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Some Useful Lathe Tools

Discussion in 'TOOL JUNKIES - TOOLS & TOOLING (Love Tools? This Is Your Forum)' started by Nels, Sep 27, 2010.

  1. charris9130

    charris9130 United States Iron Registered Member

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    City:
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    I work on outboard an inboard motors I got a Shop in Clarksville Tennessee

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G920A using Tapatalk
     
  2. charris9130

    charris9130 United States Iron Registered Member

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    I want to thank you for sharing that I just bought another Lathe 1cd14373657069bb0cf9593fe3e364e8.jpg 770bff90331a486c1fba05722518dad3.jpg 45bc353d321d6ed5f2ae7c6f907ab529.jpg

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    dlane likes this.
  3. charris9130

    charris9130 United States Iron Registered Member

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    they had it hooked up and running I'm in the process of opening up automotive machine shop I just got a real good deal on that I have a small jet we been using I'm I'm closing up for tonight the shop up and head to the house

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  4. Holt

    Holt Denmark Machinist Active Member

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    Hejnsvig Denmark
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    I find it very strange that no one have mentioned digital readout, it's one of the very best upgrades you can make for your lathe (and mill for that matter)
     
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  5. dlane

    dlane Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Location:
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    Oroville
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    Thanks to all with full size pics :encourage:
     
  6. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    If you haven't fixed it, you didn't use a big enough hammer. (old marine engineers saying.)
     
  7. tertiaryjim

    tertiaryjim Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    City:
    Naturita
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    Colorado

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    In the millwrights we called em Beaters. Had to be minimum 2.5 lbs.
    This was carried up to 16 lbs when they were rated as sledge hammers.
    No! Not 8lb 10lb or even 12lb with a long handle. Still beaters.
    Spent many hours swinging a 20 lb sledge while balancing on a turbine shell.
    Then came the hydraulic wrenches and they were the best thing since fire was invented.
    Sorry. Just needed to ramble.
     
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  8. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    In my early days as a marine engineer I can remember using a 28 lb sledge on a flogging spanner tightening the nuts on a cylinder hear of diesel engine.
     
  9. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Never felt the need. Does it make the machine any more accurate, or does it just compensate for lack of machinist skills. It's a bit like driving a car with auto trans, you're not driving only staring it.
     
  10. hman

    hman Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    A DRO has two advantages, at least for me:
    (1) It saves counting turns. This is especially nice with Chinese tools that have metric leadscrews and pseudo-inch calibrations on the dials, or else 1/16" pitch leadscrews. It's always a challenge to convert an inch measurement to turns in these circumstances. Yes, it can be done. But when I'm machining, I want to use the limited bandwidth of my aging brain to decide on details other than keeping track of turns.
    (2) It lets you know where you are (OK ... where the tool is) regardless of backlash. You don't have to keep track of which way you last turned the crank. Think of using an edge finder to find the center of a part, where you have to approach opposite faces from opposite directions. Again, it can be done. But to do a good job, you have to know the amount of backlash to a gnat's eyelash. Very easy to make a mistake.

    YMMV
     

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