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[4]

Some Useful Lathe Tools

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charris9130

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#31
I work on outboard an inboard motors I got a Shop in Clarksville Tennessee

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charris9130

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#32
I want to thank you for sharing that I just bought another Lathe 1cd14373657069bb0cf9593fe3e364e8.jpg 770bff90331a486c1fba05722518dad3.jpg 45bc353d321d6ed5f2ae7c6f907ab529.jpg

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charris9130

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#33
they had it hooked up and running I'm in the process of opening up automotive machine shop I just got a real good deal on that I have a small jet we been using I'm I'm closing up for tonight the shop up and head to the house

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Holt

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#34
I find it very strange that no one have mentioned digital readout, it's one of the very best upgrades you can make for your lathe (and mill for that matter)
 

Downunder Bob

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#36
In the states we call those BFH

Or Big F***** Hammer. A very useful tool in the auto repair industry.
If you haven't fixed it, you didn't use a big enough hammer. (old marine engineers saying.)
 

tertiaryjim

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#37
In the millwrights we called em Beaters. Had to be minimum 2.5 lbs.
This was carried up to 16 lbs when they were rated as sledge hammers.
No! Not 8lb 10lb or even 12lb with a long handle. Still beaters.
Spent many hours swinging a 20 lb sledge while balancing on a turbine shell.
Then came the hydraulic wrenches and they were the best thing since fire was invented.
Sorry. Just needed to ramble.
 

Downunder Bob

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#38
In the millwrights we called em Beaters. Had to be minimum 2.5 lbs.
This was carried up to 16 lbs when they were rated as sledge hammers.
No! Not 8lb 10lb or even 12lb with a long handle. Still beaters.
Spent many hours swinging a 20 lb sledge while balancing on a turbine shell.
Then came the hydraulic wrenches and they were the best thing since fire was invented.
Sorry. Just needed to ramble.
In my early days as a marine engineer I can remember using a 28 lb sledge on a flogging spanner tightening the nuts on a cylinder head of a large marine diesel engine.
 
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Downunder Bob

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#39
I find it very strange that no one have mentioned digital readout, it's one of the very best upgrades you can make for your lathe (and mill for that matter)
Never felt the need. Does it make the machine any more accurate, or does it just compensate for lack of machinist skills. It's a bit like driving a car with auto trans, you're not driving only stearing it.

Speaking of Auto trans, I remember as a teenager that we used to say auto was invented for people who live in San Francisco, because most roads are on steep inclines and and every cross treet has traffic lights, and most people couldn't cope with clutch starts.
 
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hman

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#40
A DRO has two advantages, at least for me:
(1) It saves counting turns. This is especially nice with Chinese tools that have metric leadscrews and pseudo-inch calibrations on the dials, or else 1/16" pitch leadscrews. It's always a challenge to convert an inch measurement to turns in these circumstances. Yes, it can be done. But when I'm machining, I want to use the limited bandwidth of my aging brain to decide on details other than keeping track of turns.
(2) It lets you know where you are (OK ... where the tool is) regardless of backlash. You don't have to keep track of which way you last turned the crank. Think of using an edge finder to find the center of a part, where you have to approach opposite faces from opposite directions. Again, it can be done. But to do a good job, you have to know the amount of backlash to a gnat's eyelash. Very easy to make a mistake.

YMMV
 

Downunder Bob

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#42
One of my most useful workshop 'tools' is a telescopic magnet to save me bending down every time I drop a tool or drill bit etc.
Yes, I've got a few of them scattered around the shop, I can no longer pick up anything from the floor. I've also got a couple of those gripper type picker upper things for the non magnetic stuff.
 

John25

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#43
Also useful, when I put a polly bag over it, for picking up swarf and chips, reverse the bag and shake into the bin.

I also use poly bags with internal magnets as way protectors and do as above.

Not my idea, this or another forum tip.
 

toolman120

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#44
Also useful, when I put a polly bag over it, for picking up swarf and chips, reverse the bag and shake into the bin.

I also use poly bags with internal magnets as way protectors and do as above.

Not my idea, this or another forum tip.
For collecting swarf i made a gadget with a retractable rare earth magnet inside a capped copper water pipe with a generous size grommet a few inches from the end.
Magnet works through the copper to grab a handful of swarf, then when over my shop bin, retract the magnet up the tube and the grommet scrapes off all the swarf.

Best thing since sliced bread.

I used surplus carbon fibre tent pole as the inner shaft but wood dowel would do fine or aluminium. Cost me only for the 2 end caps...total of $2.00
The pole, tube, shaft, magnet and a screw to secure a surplus magnet to the shaft were all in junk stock.

You can buy them for about $80. :)


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Downunder Bob

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#45
For collecting swarf i made a gadget with a retractable rare earth magnet inside a capped copper water pipe with a generous size grommet a few inches from the end.
Magnet works through the copper to grab a handful of swarf, then when over my shop bin, retract the magnet up the tube and the grommet scrapes off all the swarf.

Best thing since sliced bread.

I used surplus carbon fibre tent pole as the inner shaft but wood dowel would do fine or aluminium. Cost me only for the 2 end caps...total of $2.00
The pole, tube, shaft, magnet and a screw to secure a surplus magnet to the shaft were all in junk stock.

You can buy them for about $80. :)


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hman

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#46
Here's something similar I've made a bunch of. K&S brass tubing, .005" brass shim soft soldered on the end, edges trimmed off, ΓΈ8mm x 20mm RE magnet, steel screw (end drilled 3/32") soft soldered to 3/32" copper coated welding rod, rubber washer. I make a batch of them every once in a while and pass them around at machinist club meetings. It's thin enough to reach into the T-slot grooves on a mill table. Just wish I could figger out how to make it work for aluminum :)
kHPIM4916.jpg
 

Doodle

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#47
I use the Harbor Freight Tool Indexable lathe Bits #39931. At $25 they are a bargain for a whole set. The only HSS tool grinding I have done is for fly cutting 6061 for a nice finish. I have found the insert tooling will work in fly cutting hard steel.
upload_2017-8-30_7-12-4.png
 

Silverbullet

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#48
You guys talk about BFH , I remember having to use a 20lb sledge to move castings on a boring mill and a open sided planer. That and 6' digging bar , these castings weighed in at about a ton. Lots of good work at everworth machine. It's a wonder all of us who worked there are still alive we repacked the furnace doors and baked them every weekend. Really good guys and friends worked lots of hours together you could count on them that's close knit shop. One old guy was a boozer to the point at lunch if he didn't come back he was drunk at otts down the road. Our foreman would take him home after the shift. I think he saw to much in ww11 . Lots of my friends did .
 

homebrewed

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#49
A "good" end mill can be used as a small boring bar, too. I once made a decorative spinning water sprinkler which used nested brass tubing and some brass rings for the rotating seal. The rings were separated by nylon balls for a low-friction bearing (all this stuff went inside some 1/2" copper tubing). I needed to turn the IDs of the brass rings to match the two pieces of nesting brass tubing, but all my standard boring bars were too big. After some thought I grabbed my smallest end mill whose shank matched my boring bar holder, rotated it so one of the cutters was in line with the cross slide motion, and went to work. It worked beautifully. I was concerned about the "grab" that might result, since the cutter effectively has a large positive rake (and I was machining brass), but it went fine -- I just took it easy with a lot of light cuts.

Caveat: This would work OK with softer materials but boring steel might produce an uneven wear pattern on the end mill.
 

bobl

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#50
A DRO has two advantages, at least for me:
(1) It saves counting turns. This is especially nice with Chinese tools that have metric leadscrews and pseudo-inch calibrations on the dials, or else 1/16" pitch leadscrews. It's always a challenge to convert an inch measurement to turns in these circumstances. Yes, it can be done. But when I'm machining, I want to use the limited bandwidth of my aging brain to decide on details other than keeping track of turns.
(2) It lets you know where you are (OK ... where the tool is) regardless of backlash. You don't have to keep track of which way you last turned the crank. Think of using an edge finder to find the center of a part, where you have to approach opposite faces from opposite directions. Again, it can be done. But to do a good job, you have to know the amount of backlash to a gnat's eyelash. Very easy to make a mistake.

YMMV
Great for pitching out holes


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Downunder Bob

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#51
I haven't tried a DRO yet always done it the old way, but I might have to soon, as my eyes aren't what they used to be. I had to trade the old faithful vernier caliper in for a digtal one a few years ago, I just couldn't read the fine divisions any more.

I don't have a problem with the dials on my new lathe, the lead screws are all imperial but all the hand wheels are calibrated in both imperial and metric, and so far appear to be quit accurate.
 
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Bamban

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#52
Monitoring the tool post instead of the cross slide when making adjustments especially when I used to thread with the compound or making sub thou cut to hit a certain dimension

When turning to a shoulder I feel more confident watching an analog indicator instead of digits flipping around. I love the Trav-A-Dial.


20170127_091709.jpg

Resized_20150316_172253.jpeg
 
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Downunder Bob

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#53
Monitoring the tool post instead of the cross slide when making adjustments especially when I used to thread with the compound or making sub thou cut to hit a certain dimension

When turning to a shoulder I feel more confident watching an analog indicator instead of digits flipping around. I love the Trav-A-Dial.


View attachment 241024

View attachment 241023
Looks good, but they're awfully bloody expensive.
 

Downunder Bob

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#54
I haven't tried a DRO yet always done it the old way, but I might have to soon, as my eyes aren't what they used to be. I had to trade the old faithful vernier caliper in for a digtal one a few years ago, I just couldn't read the fine divisions any more.

I don't have a problem with the dials on my new lathe, the lead screws are all imperial but all the hand wheels are calibrated in both imperial and metric, and so far appear to be quit accurate.
I reckon, I could make a pretty good DRO out of a digital caliper, works in Imp, and metric, can reset zero anywhere, and very cheap.
 
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