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South Bend 9a Restoration (pic Heavy)

Discussion in 'MACHINE RESTORATION & WAY SCRAPING' started by wildo, Mar 8, 2016.

  1. wildo

    wildo Active Member Active Member

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    Good idea, George! Thanks for the advice!
     
  2. Kernbigo

    Kernbigo United States Active User Active Member

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    I respectful disagree with polishing the plain spindle bearings, the spindle should be polished like you did but the plain bearings should have oil pockets in them not polished. I used to hand scrap in od grinders center less grinders etc. and that is the wrong way to do it you wont have any area to hold the oil film. I hand scraped my 9" wide bed spindle in and i can run my bearing down to + .0005 lift which is very tight.
     

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  3. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Kernbigo,

    I hope those were duplicate post. I went ahead and deleted them for you.
     
  4. Kernbigo

    Kernbigo United States Active User Active Member

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    i posted the wrong picture thanks
     
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  5. wildo

    wildo Active Member Active Member

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    Give credit where credit is due... I was just watching BasementShopGuy's shaper restoration series on YouTube and in Part 3 he comments (at 9:04) that *HE* took a pristine section of South Bend painted part to Ben Moore and had this color formulated. I couldn't recall what video I had found this in, and I guess I rediscovered it today. In fact, in the original video that I took this screen capture of, he didn't go into detail about the back history of determining this color code. But in the shaper video, he mentions taking the South Bend part to Ben Moore and getting it scanned. So there you go... firm believer in citing sources when possible!


    Also- if you check out the video linked in this post, you'll see the High Gloss version of this paint, whereas I used the Low Luster version for my lathe. I do far prefer the low luster myself. Nice to be able to see the difference though.

    I do find the color very pleasing, and in this photo you can see the drastic difference between a standard "machine grey" as on my Burke mill and the SB color. DSC_2436_rdc_zpstjmm3tln.jpg
     
  6. USNFC

    USNFC United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I'm going to pull this back to the top Wildo, cause I was late to view...I don't spend much time on the computer. But, you restoration looks great. I have to be honest, I would have tossed the nameplates and had new ones laser etched(Father in law discount!), but yours look much better! Bigtime kudos on those. The restoration as a whole and the attention to detail is inspirational. Job very well done!
     
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  7. brino

    brino Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    @wildo,

    What a nice bright shop space you have!
    That must be great to work in.

    -brino
     
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  8. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    That floor would drive me nuts to look at! A solid color like a light gray would be my choice or something else close to it.
     
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  9. roadie33

    roadie33 Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I'd make some 2' tall Chess pieces and play a game. :D
     
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  10. george wilson

    george wilson United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I like the checkerboard floor.
     
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  11. David VanNorman

    David VanNorman United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Darn nice job on the lathe. Cleanest shop I ever did see.
     
  12. wildo

    wildo Active Member Active Member

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    Not currently! It's a mess!! My German Shepherd passed away about three months ago and I just haven't made it back into the shop since. (I know that's an unintelligible and nonsensical correlation, but never the less- there it is.) The shop sits in a 95% completed state just waiting for me to get back in there and finish it off. I do have high hopes of spending a good amount of quality time with the lathe (and mill) once snowfall hits this winter. At least that's the plan. And hey- if I don't get in there, it's not like the machinery is going anywhere. I have sooooo many hobbies and so little time.

    Thanks everyone for the nice comments!
     
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  13. rwm

    rwm Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I am a dog person too. Tough to lose a friend like that. So sorry to hear. If I'm in the shop for too long my little girl comes in to let me know to take a (play) break.
    Shop looks great!
    Robert
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2016
  14. Christo

    Christo United States Iron Registered Member

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    Color me impressed. That's a sweet shop.
    Amazing work on the lathe.
    I will be following along with interest as I prepare to endeavor into my 1940 9A.
     
  15. wildo

    wildo Active Member Active Member

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    I have a nice set of updates for the lathe for you all to enjoy!

    I got the lathe bolted down as well as the countershaft assembly:
    IMG_0234_zpsao8wt1da.jpg

    I drilled a hole in my work bench to accept these cable grommet things. Actually this wasn't particularly easy since this is a 1.75" thick rock maple bench top:
    IMG_0456_zpstaps8jgg.jpg

    Once the lathe and countershaft were bolted down, I could measure for the belt lengths:
    IMG_0237_zpsq48klnxg.jpg

    For the record, I opted for an AX42 belt for the countershaft, which seems to work just fine.
    IMG_0238_zpsfemdyxzc.jpg

    I also made sure the belt alignment was set before finally bolting everything down:
    IMG_0233_zpsa96whpbb.jpg

    Unfortunately, I do measure .007" wobble in the motor pulley which causes a noise as the belt spins on there. While the hub of the large pulley is clearly not on center, I do only measure .001" wobble in the large pulley. Both the motor shaft and the countershaft measure no reasonable runout. So the noise is from the motor pulley itself. At least this is a cheap fix:
    IMG_0482_zpszd8jod6m.jpg

    I mounted the VFD below the bench. I bought a TECO JNEV-101-H1N4S (which is the weather proof enclosure) because it had the built in direction and speed pot. I mounted the VFD forward enough where it's comfortable to reach under the bench and find the speed pot directly. This way I don't have to mess with installing a remote speed pot somewhere else. Besides that, I got a good deal on the VFD via eBay:
    IMG_0483_zps9yexzqpe.jpg

    I got the spindle and back gears finally installed as well:
    IMG_0504_zpsbdbhl9oe.jpg

    IMG_0505_zpslvs2rggb.jpg
     
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  16. wildo

    wildo Active Member Active Member

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    Switch

    My lathe is a 1941 model (made in Oct 1940, actually) and was originally equipped with the now obsolete and impossible to find push button switch. When I bought the lathe, the push button switch gear guard casting was included but had been retrofitted with a drum switch. I realize the drum switch is probably the better option, but I really wanted to pay homage to the lathe's history and restore it to original. Of course, you simply can't get these switches any longer. I decided I would make my own.

    I designed the switch plate based off of this photo of the original switch:
    img108_zps3mbpbuj6.jpg

    I used a stop switch from a 1971 Allen Bradley switch box. The FWD/REV arrow switch buttons are from a vintage Evinrude boat motor controller. The 3D printing was really course and needed a LOT of work to bring into a usable shape:
    IMG_0454_zpsmsw78vc2.jpg

    I used an epoxy filler designed for smoothing 3D prints in order to fill in the gaps in the print:
    IMG_0457_zps6872uqil.jpg

    Lots and lots of layers of paint and sanding to fill in the smaller pin holes:
    IMG_0468_zpsa7f9qwdu.jpg

    It ended up with a pretty nice finish!
    IMG_0477_zpsvfjluaq7.jpg

    The Allen Bradley stop switch was highly modified and then mounted to the 3D print:
    IMG_0459_zpstnur4ktg.jpg

    The Evinrude switch buttons were shortened, drilled out, and the electronics switch buttons inserted in them so that the switch buttons will snap onto the switches:
    IMG_0460_zpsh4keh2ak.jpg

    IMG_0462_zpsln8xazb5.jpg

    The switch assembly was then assembled:
    IMG_0479_zpsy6bi86ob.jpg

    IMG_0480_zps7fvzfjxp.jpg

    Turns out that my VFD doesn't support on/off via momentary switches like I thought it did. I ended up using the schematic mentioned here in order to build a flip-flop latching relay circuit so I could turn my momentary switch pulses into a latching switch. I built this circuit:
    IMG_0524_zpsnx7dnxzi.jpg

    Wires were installed on the switch:
    IMG_0525_zpsjirffgrk.jpg

    And then somehow I had to figure out how to fit this mess into the switch casing:
    IMG_0526_zpskvqjh84m.jpg

    ...Which went fine:
    IMG_0528_zpsjnwy8rna.jpg
     
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  17. wildo

    wildo Active Member Active Member

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    Completion!

    The lathe is now complete! I still need to level it and do all the setup stuff, but the restoration is complete. It took me 313 days of work start to finish (off and on, of course). I'm really pleased with how it came out, and I'm excited to start making some chips!!

    IMG_8022_zpsvibecgeq.jpg

    IMG_8023_zpsimqbmodc.jpg

    IMG_0510_zpsa4s2k9w2.jpg

    IMG_0513_zpssm24osfp.jpg

    IMG_0509_zpshwt5mhbh.jpg

    IMG_0514_zpswjackzdz.jpg

    IMG_0512_zpsnl6khbgq.jpg

    IMG_0508_zpsrszbqvxt.jpg

    And if 159 photos in this thread weren't enough for you, here's two videos of the final result that you might enjoy.


     
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  18. brino

    brino Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Wow!

    That is a very thorough restoration. Building your own custom switch plate to get the vintage look........Fantastic.

    I can see/hear the pride in your work.
    That pride is well deserved.
    Great Work!

    -brino
     
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  19. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Very nice work! Like fine sculpture. But it isn't a lathe until there are chips and cutting oil in the chip pan...;)
     
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  20. wildo

    wildo Active Member Active Member

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    Indeed! Yet *so much* to learn still. I think about this often- I've made stuff my whole life; I have a garage full of tools and a brain full of knowledge on how to use them. If I want to make a bench, for example, I know where to go to buy the material. I know how to choose one material over another. I know what tools will be needed. I know what order of operations I want to perform. I know how I would go about finishing it. I know how to do it...

    But I don't know any of this for machining! I don't know where to buy material. I don't know the differences in materials. I don't know how to grind a tool bit. I don't know how to adjust my feeds/speeds. I don't know how to improve my finishes. I don't know the order of operations... Know what I mean?

    I guess the good thing is that in knowing what I don't know- I have a clear and obvious path forward. Sure it might all be new to me, but fabricating something- anything- still has the same design process regardless of the material and tool. I just need to do lots more research on my questions and start making some chips! All in time, all in time.
     
  21. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Discovery is much of the fun of learning any new endeavor. In any case, you are in the correct (and best, IMHO) forum for asking questions. No question is too silly here...

    First, learn those safety precautions that are distinct to the lathe, then proceed slowly, with the approach "what can go wrong here?". One "OH SH**" cancels out a thousand atta' boys.
     
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  22. bob135

    bob135 United Kingdom Iron Registered Member

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    Hi First post here on this forum! Im in the UK. But have to say very nice "restoration" ( i wont get into the terminology like often get pointed out on a certain other forum).
    I love the Matt /satin look to the paint and the colour. Ive done one 1963 9A and have a 1942 one 3/4 finished. I used a Boxford lathe colour (not quite as blue in real life) but if i did it again i would have used something more like yours.
    The colour you used is very like Rustoleum mouse grey that i did a Walker Turner bandsaw with and the lathe cabinet in the photo.
    Bob P1240873.JPG before.jpg
     
  23. Bill Gruby

    Bill Gruby United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Beautiful restoration.

    "Billy G"
     
  24. bob135

    bob135 United Kingdom Iron Registered Member

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    Thanks Bill, i think you learn alot about how the machine works in the progress of rebuilding them ,which i found out being a relative novice to machining. I think i learned alot i didnt know .
     

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