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Some Useful Lathe Tools

Nels

Founder
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium
#1
? quick change tool post and holders
? cutoff tool and holder
? knurling tool
? lathe cutting tools, including inside and outside threading. HSS and maybe indexable carbide
? follower rest
? steady rest
? live center
? lathe faceplate
? collets
? 4-jaw independent chuck
? boring bar for lathe
? carriage stops and carriage dial indicator holder for lathe
? tailstock drill chuck with taper adapter
? lathe dog, dead center for lathe spindle and faceplate or driving plate
? milling attachment for lathe
? center drills
? assorted files and wet/dry sandpaper
? horizontal bandsaw for cutting stock, bimetal blades.
? bench grinder for grinding lathe bits. Wheels, incl. a diamond wheel if you want to sharpen carbide. Grinding wheel dresser.
? lathe tool blanks, for grinding
? belt/disk sander
? Swing arm magnifying lamp, mounted over lathe/mill
? way lube/spindle lube
? safety shield with mag base
? center punch
? scribes
? reamers
? stub length drill bits
? countersink bits
? metal, plastic to cut (OnlineMetals, SpeedyMetals, etc).
? A shop vacuum

Some sources: Shars, Travers Tool, Enco, MSC, Grizzly Ind., Tools4cheap, CDCO, Little Machine Shop, Ebay, Machine Shop Discount Club, Reid Tool Supply, Anytimetools.

Please feel free to add to this list!

Best,

Nelson
 

aametalmaster

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium
#2
Don't forget the tweezers and a magnifing glass for the little splinters. I keep both at lathe side...Bob
 

aametalmaster

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium
#3
Save your old broken taps. They can be ground for lathe tooling for special projects where you don't want to use a sq tool bit for one job like a small groove...Bob
 

British Steel

Active User
Active Member
#4
I'll add to the list! Stuff I find makes life easier:

DTI gauge and stand/holder (essential for centring in the 4-jaw, checking lathe alignment etc.)
ball-bearing on a toolblank for quick centring stock in the chuck (unbelievably fast, accurate enough for Government Work!)
dremeloid (with a bracket it's a toolpost internal grinder, a cross-drilling spindle, incredibly-light-duty milling head - too many uses to count!)
variable-speed router motor in a bracket (see above, but 1/2 HP instead of 1/20th! Its bearings are designed for side loads, too)
Taper adaptor (fits on the back of the bed, shifts the cross-slide to cut tapered work like Morse tapers, pipe threads)
quick-withdraw toolpost / cross-slide (speeds up threading like you wouldn't believe!)
Fishtail gauge for grinding / setting threading tools
Band-Aids - assuming you've got HSS sharpening under your belt :)

definite +1 on the QC toolpost

Just my ha'pennorth, Dave H.
 

Dutch

Active User
Active Member
#5
Shars = discount_machine on ebay. The ebay prices are quite a bit lower than the Shars catalog and I've had excellent service from them off ebay.

http://stores.ebay.com/Discount-Machine-Shop?_rdc=1

Some other ebay vendors I've done biz with:

800watt http://shop.ebay.com/800watt/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_from=&_ipg=25

AZtool-Jerry http://stores.ebay.com/AZTOOL-JERRY?_rdc=1

hemlytool http://stores.ebay.com/hemlytool?_rdc=1

Keen Abrasives http://stores.ebay.com/KEEN-ABRASIVES?_rdc=1

Speedy Metals http://stores.ebay.com/The-Speedy-Metals-Listings-Store?_rdc=1
I usually buy off their website www.speedymetals.com

Dutch
 

Robert62

Active Member
Active Member
#6
Some more things to add:
- An adapter so I can quickly put all my lathe chucks on my rotary table
- A quick change tool post adapter to hold my dremel tool
 

Ozwelder

Active User
Active Member
#7
One thing I find I could not do with out is a roll of toilet paper and holder.
It's there and handy for any spills or wiping up the oil when I oil and clean out the bed ways and slides. The credit goes the the bloke who fixes stringed instruments and has a bit of a site full of those handy tips.

Also put long tee handles on the allen key that unscrews the 3 cap head bolts holding the compound slide.The tee handle raises the turning well effort above the toolpost level and makes the task so quick and non fidlly .
 

Turner-Tom

Swarf
Registered Member
#8
Not forgetting...The Bloody Big Hammer!!!!

Not only will it make all things "Fit" better!

But you can hurl it through the window and feel much better about life! :thumbsup:
 

ome

Active User
Active Member
#11
? quick change tool post and holders
? cutoff tool and holder
? knurling tool
? lathe cutting tools, including inside and outside threading. HSS and maybe indexable carbide
? follower rest
? steady rest
? live center
? lathe faceplate
? collets
? 4-jaw independent chuck
? boring bar for lathe
? carriage stops and carriage dial indicator holder for lathe
? tailstock drill chuck with taper adapter
? lathe dog, dead center for lathe spindle and faceplate or driving plate
? milling attachment for lathe
? center drills
? assorted files and wet/dry sandpaper
? horizontal bandsaw for cutting stock, bimetal blades.
? bench grinder for grinding lathe bits. Wheels, incl. a diamond wheel if you want to sharpen carbide. Grinding wheel dresser.
? lathe tool blanks, for grinding
? belt/disk sander
? Swing arm magnifying lamp, mounted over lathe/mill
? way lube/spindle lube
? safety shield with mag base
? center punch
? scribes
? reamers
? stub length drill bits
? countersink bits
? metal, plastic to cut (OnlineMetals, SpeedyMetals, etc).
? A shop vacuum

Some sources: Shars, Travers Tool, Enco, MSC, Grizzly Ind., Tools4cheap, CDCO, Little Machine Shop, Ebay, Machine Shop Discount Club, Reid Tool Supply, Anytimetools.

Please feel free to add to this list!

,Best,

Nelson
Hi Nelson,
Thanks for the list, which I hope is ok to add a few machines to this great list.

? A small surface grinder( even though I got it a week ago, I love this little machine)
? A Hepa filtered vacuum specific to removing toxic metals from grinding carbide, has a bag to empty when full.

Thanks,
Jon
 

samthedog

Active User
Active Member
#12
Swarf hook, color matched touch-up paint and small brush to touch up dings and scratches, diamond hone to touch up bits, cutting oil and small brush, first aid kit, rough use caliper and nice caliper / micrometer.

Paul.
 

NodakGary

Active User
Active Member
#14
Was a tool-shaping/sharpening grinder mentioned. Don't forget a couple small containers of water for cooling the cutters as you sharpen them. And for cooling the operator on those hot days. And for cooling the chunk of steel wool that starts to smoke and glimmer in the welding end of the shop after it reminds you it didn't like being there. Don't ask me how I know.
NodakGary
Ready for Spring. How about you?
 

Xiansheng

Active Member
Active Member
#16
Re the list at the start of this thread, is there a list of URLs or whatever that provides access to information about these items?
 

Doubleeboy

Active User
Active Member
#17
Double stick tape, hold thin parts to faceplate for turning, or similarly use for milling thin parts on mill. Caution, do not put tape over 100% of part or you will spend a long time removing part. Acetone will help weaken the tape if you over do it.
 

Rex Walters

Active Member
Active Member
#18
Kinda obvious, but a digital caliper is amazingly handy, especially when turning to size. Zero the caliper, adjust to the diameter you want, re-zero, then measure the diameter of your part while it's in the chuck or collet. Now you know exactly how much to take off. Despite their cheap price and "very near" reputation, I've found them surprisingly accurate. Use a micrometer if you need tenths accuracy, but calipers are usually accurate enough for the work I do (the mic always gives the same reading, except when I don't use the mic ;-).

Also, if you have a small lathe like mine with a cross-slide dial that reads radial dimensions rather than "direct reading" diameters, consider making larger dials and marking them to read diameters directly. It's amazing how much mental friction the constant halving/doubling of dimensions causes -- so glad I made this improvement to my lathe.

Now I'm off to hunt around outside (far outside) my shop window for my, uh, "collection" of broken taps....
 

rrdstarr

Iron
Registered Member
#19
A ball turning tool blueprint would be very helpful!

Thanks!
Rick

In the states we call those BFH

Or Big F***** Hammer. A very useful tool in the auto repair industry.
? quick change tool post and holders
? cutoff tool and holder
? knurling tool
? lathe cutting tools, including inside and outside threading. HSS and maybe indexable carbide
? follower rest
? steady rest
? live center
? lathe faceplate
? collets
? 4-jaw independent chuck
? boring bar for lathe
? carriage stops and carriage dial indicator holder for lathe
? tailstock drill chuck with taper adapter
? lathe dog, dead center for lathe spindle and faceplate or driving plate
? milling attachment for lathe
? center drills
? assorted files and wet/dry sandpaper
? horizontal bandsaw for cutting stock, bimetal blades.
? bench grinder for grinding lathe bits. Wheels, incl. a diamond wheel if you want to sharpen carbide. Grinding wheel dresser.
? lathe tool blanks, for grinding
? belt/disk sander
? Swing arm magnifying lamp, mounted over lathe/mill
? way lube/spindle lube
? safety shield with mag base
? center punch
? scribes
? reamers
? stub length drill bits
? countersink bits
? metal, plastic to cut (OnlineMetals, SpeedyMetals, etc).
? A shop vacuum

Some sources: Shars, Travers Tool, Enco, MSC, Grizzly Ind., Tools4cheap, CDCO, Little Machine Shop, Ebay, Machine Shop Discount Club, Reid Tool Supply, Anytimetools.

Please feel free to add to this list!

Best,

Nelson
 

hvontres

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#20
Kinda obvious, but a digital caliper is amazingly handy, especially when turning to size. Zero the caliper, adjust to the diameter you want, re-zero, then measure the diameter of your part while it's in the chuck or collet. Now you know exactly how much to take off. Despite their cheap price and "very near" reputation, I've found them surprisingly accurate. Use a micrometer if you need tenths accuracy, but calipers are usually accurate enough for the work I do (the mic always gives the same reading, except when I don't use the mic ;-).

Also, if you have a small lathe like mine with a cross-slide dial that reads radial dimensions rather than "direct reading" diameters, consider making larger dials and marking them to read diameters directly. It's amazing how much mental friction the constant halving/doubling of dimensions causes -- so glad I made this improvement to my lathe.

Now I'm off to hunt around outside (far outside) my shop window for my, uh, "collection" of broken taps....
And if you are lucky enough to own a digital mic or two, you can use the same trick down to the tenths. This is also an easy way to do metric work on on inch lathe or inch work on a metric lathe.
 

Silverbullet

Active Member
Active Member
#21
Several good overhead lights always helps , a maid to clean up after us , plenty of shelves and cabinets for storing . Automatic oilers for our lathes one pump type, even hour meters to keep track of jobs and times to service the machines.
 

RIMSPOKE

Active Member
Active Member
#25
Please feel free to add to this list!

THIS IS ONE I COOKED UP A FEW YEARS AGO .
IT IS A SIX JAW 4" BUCK CHUCK MOUNTED ON A SOLID 5-c COLLET .

THIS IS PERFECT FOR GRIPPING SMALL & DELICATE PARTS .
THE 5-C MOUNTING WAS DONE BY WELDING A MOUNTING PLATE TO A SOLID COLLET
AND THEM MACHINING ALL THE MOUNTING SURFACES SO IT RUNS TRUE .

THIS MAKES IT EASY TO GO FROM A COLLET TO THE CHUCK & BACK .
I HAVE BOTH INSIDE & OUTSIDE JAWS FOR IT .

DSC_0466.JPG

DSC_0026.JPG

DSC_0026.JPG
 

RIMSPOKE

Active Member
Active Member
#27
Rimspoke, do you dabble in outboards? Or did you?

I HAVE NEVER HAD AN OUTBOARD .
HIT-N-MISS & MICROCARS MOTORS ARE MORE UP MY ALLEY .

DSC_0494.JPG
 

RIMSPOKE

Active Member
Active Member
#29
Freeway?????

WELL ,NO .
THAT ONE IS A MESSERSCHMITT TIGER WITH A HONDA 600 COUPE DRIVETRAIN .
IT IS FULL OF SPECIALLY MACHINED PARTS . 36 HORSES IN A 750 POUND CAR .

DSC_1502.JPG

BUT NOW THAT YOU MENTION THE FREEWAY , HERE ARE MY TWO FREEWAYS .
THE YELLOW ONE IS BRIGGS V-TWIN POWERED & THE RED ONE IS STOCK TECUMSEH . DSC_0051.JPG
 

richardsrelics

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
H-M Supporter-Premium
#30
I recognized the username, I had a Freeway as well... sold it to Jim as I was moving and could not find anyplace with enough room to keep mine... Of course once I sold it, a home popped up with PLENTY of room....LOL I do miss my little yellow car :( Good to see you again :)