember, as Robert has so conveniently shown here, that you have to build in a sprue and risers in most casting, and that can easily double the volume needed for a pour).
 

rwm

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#59
It is an A6 Super Salamander. Great crucible. $40 on Amazon. Highly recommend.
This pour was 3 Kg which is about half of an A6. I have an A8 but I only use that for aluminum. Rarely for Gold.
R
 
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